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Since I know you're all looking to sort the dim and bright light switching problem.
I saw this on Ed Coskers page on Facebook.

"MV TURISMO ESSENTIAL UPGRADE
This part will enable you to keep full beam and dip beam on simultaneously. Thus improving night time vision ???? £20 delivered
Phone 01885410390 NOW!!
limited stock and we expect every Turismo owner to want one"

https://www.facebook.com/superbikesales/?fref=photo

If it's that simple, get one and show me the wire colours and pin shape, and I can make em up and share around for price of plugs and shipping.
 

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We'll see Dons, I'll be at his showroom the day after tomorrow. As it's me who alerted him to the fact that the factory had them in stock and he knows I want one I hope that he's put one aside for me. I was told they'll likely be in this week when discussing work being done this Thursday on the phone last week.

Will get the multimeter out, had assumed that a diode of some sort would be needed to prevent both being on when dipped but then I know feck all about LED lighting systems... Certainly looks like just wires from the picture.
 

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I've ordered one, should arrive tomorrow. I thought £20 posted was reasonable.
 

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When buying my TV from Ed he admitted that the headlight wasn't great but he and other dealers had been in discussion with the factory about a solution that would bring both low and high beams on at once. This is that solution.

He did also admit that the factory would take its time, or the fix might even never see the light of day. I really appreciate his honesty on this and other issues, glad he's my local dealer. Anyway, made my own enquiry with the factory recently via their online enquiry form. Was surprised to even get a response let alone a positive one stating that the part was now available. Looks like the dealer bulletin on this never happened :rolleyes: Let Ed know and he ordered some.

So yes, it's an official MV Augusta part. Not sure of warranty implications of a DIY version though. If the same as the official plug in and play one, removal, in the case of an issue, is an option. Obviously if the adapter caused a short by being incorrectly wired you'd be 'up the creek without a paddle'.
 

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Back from a long afternoon at Ed's. Jamie, his tech, and Sam spent all afternoon sorting warranty issues on my Turismo (indicators x2 and crap alarm removal), discovered that the other front indicator is also on the way out, 2 LEDs remain working out of 6, next warranty claim in the pipe-line. Additionally they fitted the new headlight adapter. This was a first time job for them, so something of a voyage of discovery as there were no instructions provided and this obviously isn't in the workshop manual.







Initial thoughts were that it was located on the back of the headlight so the dash came out (word of warning here, don't unplug dash without a qualified MV tech with a laptop, lead and the proper software as errors can result if you cycle the ignition). The connector on the back of the headlight didn't match.

Next found connector forward of the reg/rec under the left forward panel. Oddly one side of this matched the new adapter but the other didn't... Disconnecting this connector did disable the headlight so in the right ball park.

Next tank came off along with right side panel. No suitable connector found.

Removal of the nose cone was the next line of attack. The pile of parts on the bench was now getting pretty large with Jamie fastidiously organising tubs for fasteners for the various stages/areas.



Finally it was discovered that the first suspect (connector forward of reg/rec on left of bike) was, in fact, what he was looking for. This already has an in-line adapter looking very much like the new one in place. the ends don't match male to female explaining why only one side fitted on the first try. The second connector is not visible without removing the nose cone.


existing adpater





There seems to be something in the black tape other than wiring, possibly a component (diode?), it's vital not to bend this area, rather the wires between it at the male socket.

Both fairing side panels need to be removed, the inner panels with the small storage spaces, two screws on the inner face of the very top of the fairing, there maybe another under the small metal plates on either side as well (sorry missed that bit of the job). There's another screw under front of the nose cone as well I think, Jamie did mention it. Basically, proceed with caution, don't force anything and if it's not moving assume that there's another screw that needs to come out. Sorry that my description isn't comprehensive but at least you know where to look if you've ordered one of these by mail.

Now to test at night... will post on this shortly.

Coskers have already sold quite a few of these so their initial stock is dwindling, get your skates on and call them if you want one. I understand, hopefully accurately, from the the post on this matter and replies to enquiries on their FB page that they will ship abroad if you're having trouble getting one in your country.

Sorry Dons, was getting in the way enough in the workshop to get the multimeter onto the adapter, looks a little more than just wires but not by much. Not too bad value at £20 for the factory part IMHO. maybe one of those ordering via mail will be good enough to test one for you.

Jamie and Sam stayed on after closing just to get my bike sorted, even asked me to take a test ride to make sure everything was OK before packing up, so kudos to them for this effort, much appreciated. Demonstrated that the staff there are willing to go the extra mile. Sam has even offered to come and fit the left front hand-guard if it comes in before my Spanish trip. He lives not to far from my place :yo:
 

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Had to remove my nose-cone over the weekend so now have hands-on experience of this task as opposed to being a bystander whilst others do the work. Watching Jamie and Sam, at Ed Coskers, do it gave me some insight which helped greatly.

The main parts that you will need to remove are, in order:

1/ left and right fairing infills (the ones with the small stowage pockets) - in each; four 4mm done head Allen bolts, rear one through fairing into well nut in infill. Beware the inner one to the front, one slip and it'll fall into the channel right next to it and disappear. Access is tight so this is a distinct possibility. Extracting one from in there is hard, don't ask me why... Only consolation is that Sam did exactly the same thing last week. Once the four small bolts are out slide the edge of the infill inwards and forwards to disengage it from the fairing and the infill to the front side of the tank. Repeat on other side of the bike.

