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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello to you all,

I am from Portugal, am 25 years old, finished law school and decided to get something special. Something I always dreamed about even when I was not thinking of it. Yes, I want a MV Agusta F4.
Over the years I tried (being "pushed" by family and friends to do so) to convince myself that I was more into cars than into bikes.
Well I also love cars (and everything with an engine really), but now I realized that it is time to have a bike. And that is the same as saying that I need an MV agusta. You will never feel the freedom you feel on a bike with a car, nor the rush, the amazing mobility, the roaring sound or, above all, the simplicity.

So, why an MV? Well it seems obvious but I can't have enough of saying the "why":

It represents something like the perfect harmony between classic, historical bikes and state of the art technology. I can't really define what it is but I'm sure pretty much all MV owners feel the same.

It's timeless

It's italian, it's fast, it's beautiful. And it's special.

Beside expressing my passion for this bike, the reason I'm here is this: I have been reading this forum for some time now so I can learn more about the F4, know about the common problems, owners impressions etc... I do want, when the time comes, to make a wise buy, and not to get one of those who seems cursed, just because I where too impulsive.
So, I need your advise.
I will probably end getting an F4 1000S or a 1000R, of year 2005 or 2006: for me it is the most desirable, because of the design and because of the lack of traction controls, fly-by-wire connections etc...
I like it simple.
It is easy to find one with very few km's as none of the bikes for sale have more than 20000 km's. Most of them have a max. of 8000 km on the clock, so that is not a problem.
What I fear is to buy a bike that suffers one of those recurrent problems, like a cracked radiator, and I would really like to avoid that.
So my plan is to check for oil leaks and coolant leaks before I test drive it, then when driving it let it get somewhat hot (going slowly), then drive faster to see if it cools down and then, in the end, check again for leaks. Will this be sufficient to exclude rad problems/other leakings? What else do you advise to inspect? (rear wheel hub?)

I am more inclined to the 1000R because of the HP, but the 1000S has the most beautiful rims. Do you have any advise on that? Is one more prone to any trouble than the other?

I am not buying my first MV today, and not tomorrow either. I'm gonna be slow on this one, so I do it right and well informed. But I made my mind and will own one. Therefore I would really appreciate any help, information, any kind of guidance and advice on this.

Thank you very much for your time!
 

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Hi and welcome Arnould,
Am I right in thinking this is your first ever motorcycle? If that is the case a 1000cc motorcycle is a big and scary starter machine.
jimboF4
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Hi Jimbo,
Yes, it is my first motorcycle. I won't argue saying that I drove this and that (wich I did). It's insane and I know it. But for me, that's part of the thrill.
I read and heard all possible arguments not to have this bike and I appreciate the advice as I know they are based mainly on safety. But there is things a man just has to do.
So, I would greatly appreciate any input on the above questions!
Thank you!
 

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Hi,
Most MV's tend to be well cared for, but as with any bike with a few years on it condition is king. Look for service records and bills/receipts for work done. If it has good service history it should be a reliable bike. There will be many who favour one model more than the other, the S as far as I know did not suffer from radiator cracks, that was mainly the 1000R (I know myself). But any R bike may well have had a modified radiator fitted under warranty, mine did.

As for which is better the S has better torque and Ieasier to ride on the road. The R has better brakes/forks and only makes more power when really run hard by which time you are really moving and a target for the police.

My advice is try to talk to some Portuguese or Spanish MV owners and you might get some knowledge of a good bike for sale that they know has been cared for. Don't rush and buy the first one you see, that is to easy to do. Take your time and good luck.

Either way do take it easy, these are phenomenal bikes.

jimboF4
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well what you just said about the 1000S might just be the argument I needed. After all any F4 is impressive, no matter what version and I don't think I need (I really don't) that extra power of the "R" version. Plus, the not prone to crack radiator, better torque and beautiful rims sound perfect to me.
As for servicing, there is a F4 1000S for sale with 5,000 km (3.107 miles) on it, at this point what kind of servicing should it have on the book?
I will take it easy, the more time I wait the better will be the buy.

Thank you for the good advice, have a nice day.
 

