MV Agusta Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
HI all,

I've always found my 2001 F4750 reluctant (minor understatement) to turn into corners. It always wanted to stand up. A couple of friends had ridden it and declared it unridable, such was the resistance to smooth cornering.

I've since removed the steering damper and all is well and I have enjoyed a track day at Oulton Park!

Has anyone else experienced such a change in handling? Is this just the way the bike is (I doubt) or should I send my steering damper off for a strip down and service?


Cheers


Rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,924 Posts
If it works better without it leave it off. If you start experiencing headshake under hard acceleration then you will need to put a new one back on
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
I also run the same year / model as you.

I have mucked aroung with the suspension set up to get an improvement but it still needs a bit more work.

my preload on the rear was too heavy , also rebound and compression. backed them all of a bit and got a good result.

now to sort out my tyre issues

I have also posted a thread today so keep an eye out on this also and see what comes out as I think you may find some information that you will be able to use come out of that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,695 Posts
Those are unusual symptoms of a steering damper problem. I think your problem lies elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,111 Posts
A steering damper would only affect turn-in (turn-in, in my book, is the transition from straight to turn) if it were completely frozen, wouldn't it?

A well-functioning steering damper affects the movement of the front wheel in its extremities; a non-functioning steering damper has no effect whatsoever.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,072 Posts
HI all,

I've always found my 2001 F4750 reluctant (minor understatement) to turn into corners. It always wanted to stand up. A couple of friends had ridden it and declared it unridable, such was the resistance to smooth cornering.

I've since removed the steering damper and all is well and I have enjoyed a track day at Oulton Park!

Has anyone else experienced such a change in handling? Is this just the way the bike is (I doubt) or should I send my steering damper off for a strip down and service?


Cheers


Rich
Try this mate
http://www.mvagusta.net/forum/showthread.php?t=41145
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,955 Posts
If the steering damper is too " stiff" then when applying counter pressure the bike would not tip into the turn as well because the lateral force on the gyro ( wheel ) is being resisted by the steering damper and therefore the force is not there to precess the 90 degrees and tip the bike ie bank it.
If once established in the turn the bike was trying to stand up then as stated the problem lies elsewhere..?

I'd personally be looking closely at head bearings and swing arm pivot then rear shock and front and would give the bike a close inspection to all fasteners.

I'm sure the guys who race these bikes will give you some good advice
joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,695 Posts
Correct me if I'm wrong gents, but a properly adjusted steering damper can not be felt when slowly moving the handle bars right to left. It's purpose is to damp sever vibrations and thereby mitigate head shake and the dreaded tank slapper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,924 Posts
Correct me if I'm wrong gents, but a properly adjusted steering damper can not be felt when slowly moving the handle bars right to left. It's purpose is to damp sever vibrations and thereby mitigate head shake and the dreaded tank slapper.
I believe you are correct sir. Maybe it's frozen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Correct me if I'm wrong gents, but a properly adjusted steering damper can not be felt when slowly moving the handle bars right to left. It's purpose is to damp sever vibrations and thereby mitigate head shake and the dreaded tank slapper.
Indeed. The steering damper is a simple shock absorber. When you move the handle bars, a rod is pushing fluid through a hole (and around discs) causing friction/resistance (damping) to that movement. The faster you move the bars the more resistance (damping force) is created. So while there is less damping force at slow handle bar movements there is still some which does indeed make the bike turn in slower as the steering damper slows down your counter steering input (to make the bike lean over). Taking the steering damper off will indeed make the bike turn in faster/easier however, you put yourself at greater risk of a tank slapper. At least on my steering damper there is a knob adjuster that can increase or decrease said damping forces. My strategy is to start with the adjuster all the way loose (turn lefty-loosey) to allow for the fastest turn-in and then slowly increase a click at a time as I feel the bars getting to wobbly (engineering technical term) for my tastes. Turn in speed will be effected so its a compromise.

Why the steering damper would cause your bike to stand up mid corner I am not sure about. I could guess that at mid corner (where you should be getting on the throttle) is causing your bike to run wide because of possible too tight steering damper resisting your counter steering. But then your bike would probably be slow to turn in as well. But if removing the damper fixes the problem, the damper may have been adjusted too tight or frozen up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
You dont say if you tried adjusting the damper or that it can't adjust .
If it is cranked fully on it will affect the handling and if its unadjustable from that position then yes its better off the bike.

Its like ABS, you dont really need it but it might save your ass one day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,111 Posts
As I said, it's effect should only be noticeable in extreme situations, to prevent tank slappers, something you'd have a hard time provoking of your own accord. In normal spirited riding a well adjusted steering damper isn't noticed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
my friends 916 had his ohlins o-ring swell up causing the steering dampner ineffective.. similiar to what your experiencing. You could send the entire unit back and have it rebuilt. I don't think it costed too much.

andy
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,072 Posts
Triple,

Thanks for alerting me to this thread! I had a friend who is experienced in suspension settings set everything up so it would be neutral. Removing the steering damper made big improvements for me, maybe give that a go? I'd be interested to see if you find yours turns in better?

I also have Pirelli Corsa's. What tyre pressures do you run? I have 36/46


Rich
Stupid question but I presume you checked your tyre pressures??!!!
And that was a worry too :wtf:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I'm going to double check the tyre pressures I'm currently running.

What do other Pirelli Corsa riders run on the road? I always used to swear by 32/36, but was adviced to raise it to what I believe to be 36/42.

Be interested to know your experiences.


Rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Indeed. The steering damper is a simple shock absorber. When you move the handle bars, a rod is pushing fluid through a hole (and around discs) causing friction/resistance (damping) to that movement. The faster you move the bars the more resistance (damping force) is created. So while there is less damping force at slow handle bar movements there is still some which does indeed make the bike turn in slower as the steering damper slows down your counter steering input (to make the bike lean over). Taking the steering damper off will indeed make the bike turn in faster/easier however, you put yourself at greater risk of a tank slapper. At least on my steering damper there is a knob adjuster that can increase or decrease said damping forces. My strategy is to start with the adjuster all the way loose (turn lefty-loosey) to allow for the fastest turn-in and then slowly increase a click at a time as I feel the bars getting to wobbly (engineering technical term) for my tastes. Turn in speed will be effected so its a compromise.

Why the steering damper would cause your bike to stand up mid corner I am not sure about. I could guess that at mid corner (where you should be getting on the throttle) is causing your bike to run wide because of possible too tight steering damper resisting your counter steering. But then your bike would probably be slow to turn in as well. But if removing the damper fixes the problem, the damper may have been adjusted too tight or frozen up.

Just checked the removed steering damper. It's set fully anti-clockwise, so at it's softest setting.

Maybe a reconditioning or oil change as per Donsy's post would be in order.


Rich
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top