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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, I am new to this forum but have viewed it many times.

I am a huge fan of MV's and I have always wanted one. I still remember my first time seeing a 750.

Anyways, I am in the market to get another bike and am trying to decide what direction I should go in.

My currect Street bike is a 2007 Triumph Speed Triple 1050 which I have owned sense 2007. I also have a 2010 Kawasaki Kx450sm. Which I converted and plated myself.

The bikes I am looking at very carefully are the Aprilia Tuono V4r, KTM 1290r, and Mv Agusta Brutale 800 "Or if I could find a 1078R"

As you can tell I am a huge fan of the triples such great engines. However I am kinda getting annoyed with my Triumphs Transmission. A smooth transmission is a must. It's one very critical aspect I am looking for.

I have always said a 800 Triple would be a dream to see come to life. And here Mv comes and makes that dream come true. Which brings me to my first quandary. How dose everyone feel about the counter rotating crank on the new triples?
Has anyone been able to clean up all the hoses and wires coming off the engine yet? That's a huge eye sore for me. And I might as well state I dont really like how Mv made the tank so boxy and flat. I miss the smooth lines of the old design Burts.
What kind of gas mileage has everyone been getting on the new 800's? I know people say you cant expect any gas mileage from these "performance machines" but I say only REAL bikers would. I like to be able to ride 200 miles with out having to stop for fuel. I do it all the time on my S3 and I would like to continue to do so. Every minute spent at the gas station could be minutes used riding.

I must say I do like the Aprilia. Its a fantastic bike. The RSV4 is one of the most beautiful bikes I have seen and I love the incredible V4 engine with a transmission to match. But they ALWAYS butcher the Tuono's design. Seriously what the heck were they thinking? It would have been so easy for them to make a proper naked bike. But nope they have to make some fugly looking cross breed.

The KTM has my favorite V-twin ever made. But I have already started hearing people missing gears and having hard shifts. So I dont think I will actully presue this bike. Which is too bad because everything else about it I loved.

So please feel free to leave any and all the input you can offer.
And sorry for the long post.
 

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Don't like the cable routing, don't like the shape of the tank, want a smooth gearbox, want to get 200 miles between fill ups? You've pretty much talked yourself out of owning an MV right there?
 

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Is the gearbox not smooth? I think it works perfect...
 

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Hey Ledelmo

The brutale 800 is a completely different animal compared to the speed triple .

I've ridden extensively the street triple R(my old bike for 4 years) and the speed triple 2008

So i can tell you the speed triple is a big bruiser of a naked roadster,It feels like it has enough torque to remove tarmac from the ground at any gear and its fun in that way.

but i personally like light weight sport bikes .In that sense the street triple was great , but the brutale 800 was everything id hope for.

Its resembles the Yamaha R6 in terms of handling like a precision scaple,not as easy as the Honda 600rr but for the advanced rider you would get more out of the R6. I personally compare the B3 to a supersport that just happens to have tons of torque and a comfortable riding position.

If you manage to sort out the suspension setting to suit you (or better yet upgrade the fork internals ) you will find this bike carries so much corner speed for a big bike , It feels like the 125 -250cc two strokes i had ridden before and its feels lighter to handle at speed then a ninja 300 for example .

This characteristic of the brutale 800 is probably a combination of the fairly reduced engine compression braking in sports mode,its counter rotating crank shaft , the light weight and short wheelbase. such a sport nimble and fiery ride :yo:

This brings up the issue of the bike being flighty and yes i agree but im sure your not a newbie so you know how to be light on the controls
ive taken the bike up to 259kph ( indicated ) and it was fine didnt wobble nervously and tracked true.

but the you cannot expect this bike to be 200 mile commuter . i do get the low fuel light on at anywhere between 190km to 230km (118 miles to 145 miles) depending on my wrist . Its probably asking to much to get 200 miles per tank

in regards to the transmission id say its gd , suprisingly a little better then my street triple and the quickshifter once u learn the range of throttle opening that it works best in is so soo sweet

that said .. youll get a better transmission in the yamaha mt 09 , seriously smooth gear shifts and very nice clutch feel . you would be spoilt on that bike.


All that said . my brutale has ahd 11,000 km on it and hasnt started since late june 2014 at 1st it was the sprag clutch/bearing for sure but even after that fix now the spark plugs arent firing.