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Servicing is both mileage and time related, so at least evey year on a low milage bike. I don't know how good at basic mechanics you are and if you have a basic tool kit available.
The good news is the bikes are really easy and a pleasure to work on, with the manuals you need all available in the maintenance section here from donsy. The folks here know a great deal about these bikes and can help advise on nearly everything you need.
The bike has some well know faults and issues but any previous owner should be aware of these and taken steps to sort them. Items such as well nuts, the rear hub are just two. There is a wealth of information on this site and if you stuck just ask on here.
jimboF4
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I am aware of the manuals available, I already downloaded them and have been reading them (it's a nice read by the way). I always loved mechanics (all kind of two stroke and a BMW 2002) but, as I didn't do studies in that area, my knowledge is limited (self-learner). I understand the basics and have the greatest interest in learning more. Also, I learned from experience that, with the correct knowledge, you will always work better, with greater attention to details, than a third-party (and will save money, which is good too).
I can already see myself servicing my bike and keeping it in pristine condition: with the help of the forum's members of course.
And yes, I have tools.
When you say "well nuts" do you mean ALL the well nuts of the bike or any one in specific?
As to the rear wheel hub, is it obvious when in need of servicing? Does it get any play, does it do noise?
And... Should I look for any other "typical" problem?
 

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I find this thread puzzling. Very much so.
I know I risk getting a reputation as a sissy. Nevertheless, in the name of honesty I just have to say this.
An F4 is just about the last think to be given to a novice. By now most European countries have introduced laws forcing people to start and learn the basics with more forgiving machines. For a very good reason.
Driving schools don't use Ferraris or Lambos either.
 

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Congratulations on finishing law school.
You studied for years to gain that qualification. I believe that you'd always advise your client to have a competent lawyer advice them & represent them in a court? Yes?
You're asking for advice here from some very competent people and here is my input:
Don't buy an F4 first up.

That will be 700 Euro, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Pepe and Castle,

You are probably right. The F4 is a very powerful machine and it also has a special character that probably makes a Ninja or a CBr XX easier bikes to care for and to ride also.
I don't think I can argue on the fact I should not, as a novice, have a 1000cc super bike, much less an MV Agusta.
But still...
I've rode Ducati's, CBR's (600 and XX) and Honda R's, a Hornet, two stroke honda CR 500 (mine) and 250, CRf's 450 and a VFr. It was a nice experience to ride them all but, even if I didn't own any of them (except the CR500), I wouldn't want to.
I may not have the experience you think I should have before I ride a certain bike, but I certainly don't want to have a R6 for a year or two just because I shouldn't get an F4 without having experience on a smaller, more forgivable bike. Why not? Because I never had a crush on a R6!
You are right, this is not responsible, it's "puzzling" and it should be forbidden (as to knowing the basics, I think I do... At least I got my motorcycle license). I hear you. I would give the same advice to any novice, because I would be concerned with their safety. You shouldn't mess around with bikes.
But as I said I really had a crush on this bike, since the first time I saw it.
We were 16 and the father of a friend of mine had a brand new F4, some special edition (it had a little metal plate with the numbering), I don't remember which one but I'm pretty sure it was a 750. He never rode the bike and did not let anyone ride it. One day, my friend decided to take the bike for a spin. We were all very impressed of course, and the adventure had dramatic consequences (he returned home safely, the problem was his father). It's one of those simple things you don't forget, at the time it really was something.

Anyway since then I was alway tempted to buy a bike, like a Monster or something, but let it go and thought "nop, one day I'll have an F4".

And now, I can...

But I appreciate your opinion, and would get puzzled if you didn't express some disapprovement on this. If of any help, rest assured that I know what I am getting into.

And Castle, as a lawyer you should try to get what your client wants, so you can forget about the 700 Euro!

Any advice related to buying the thing would be greatly appreciated! I really want to be well informed before taking the next step. Thanks for the help.
 

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It should not be a problem. Its all in the right hand, if you can control it you will be fine.
The S or the R both good. Buy the one you like most.
 

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I wouldn't go near an R6 as a learner bike either.
Here in little old New Zealand we have a graduated system that will not allow you, as a learner, to ride a bike over a certain amount of horsepower, and you can't graduate to a full license without well over a year on that bike. So I struggle with countries that allow anyone to ride any bike as a novice.