2/ left and right fairing outer side panels - removed the row of three 4mm dome head Allen bolts from the side of the fairing. The front one is difficult to access unless you have a very long Allen key or a screw driver type tool with the correct bit (I have one of the latter, Aldi special, perfect for this job). There is another 4mm bolt accessed from underneath toward the front between the fairing outer side panel and the radiator cover/inner side panel (B). The outer side panels are, once you've removed the above, retained by two rubber grommets that engage with pegs. One at the rear top attaching to the side of the fuel tank, the other at the bottom beside the bottom of the radiator. Be especially careful removing the panel on the right hand side, the Bluetooth module is mounted on the inner face and will need to be unplugged to allow complete removal. There is enough cable slack to allow for this but not much..

3/ nose-cone - remove the two screws from the black plastic part to the lower front of the nose-cone that attach to the top of the radiator cover/inner side panel (E). Inside the fairing, either side of the dash there is an Allen bolt going though the cast bracket that the dash is mounted to, these need to be removed taking great care not to slip and scratch the display (D). Remove the 4mm Allen bolts from inside the very top of the nose cone (C). There are cables connected to the nose-cone assembly, these run under the black plastic inner mid panel (16), on the left side, to their respective components (air temp sensor and, on the Lusso, the GPS antenna). The connectors for these are small but fairly easy to undo, they are under the left infill piece with the pocket. Finally remove the Allen bolt that's directly under the headlight (A), you'll need to get down low to see this, it's right underneath. I found it best, at this stage, to raise the screen to its highest position. Now, standing in front of the bike, straddling the front wheel, ease the upper sides of the nose-cone around the screen and its surround whilst pulling the whole assembly towards you and off the bike.



Assembly is reverse of the above.

With the exception of the Allen bolt under the headlight (A) and unplugging cables everything above needs to carried out on both sides of the bike, i.e. it's symmetrical. I've described, and annotated in the schematic, one side only.

I found that quite a few of the 4mm bolts that tightened onto the fairing were missing the little nylon washers that help protect the paintwork. I bought some off eBay, marginally thicker and slightly bigger outside diameter but they work well.

I also found that the 4mm bolts that screwed into rubber well-nuts were the longer of the two, the shorter ones screwed into threaded clips. Makes perfect sense but consider this on reassembly so that all fasteners have enough thread available to do up. Be very careful to get this right, using the shorter ones, on the screws at (E), both sides, 4 in all, accidentally use the long ones for these and you'll probably scratch your fork legs when the bars are turned.

The screws into well-nuts do a good job of holding themselves, don't over tighten these. The others don't need to be too tight but you can feel these, into threaded clips, 'nip up' easier.
 

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Thanks for posting this Chas, finally got around to fitting mine this afternoon, took about an hour with the help of your instructions.
 

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I was at Ed Cosker's last week and Jamie, their tech, told me that he has now perfected his technique on the install of these (mine was the first) and can do them in 10-15 minutes. He said that the nose cone doesn't actually need to come off, it's fiddly but doable. TBH, nose cone removal isn't that hard, just lots of those tiny screws, but maybe worth trying before you get that stage. If you find yourself struggling then remove it anyway.
 

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I find my F4 headlight to be exceptionally bright.
The Turismo has LED lighting, the future apparently... Brightness is sufficient but the fact that, out of the factory for '15 and '16 MY, the high beam is a tightly focused giving practically no illumination outside of what is in effect a spot-light.

Without this adapter low beam gives the low beam pattern and high beam gives just the high beam pattern. With the adapter, when switched to high beam the two patterns are used together so you don't just have a pool of light further up the road but the two overlaid. One does wonder why this wasn't part of the original design....

TBH I have yet to use this in anger other than testing in an underground car-park in Spain a couple of weeks ago. As it's summer here it's light up until gone 10pm here currently. It's got to be an improvement and for the minimal outlay well worth it IMHO.
 
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I'm a bit disappointed with it, was hoping it would have been better, don't know why I thought that as it's the same as holding the passing light on maybe cause I had only held the pass light on for a short time. looks like Clearwater will be getting a bell.


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You'll probably find now the battery goes flat as you ride ;) :D
 

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I finally got to test the headlight in anger last night. A 325 mile round trip for a BBQ saw me coming home after dark.

Whilst, as Bruce says, it could be better I can confirm that it's a huge improvement over what it was.

The few bits of main road over the Cotswolds where I could use full beam gave a good spread of light, both far, near and off to close left and right that previously had been tight and fairly distant pattern with no peripheral illumination.

The quality of the light does seem a bit 'milky'. I've noticed that LED torches seem to exhibit the same type of light with decent throw but a lower apparent quality. Maybe it's the colour temperature that's the issue here as surely distance is a result of lumens light output?

Nearer to home where the roads are narrower and twisty everything was fine on the straighter sections but on corners the effect of the high beam spot effect combined with the cut off low beam does leave, when leaning into the bend, the further part and exit of the corner in relative darkness until you're most of the way round. For this to improve a revised high beam reflector would be required but probably resulting in a reduction in throw. Auxiliary lights would be useful in resolving this. The cornering lights on the Multistrada DVT and KTM Super Adventure now make a lot of sense.

I've previously been spoilt by quad H7s on my VFR/Interceptor, those were superb headlights.

For the limited amount of night riding that I do I'm happy with the end result and still consider the adapter very much a worthwhile upgrade, especially given the relatively low cost.
 
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