So be aware, from all the stories and reviews. As sweet as the B3 800 is with its amazing potential to cover twisty roads and out gun larger capacity bikes . It will very likely give u issues . I personally may not keep this bike for much longer although its almost everything i wanted in a motorcycle.Heck i even find those sharp tank edges alluring =)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I really do love the design of the B3 excluding those small things. Ironically the Brutale seems to be the ONLY model they continue to make with that rats nest by the engine. Which means It shouldn't be too difficult to clean up. May I ask, Has anyone removed those plastic bits by the radiator yet? I would love to see a Brutale without them. I think it would look so much better with that beautiful tubular chassis exposed. Not much I can do about the flat boxed tank however.

As far as Gas mileage the B3 800 seems to be really good. Sounds like its getting almost 40mpg's Motorusa said they were getting about 38 with mixed riding. With a total distance of 165 miles. I am thinking someone could get a few more miles out of the tank with a little more conservative riding. Which really isnt so bad. Especially compared to the Tuono V4. The V4 seems to be all over the place when it comes to its mileage, with it never going above 35 mpg. I have even heard of people getting 20's! and were not even pushing it. Its almost shameful Aprilia would continue to have the bike run like this. They need to be hard at work to fix it instead of saying everything is fine. And again I flipping hate what they did to the tuono. I truly feel they couldn't have done worse if they had tried.

Please notice I am not just being critical of the Mv but of any bike I would consider. These two bike's are after all my favorite bike's made at the moment and for different reasons. Every bike will have its own flaws. If I wanted another S3 I would buy another S3. If I wanted something similar to the S3 but simply different I would get the 1290R.

Though, I must say I am REALLY worried about its reliability now. I thought Mv was getting better in that regards and I really haven't heard much of people having issues with the new 800's. I will have to look into this more closely.
 

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Don't like the cable routing, don't like the shape of the tank, want a smooth gearbox, want to get 200 miles between fill ups? You've pretty much talked yourself out of owning an MV right there?
I agree. Good luck on getting 200mls on a tank, especially from the Tuono. The 800 is less thirsty than the Tuono but you will be on reserve by 200km. Try the Honda Predator for a smooth gearbox & better fuel consumption, crap brakes & no "va va vavoom" (which is the other name for the B800)
 

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I usually get around 110-115 miles out of a tank before the reserve light comes on. When I bought it I kept it under 6000rpm for the first tank full and did get around 160 miles out of it. So maybe if you get off and push it you might get the 200 miles your looking for ;)

To be honest the best way to think of the Brutale 800 is as a supersports 600/750 but without a faring and a more comfortable riding position. It has the nimble sharp steering/handing, likes to rev and rewards best when pushed hard. If your looking for a bike to leisurely cruise around on covering big miles then perhaps a jap bike would suit you better?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think people are getting a little too hung up on the 200 miles thing. Like I said I would "LIKE too', never said I was expecting. But the higher the better of course. And I find it funny how no one has picked up that I AM looking for a sport type bike. After all both bikes I am looking at are simply naked counter parts to there fully faired brother.

How about this? How is everyone liking their 800's? Engine nice and torquey? Hows the transmission been? Anything falling off it yet? Do you enjoy it? or do you just ride it because of how it looks?

I am already satisfied with what people have said about the gas mileage. Just wish it had an extra .5 gal in the tank really.
 

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I think people are getting a little too hung up on the 200 miles thing. Like I said I would "LIKE too', never said I was expecting. But the higher the better of course. And I find it funny how no one has picked up that I AM looking for a sport type bike. After all both bikes I am looking at are simply naked counter parts to there fully faired brother.

How about this? How is everyone liking their 800's? Engine nice and torquey? Hows the transmission been? Anything falling off it yet? Do you enjoy it? or do you just ride it because of how it looks?

I am already satisfied with what people have said about the gas mileage. Just wish it had an extra .5 gal in the tank really.

I love it man. I love the ultra light weight handling, scalpel precision steering, more like a mountain bike than a heavy motorcycle. Quick throttle response in Sport mode and its angry growl when throttle opens. On the road, this bike is able to keep pace with the inline fours that have 180 hp. :) When pushed, you have to lean yourself far front if you want to keep it from lifting the wheel in 3rd gear :) On heavy breaking it may become wobbly, but breaking being as precise as a steering, it's easy to control it. All that being said, this bike is not for everyone, and that is particularly applicable to newbies.
 