I love that you have a passion for motorcycles and even more so because the bike you are most passionate about is an MV Agusta.
I believe that you're caught up in the passion of owning one of the beautiful bikes and that's fine but geez - all things being equal you've got at least another 50 years on the planet - what's the rush?
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thanks Maximum, that is what I think too. I intend to drive responsibly, not taking the risk of braking too late or too hard, cornering too fast, power-sliding when going out of corner, being stupid on highway... Just gonna be very civilized, making nice and smooth lines and learn with time.
And you are right Castel, I was caught up by passion! I don't think I am in a rush: if I have all my life, I rather start now. So when I'm in my 50's I can go enjoy my bike (which I hope will still be an MV) in the mountain roads (plenty of beautiful endless mountain roads here, just by the sea), backed up by 25 years of experience and great motorcycle memories.

Anyway, this will take the time it takes... I am currently checking what is available and learning from different sources. I am not in a hurry, just determined to have an F4.
Besides, the fact that "the bikes are really easy and a pleasure to work on" (Jimbo) seems great to me. And a lot of the forum members seem to confirm that. Most of the time I have to read, write and study. When the time comes to spend an afternoon on my car or on some bike (I recently restored a Vespa 125 GTR) it just feels good. An italian superbike to ride and maintain on non-working days just seems perfect.

I am pretty certain I will end up with a 1000S, year 2005. There are several of them here, with mileage between 3,000 and 8,000 km. They do seem like new but I don't want to get ahead of myself and that is why I am here. So, if you have advice on what I should look for when inspecting a F4, I would be glad.
 

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Have the rear hub checked. Besides that... not too much to mention on those bikes.
 

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Arnould, I will join the fray here. The_Castle is trying to make a very salient point. One to which you are not listening, yet I think you should.

One of the interesting aspects of these motorcycle is the enormous amount of power produced at certain point in the rev range. Learning the controls of a motorcycle that has specific power hits that can, and will, surprise you WHILE you are learning to ride in the first place, is recipe for a disaster...monetarily, or physically, but you will lose control of this machine at some point...possibly to the detriment of life and limb...yours or someone who happens to be in your path.

As a rider of some 35+ years, I'd strongly suggest you buy the F4 of your dreams. I also recommend, much more adamantly, that you also buy a beater bike to learn on. Bike schools, here in the USA, for beginner riders put student on 125s in an upright riding position for a reason...to learn control. Heck, I'd even get a used Kawasaki 250 Ninja...you'll be surprised how much power that bike has...if you have to be in the crotch rocket riding position.

FWIW, older riders got to be older riders for a reason. It isn't because we don't like Super Bike Horse Power; it is because we know how to control said horsepower.

I can tell you I know many a person who has decided to go for the "total package" as a first bike...and then planted that bike into an object or the tarmac on the first ride out of the parking lot.

Do you plan on getting your license on the F4?


To distill this down: The F4 has a wonderful "problem" and that is viscous power when called upon. If you are not skilled and ready for that power, the F4 will hurt you.

Please be a responsible rider.

Chuck
 
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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Donsy, I have been reading A LOT of threads on this forum and I have learnt a great deal (not sure this is the way we say it, sorry for my possibly bad english).

Silent Service, I know what you mean and thank you for explaining it in such a comprehensive manner. This is what I like on this kind of forum: interested and experienced people who take the time to share their knowledge with all kind of new comers. And give good, responsible advice.

Although I never had a motorcycle (of the kind we are talking here), I may never have owned one, but I know how it is to deal with one. Certainly not with your level of control, but still...

I may not have the skills but I know what to expect, I believe that is the more important and that shall be the basis to learn without planting the bike on an object outside of the parking lot.

I cannot get my license on the F4 as it is (will be) my personal bike. Here you have to use the driving school bike (I understand that was the question). I currently have a license that allows me to drive motorcycles up to 250cc. To drive a bigger displacement bike I have to get a 250+ license, and for that the driving school uses a CBR 1000. All I have to do is to drive the bike two or three times so the teacher sees I'm comfortable with it (I know, it should be a little more than just that...), and then do the exam with an examiner. As I already have the 250cc license, it is very simple to get the 250+ one. Rest assured that I will be a very responsible rider.

And, Maximum, I will check the rear wheel hub (with 5,000 Km I except it to be fine, but you never know). I understand they wear quite quickly.

Now, I'll keep reading and learning on the forum and will abstain asking questions that have already been answered.
Again, thank you for your time.
I hope that soon I will share pictures of my new MV with you (I'm pretty sure I will!).
Wish you the best rides.
 
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