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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm on a F3 673 and like to ask does any1 had this issue when downshift, the gear doesn't kicks in completely untill i release my clutch. For example when i'm on 5th gear, i downshift to 3rd gear, but when i enter 4th, it can't enter 3rd without me releasing the clutch to let the gear kicks in to 4th and re-clutch to downshift again. Not always happens, about 2-3 times out of 5. And also when i'm moving off from gear 1 to gear 2, the gear will suddenly jumps back to neutural during 2nd gear. I'm not really good at technical. Can any1 advise me on this issue please? Thanks alot
 

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I have it happen occasionally on my B3 800. Had it happen on my sv650 as well. I find myself just letting the clutch out to the point where it barely starts to engage and then the gear pops in just fine. My guess is that it has something to do with racking down the gears without actually going into each gear.

As for the up shifting issue, a bunch of the B3 guys have the same issue whether eas or not, a good firm shift seems to sort the issue nicely. If you recently got the bike you should adjust the shift lever. They come from the factory hilariously high and can make it seem like youre shifting all the way into the next gear when in reality you arent even close. I managed to hit neutral while leaving the dealer on a test ride AND while leaving the dealer after buying the bike. It was pretty awesome.
 

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My guess is hes doing it whilst approaching a stoplight or some sort of stop. I know if I come up to a stoplight I rarely will engine brake my way but rather just drop down through the gears to whatever is appropriate for the speed.
 

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I had this happen once on the street when a car whipped out in front of me then stopped. I went from 3rd to first in one go but the bike wouldnt come out of second into first without me releasing the clutch so it would catch 2nd gear then go to first. Not a big issue as it isnt common practice in riding.
 

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The gear box relies on a certain amount of motion (spinning gears) to effect a smooth shift. If there isn't enough momentum in your gear box, the shift can cause everything to stop spinning while the clutch is activated. This can cause the next shift to try to engage at a point where the gear teeth do not mesh thereby blocking the shift.

You don't have to fully release the clutch to make the process work. You just have to gain some spinning momentum...just feather out a tad and shift your next gear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My guess is hes doing it whilst approaching a stoplight or some sort of stop. I know if I come up to a stoplight I rarely will engine brake my way but rather just drop down through the gears to whatever is appropriate for the speed.
Unless you're racing, you really should release the clutch between downshifts. Ive never heard or seen anybody do what you do on the road.
Yea donsy, nneal12 is right. So i guess this is normal. Kept thinking somethings wrong with my gearbox. If nt gotto solve it b4 my warrenty ends at Oct.
 

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You need to look at a gear box assembly and see how the gears are actually engaged to understand what is happening......virtually every motorcycle transmission in use today work in the same manner, although certain construction details may differ.

Engagement dogs and/or windows on facing gears must mesh as one gear is slid towards the next. Since all the gears are spinning at differing rpms, the dogs and/or windows don't constantly line up. Some transmissions are manufactured in a way that makes the engagement quick and smooth, some are very rough. Even within the same transmission you can have one or two gears that line up poorly and the rest that readily slip together.

Bottom line is both shafts and all gears need to be in motion for shifting to occur through all the gears, and rpms of each shaft vary the ease of engagement for each individual gear.

If you ever have opportunity to view a transmission in an open case where you can operate the shifting mechanism you will clearly understand how you can occasionally have poor engagement of some gear at some rpm.
 

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I regularly have problems with the gearbox on my F3 800 which are very similar to the problems you describe. TBH its the worst gearbox i've ever used, my 1962 Triumph Tiger Cub gearbox is genuinely better. I think its just pot luck wether you get a good one or a bad one.
You could try adjusting the chain tension and the gear lever position to make it easier to select a gear.
 
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