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Formerly - dagmvagusta
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2012 f4 1000r. I went up 2 in the back from stock 41 to 43 while changing the chain and front sprocket also (kept stock at 15) and still with 525 but new did chain. However I'm thinking in dropping the front sprocket to a 14. I have a gearing calculator that gives me all the drive train ratio info but wanted to know if anyone has dropped down to a 14. My reasoning is quick acceleration in and out of traffic. I know these bikes pick up real well in the top end but let's face it your not hitting 165mph on the average streets. Any feedback would be appreciated.




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There have been people who have done it. I would not. The tighter radius on the sprocket, seems to me, would cause unwanted wear. If you are looking for a quicker power hit in traffic, stay in a gear that keeps the revs in the "happy" range (8000-9000 rpm) and the bike will behave better, on acceleration and deceleration, for you too.
 

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15x43?

I would rather ride a ten speed than a supermoto. You ask for advice and get .....
......advice:f4:
and more advice....

don't go to 14.....look in Machinery's Handbook....you never run an even number of teeth on the driving cog

Chuck;
in LA's average freeway traffic (~83mph) my Brutale (15x43) is turning a tad over 6,000rpm, a little throttle....what traffic?? i'm seeing triple digits:naughty:
 

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Formerly - dagmvagusta
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Discussion Starter #5
What book are you referring to please share. I have has several other bikes Gsxr 1000, r1, my race bike zx6r all of which have an even number in the front sprocket stock from the factory.


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While I know a bunch of people who have done it on Ducati Monsters (which were geared way too high to meet Euro3). General consensus is to avoid the 14 front if you can find your desired ratio by swapping the rear. Listen to Noel. :f4:
 

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Formerly - dagmvagusta
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Discussion Starter #7
My ratio calculated is pretty accurate and a big rear is not what ideal I'm my opinion either. Thanks for the replies ill play with the gearing just as I do on the track to find a desired feel.

Thanks again.


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even # of teeth?

What book are you referring to please share. I have has several other bikes Gsxr 1000, r1, my race bike zx6r all of which have an even number in the front sprocket stock from the factory.
dagmvagusta;
i already told you;
Machinery's Handbook
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machinery's_Handbook

the machinist's and engineers Bible

the current edition #29 has 2704 pages:jsm:

http://www.mscdirect.com/product/65...t_sesEJpRBZ_PLA__25122950944_c_S&026=nv&025=c

dagmvagusta;
look at your chain, links are in pairs right? using a sprocket with an odd number of teeth evens the wear, therefore extends the life of the chain AND sprockets

the reason you see even numbers of teeth on driving sprockets?

manufacturers don't spend money on real, experienced engineers, they get kids right out of college that can't work a pencil sharpener. because they're cheaper to hire

they spend it on advertising and umbrella girls:)drummer:)

hell, on my Aprilia RSVR the sprockets don't even align:wtf:

but if you flip the rear sprocket so the cutout is against the carrier they do align:naughty:
yes, the CS sprocket has 16 teeth too

and the thermostat is on the radiator OUTLET go figure that one out:jerkoff::jerkoff::jerkoff:

PS;
i used to sell motorcycle chain......in 250' rolls:naughty:
 

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Formerly - dagmvagusta
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Discussion Starter #10
Picked up copy last night from a mechanic that seems to have every mechanic book in the world and read up on it. Good information talked about wear and damage to the chain and uneven over time. However, I change my sprockets and chain every riding season along with new tires and I don't ride the MV as much as I do my track bike and HP4 on the street so well see. Thanks for the heads up in the book.


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We have a copy of that in our bookshelf.
 

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I thought as long as you don't have a "hunting ratio" (rear teeth evenly divisible by the front) your going to spread the wear along the whole chain anyway.
I mean just going with odd # front sprocket without taking into account what's on the rear seems like your not looking at the "big picture".
 

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Formerly - dagmvagusta
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Discussion Starter #13
I would agree Bsr that's why I said I'm still going to play with the gearing. I have other bikes with correct ratio that are odd and even in the front with no problems. It's all about knowing your bike testing the application you desire accurately.


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?

I thought as long as you don't have a "hunting ratio" (rear teeth evenly divisible by the front) your going to spread the wear along the whole chain anyway.
I mean just going with odd # front sprocket without taking into account what's on the rear seems like your not looking at the "big picture".
I would agree Bsr that's why I said I'm still going to play with the gearing. I have other bikes with correct ratio that are odd and even in the front with no problems. It's all about knowing your bike testing the application you desire accurately.
you guys are smarter than all the collected mechanical engineering in history?

really????:naughty:

dagmvagusta......and you change your chain and sprockets every season? you have more money to piss up a rope than i do

i get 30,000mi out of Regina Extra 525

my F4S has an C/R SPR gear box, 15x40, probably put the stock 6th in it......close ratio 5 speed and over drive, just for fun

:drummer:
 

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you guys are smarter than all the collected mechanical engineering in history?

really????:naughty:
I guess so..:)
I haven't read the material that you referenced and apparently a lot of OEM manufacturers haven't either.

I don't see how the chain knows it got an odd or even number on just the front sprocket.
I mean if it has a preferential number on the front why does it not have a preference (odd or even) for the rear?


I'll plead ignorance here and throw myself on the mercy of the court. :confused:
 

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Formerly - dagmvagusta
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Discussion Starter #16
theknurl that's correct on the yearly replacement. Tires to. It's just personal preference, small money to pay in comparison to my life on two wheels :)


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?

I don't see how the chain knows it got an odd or even number on just the front sprocket.
I mean if it has a preferential number on the front why does it not have a preference (odd or even) for the rear?
John;
look at roller chain, the links are pairs, if there is an even number on the front the same links will hit the same teeth each time
if the front is odd it doesn't it spreads the wear on the sprocket and lowers the load on the chain
don't forget the load on the teeth is much higher at the front than the ratio of sprocket teeth because of chain wrap
thats why you worry about the front not the rear

dagmvagusta;
in the '70s i was heavily involved in Endurance Racing, thats 3,000mi in a day, we changed chains when they needed it
we broke chains in on the street (to get rid of initial stretch)
we used Nylon rear sprockets with the urethane rubber cush drive pressed in

http://img0047.popscreencdn.com/113...egli-1000-bol-dor-godier-genoud-card-ebay.jpg

Egli Kawasaki serial #H407Y, 3 time Bol d'Or winner
 

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Formerly - dagmvagusta
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Discussion Starter #18
Well I have seen new bikes chain pop right off show room floor. New chains just installed popped. And on race days plenty of new chains popped on the track. So just a small precaution for a peace of mind. Well worth It for me.


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John;
look at roller chain, the links are pairs, if there is an even number on the front the same links will hit the same teeth each time
if the front is odd it doesn't it spreads the wear on the sprocket and lowers the load on the chain
don't forget the load on the teeth is much higher at the front than the ratio of sprocket teeth because of chain wrap
thats why you worry about the front not the rear
So completely ignore the rear (as if it's not there) because the same links will hit the same front teeth every time (if even #) regardless of the rear tooth count.
So the so called "hunting ratio" is a myth?

This is assuming that there's some wear or flaw that the sprocket can transfer to the chain? In a perfect world it would make no difference?

Thanks for walking me through this.
 
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