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I love it man. I love the ultra light weight handling, scalpel precision steering, more like a mountain bike than a heavy motorcycle. Quick throttle response in Sport mode and its angry growl when throttle opens. On the road, this bike is able to keep pace with the inline fours that have 180 hp. :) When pushed, you have to lean yourself far front if you want to keep it from lifting the wheel in 3rd gear :) On heavy breaking it may become wobbly, but breaking being as precise as a steering, it's easy to control it. All that being said, this bike is not for everyone, and that is particularly applicable to newbies.
Ditto to all above. Steering damper is a big help in handling. Check your bolts and nothing should fall off. It's been perfect except for the 2 known common issues - Sprag & gear indicator. I use my bike everyday commuting & long trips weekends. It's fantastic. Much better than my old MV990r, my Speed Triple, my Tuono, my Honda Predator, my Buell etc etc.
But then I'm 5'5" and got tired of dropping my larger bikes. If I was 6" taller i would probably go back to the 1000cc bikes. The 800 is a perfect size for me.
 

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I love it man. I love the ultra light weight handling, scalpel precision steering, more like a mountain bike than a heavy motorcycle.
Its funny you should say this. I have ridden/raced mountain bikes for nearly 20 years and I just told some of my moto buddies that this B3 800 does feel much more like a mountain bike than any other motorcycle I have ridden
 

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No way in the world that youll get 200 miles out of the b3. What is interesting is how consistent the MVs mileage across different conditions. I usually manage to get somewhere between 115 and 120 miles before the light comes on (ive gone to 24 past before filling up and never ran out) but whats amazing is I get those numbers no matter what. Boring city riding with the engine <6000? 115 miles. Canyon riding in the 8-10000 range? 115 miles. I even managed to pull 120 miles out of the bike ON A TRACK. Filled the bike up at the track, did 80-90 miles of track riding, and then went home and got 115 miles. I would bet the MV in the hands of an average rider would be substantially easier to ride quickly than the ktm or the tuono just because of how light and ridiculously easy to steer it is.

I will say if youre coming from a triumph that the bike feels way more savage than the triumphs do. I was dead set on buying one of the new daytonas until MV started running their summer deal (<11000 USD for an 800 eas abs) and the MV terrified me. Its just so much more exciting than the triumphs. I would probably say the triumph is a more refined bike than the MV but sweet jesus I would ride the MV over the triumph every day of the week. I would totally say that the MVs transmission pails in comparison to the boxes in the triumphs but I actually think thats a good thing. I didnt like how the triumph box was so smooth you could barely even feel the shift until you hit the upper stop. I compare the triumph box to the MV box because I've heard the Tuono box is also buttery smooth to the point where any preload on the shifter will cause a change. Thats not quite what I'm looking for in a bike.

As far as power between the three goes its kinda a no brainer. Obviously the MV is down on the tuono and the ktm. I would almost fear the ktm makes too much torque. The thought of a naked bike making that much torque is scary when I can bring the front wheel off the ground on my MV at 120 mph in 4th gear. Whichever bike you go with you should have no problem keeping up and passing bikes (the last track day I went to I managed to pass literally everything except a zx10. That includes every japanese 600 and even panigales in less than skilled hands).

Some things I dont like about the MV?

Well the throttle issues arent 100% solved at very low rpms. Maneuvering through parking lots <3000 rpm can get a little jerky. Anything at normal to fast speeds is just glorious.

My seat changed colors after about 100 miles. MV is replacing it under warranty so thats no big deal.

The suspension is a little hard. The world isnt going to end over this and I knew it would be when I bought it.

Mine came with a ton of air in the coolant system which resulted in catastrophic overheating. I literally had 0 coolant in my radiator. Bled the system and it was an easy fix.

It has a single sided swing arm and some red paint on the frame. It results in every person under the sun asking what type and how much you paid for your ducati. (my brother has an aprilia mana and gets it too so youll probably be safe with the ktm)

I think the front end is on cocaine. Go north of 8000 rpm in any gear and in any mode and expect the front end to be everywhere. I used to see this as a problem and actually refused to ride the bike until it had a damper on it. Then I laughed and realized it made the bike 1000 times more entertaining to ride.

There are certainly things wrong with the bike that should and probably will be fixed. I would be willing to bet the tuono, ktm, and triumphs are all better executed bikes but at the end of the day 1 you dont have a crisis every time you see your bike 2 you arent doing the world a service and making everything look better by riding the ktm or the aprilia (aprilia really did a terrible job of making the tuono look good) and 3 all the things wrong with the MV make it hilarious and just the best thing to ride around on. The thing is a monster in the canyons. It's comfortable to ride long distances on with little to no pain (I came from an sv650s that I could hardly get 100 miles out of before I needed to get off. I could go all day on the MV). Its deceptively small for how powerful it is (something to the tune of 4 inches shorter wheelbase than the streetfighter 848). Put it into sport mode on a twisty road and no other bike will cross your mind. I'll liken it to my car. I drive a mini cooper s. I could have a golf gti and it would probably be faster in a straight line, quieter for passengers, and more spacious. But I dont because my mini is just ridiculous in every way; anything more than 2000 rpm and you can hear the supercharger from a block away, the exhaust somehow manages to turn the back seat into a vibrator and the thing runs circles around sports coupes in the twisties.

