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I found myself watching the wing flex.....
 

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Not funny. I recently was on a flight taking off from Newark and our plane ended up in the jet wash of the plane which took off before us. I fly every week and don't scare easily, but this was the first time I thought we were going down. Not a good experience.
 

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Not funny. I recently was on a flight taking off from Newark and our plane ended up in the jet wash of the plane which took off before us. I fly every week and don't scare easily, but this was the first time I thought we were going down. Not a good experience.

I bet. The most risky phase of a flight is the take off and climb out.

Wake turbulence as it is known occurs when vortices of air spill off the wing tips...The winglets we see on modern jets are designed to reduce this effect as the vortices cause drag and that's not good for fuel efficiency either.
Wake turbulence is at it's most hazardous on days of calm winds.

Then the little suckers can just spin arround in the vicinity of the runway...

joe
 

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This is what happens when a 120-ton Boeing 767 encounters severe turbulence just before touching down on Runway 15 at Birmingham Airport in England?

Just look at the suspension and tyres under stress.!!!!!

http://www.flixxy.com/boeing-767-landing-gear-banged-to-its-limits.htm


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Yes that's my home airport at Brum. The prevailing winds are from the southwest 230 deg , so that's why the plane is crabbed to the right on approach to "lay off" the drift from the centre line.

Having one wing down just prior to touchdown is correct as when the pilot kicks the rudder to straighten the plane up with the centre line to get the second wheel down he then has to lay off the left drift and that bank to the right is how he does it.

He was working for his pennies that day but these guys are highly trained and very good at what they do. No worries at all.

The decision in a severe crosswind as to whether to continue the aproach or to " go around" depends on the rudder authority of the aeroplane. Each type will have a demonstrated crosswind capabilty.

If the rudder hasn't got the clout to straighten the plane up with the centre line the undercarriage could get over stressed when the second wheel contacts.

B52 Bombers had a wheel to turn the undercarriage into the runway direction while the plane has heading off the drift. ie it could land slightly askew and no issues.

joe
 

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That is some serious yaw right there.
 

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Back in the early 80s I would visit the Yamaha dealer in Ft Worth Texas, located on a road that led directly to the end of the runway at Carswell AFB....the B52s would practice touch and go's in cross winds.....unbelievable to watch those things coming in over our heads literally side ways to the runway, wheel carriages rotated to the side, then snapping straight at touch down just to power up in a cloud of jet fuel smoke to take back off and do it all again.
 

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John;
if it was a 767-400ER it could take off at 450,000lbs 105 tons more

nice bit of landing!:jsm:
 

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"We've got the best pilots. No need to conform to the West." :smoking:

Here's one I like to watch. http://youtu.be/MOQW6-SBjVY

Makes you wonder Art why they didn't develop the 06/24 runway back in the day. That one is closed now and the airport is left with just 15/33
 
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