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crash said:
i think that with 30 frames per second u can't have a good video....it's like a webcam..
Don't write it off just yet...30 fps sounds fairly decent. I think 24 fps is standard in cinema film. Anyone know how this frames per second compares to a normal handycam?
 

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25 fps here in the UK probably 30fps on NTSC. Looks good to me but 640 480 is a bit on the low side and it must use compression to make use of even 2Gb. Old fashion tv was around 640 480 though I think. Normal DV broadcast quality is 12Gig per hour. But to get rid of all the wires is great. I use a RAM mount to mount my bullet cam and have filmed from the mirror stem but this is on a 750 with no vibration. I do a lot of filming but it is a pain to wire in the hard disc recorder and bullet cam and a small screen to check on set up. Even worse when I used a DV camcorder (and it wrecked the camera).
 

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i just know that my webcam has the same characteristics of that cam (3o fps and 640*480 resolution)...and for high speed motion i won't consider its use...
 

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spalding,i have that atc 2000 cam,ive tried mounting on the right hand engine frame,at low speeds around town i was amazed at how good the quality was for the money,but at hi speeds it hasnt recorded,it swiches itself off,it must be the vibes,i have put the piece of rubber around the frame,but i need to play more with it,but yes its a great self contained very inexpensive cam.
 

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john348 said:
The details on the page that gave me the other link said it was not very good at vibration.
Vibration goes with the territory. Mounting the cam on the center of the motorcycle (i.e., above the tank) helps greatly and a rubber pad will help a bit more. Or you can get a helmet-mounted mini cam. Your head corrects the angle somewhat while your neck absorbs a lot of vibration before it gets to the camera. And some cameras have (cheap) built-in electronic image stabilization systems.

I know of lots of true image stabilizers for cameras for everything from speedboats to helicopters but I don't know of anything for sportbikes. Most stabilizing systems start with the premise that everything will be done to make the shot as smooth as possible prior to the addition of the stabilizer system. The inherent nature of a sportbike - rapid changes in lean angle, high speeds over bumpy roads, abrupt fore-and-aft changes in attitude - is not something those types of image stabilization systems are designed to deal with.

Steadicam and Glidecam make small rigs but they would be worn and operated by a passenger as you can't operate one of those and ride. And no sudden moves. ;0

I don't think that' s what Greg's looking for.

Again, best move is to mount the camera in the center of the bike and use a rubber block to absorb whatever vibration you can. That or low-res helmet cam.
 
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