If I was a magazine editor the MV would probably lose in comparison to the other two bikes. If I was a buyer? The MV would earn my money every day of the week.
 

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Yep pretty much what they have said above. The only issue I have had is the gear position sensor (touch wood) mine also has had a white spot appeared under the plastic on the screen, this is being replaced under warranty, just waiting for the display to arrive at the dealer.

It's certainly not the most comfortable of naked bikes either, many complain about the seat but it's fine if your riding it in a spirited fashion. If your just cruising though it's vibrations through the pegs and bars can get to you after a while, especially if you've a pillion on board, so you'll probably be thankful for the break to fuel up after 100 or so miles anyway.

The gearbox is fine, not the best but fine, you have to be positive in your gear changes otherwise you'll find the odd false neutral. Also the gear lever is set way too high from the factory, moving it down an inch or so helps a lot. I can't speak for the factory quickshifter as mine didn't come with one and I bought a Cordona one for mine.

As for how much torque, it can out run a Panigale 1199. I have two friends who have the 1199 and 899 and we were out yesterday, 6th gear, 70mph, open it up and I just cleared off, I didn't even put it in sport mode :)
 

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Yep pretty much what they have said above. The only issue I have had is the gear position sensor (touch wood) mine also has had a white spot appeared under the plastic on the screen, this is being replaced under warranty, just waiting for the display to arrive at the dealer.

It's certainly not the most comfortable of naked bikes either, many complain about the seat but it's fine if your riding it in a spirited fashion. If your just cruising though it's vibrations through the pegs and bars can get to you after a while, especially if you've a pillion on board, so you'll probably be thankful for the break to fuel up after 100 or so miles anyway.

The gearbox is fine, not the best but fine, you have to be positive in your gear changes otherwise you'll find the odd false neutral. Also the gear lever is set way too high from the factory, moving it down an inch or so helps a lot. I can't speak for the factory quickshifter as mine didn't come with one and I bought a Cordona one for mine.

As for how much torque, it can out run a Panigale 1199. I have two friends who have the 1199 and 899 and we were out yesterday, 6th gear, 70mph, open it up and I just cleared off, I didn't even put it in sport mode :)
Not so surprising, the little Brute is geared different. You can even put in in 6th @ 40mph and it still goes pretty strong. :) Good touring capabilities. :)
 

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No way in the world that youll get 200 miles out of the b3. What is interesting is how consistent the MVs mileage across different conditions. I usually manage to get somewhere between 115 and 120 miles before the light comes on (ive gone to 24 past before filling up and never ran out) but whats amazing is I get those numbers no matter what. Boring city riding with the engine <6000? 115 miles. Canyon riding in the 8-10000 range? 115 miles. I even managed to pull 120 miles out of the bike ON A TRACK. Filled the bike up at the track, did 80-90 miles of track riding, and then went home and got 115 miles. I would bet the MV in the hands of an average rider would be substantially easier to ride quickly than the ktm or the tuono just because of how light and ridiculously easy to steer it is.

I will say if youre coming from a triumph that the bike feels way more savage than the triumphs do. I was dead set on buying one of the new daytonas until MV started running their summer deal (<11000 USD for an 800 eas abs) and the MV terrified me. Its just so much more exciting than the triumphs. I would probably say the triumph is a more refined bike than the MV but sweet jesus I would ride the MV over the triumph every day of the week. I would totally say that the MVs transmission pails in comparison to the boxes in the triumphs but I actually think thats a good thing. I didnt like how the triumph box was so smooth you could barely even feel the shift until you hit the upper stop. I compare the triumph box to the MV box because I've heard the Tuono box is also buttery smooth to the point where any preload on the shifter will cause a change. Thats not quite what I'm looking for in a bike.

As far as power between the three goes its kinda a no brainer. Obviously the MV is down on the tuono and the ktm. I would almost fear the ktm makes too much torque. The thought of a naked bike making that much torque is scary when I can bring the front wheel off the ground on my MV at 120 mph in 4th gear. Whichever bike you go with you should have no problem keeping up and passing bikes (the last track day I went to I managed to pass literally everything except a zx10. That includes every japanese 600 and even panigales in less than skilled hands).

Some things I dont like about the MV?

Well the throttle issues arent 100% solved at very low rpms. Maneuvering through parking lots <3000 rpm can get a little jerky. Anything at normal to fast speeds is just glorious.

My seat changed colors after about 100 miles. MV is replacing it under warranty so thats no big deal.

The suspension is a little hard. The world isnt going to end over this and I knew it would be when I bought it.

Mine came with a ton of air in the coolant system which resulted in catastrophic overheating. I literally had 0 coolant in my radiator. Bled the system and it was an easy fix.

It has a single sided swing arm and some red paint on the frame. It results in every person under the sun asking what type and how much you paid for your ducati. (my brother has an aprilia mana and gets it too so youll probably be safe with the ktm)

I think the front end is on cocaine. Go north of 8000 rpm in any gear and in any mode and expect the front end to be everywhere. I used to see this as a problem and actually refused to ride the bike until it had a damper on it. Then I laughed and realized it made the bike 1000 times more entertaining to ride.

There are certainly things wrong with the bike that should and probably will be fixed. I would be willing to bet the tuono, ktm, and triumphs are all better executed bikes but at the end of the day 1 you dont have a crisis every time you see your bike 2 you arent doing the world a service and making everything look better by riding the ktm or the aprilia (aprilia really did a terrible job of making the tuono look good) and 3 all the things wrong with the MV make it hilarious and just the best thing to ride around on. The thing is a monster in the canyons. It's comfortable to ride long distances on with little to no pain (I came from an sv650s that I could hardly get 100 miles out of before I needed to get off. I could go all day on the MV). Its deceptively small for how powerful it is (something to the tune of 4 inches shorter wheelbase than the streetfighter 848). Put it into sport mode on a twisty road and no other bike will cross your mind. I'll liken it to my car. I drive a mini cooper s. I could have a golf gti and it would probably be faster in a straight line, quieter for passengers, and more spacious. But I dont because my mini is just ridiculous in every way; anything more than 2000 rpm and you can hear the supercharger from a block away, the exhaust somehow manages to turn the back seat into a vibrator and the thing runs circles around sports coupes in the twisties.

If I was a magazine editor the MV would probably lose in comparison to the other two bikes. If I was a buyer? The MV would earn my money every day of the week.
Very nicely put. It's a worry sometimes that the forum seems to be full of the negatives, it might be a bit off putting for potential buyers. Hopefully more of this will help straighten things out.
 

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So I was riding to work and remembered I forgot to put down the biggest complaint by a country mile that I have of all the 3 cylinder MVs. So for some idiotic reason the designers of the bike decided that they were going to invert the controls for the horn and for the blinkers. It doesnt sound like a problem until you try and use the horn. Not only is it a mile above where it should be but its also grows out and away from the left handle bar. So basically you have to reach all the way across the left control in order to push the button hard enough to actually use the horn. Long story short it makes the blinkers a lot easier to use but it makes the horn useless. Some people might not have a problem with this but I actually like being able to honk at people who are trying to run me off the road.
 

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I found that but got used to it quickly enough, if you have more than one bike that you switch from regularly then tough, serves you right for showing off with all those bikes ;)
 

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True enough but with an extra 400cc I expected him to be a little closer :)
And the 1199 is a textbook example for what i think is wrong with modern Ducati's. It's not a Twin, it's an inline 4 with 2 cilinders and no bottom power. They should just drop the Twin and go with a V4. Reintroduce the aircooled 2-valve desmo engines with dry clutches for the other models.

Edit:
They would still sell a lot of the sport bikes, maybe even more. It's a Ducati, even if it would fall apart just by looking at it it would sell.
 

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All things noted by nneal12 that may not appeal to riders that are not used to italian bikes is a necessary part to what makes this bikes so exotic and unique. It's the heart, soul and feel. Some things perfectly engineered germans or very precise japanese have yet to learn. For example, can MV make a smoother gear changes ? For sure, they just need to order same parts used by new yamaha mt-09. But I am sure they do not want to. (I can assure you the B3 800 gearbox (and the bike, as a whole) is much more smoother and easier to ride (while at the same time much more exciting) than my other baby duc monster s2r 1000).
So yeah, I have to agree that if and when parallel tests are done in moto magazines, MV does not score highest. However, most editors would choose one for themselves rather than ones they scored better. Why is that ? Because, there is no (yet) metrics to measure "having soul" and "the size of smile it puts on riders face" and this is where agusta wins. By far...
 
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