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Hey guys,

Anyone know if the low Fuel Light thermistor is a replaceable item?

I've had the low fuel light permanently on for the past year and its starting to annoy me. I dont want to replace the entire fuel pump harness unless I really have to.

MV doesnt sell the thermistor or have a part number for it either, they just list the pump electrical harness which I'm assuming has a thermistor included?

This is for my 2012 F3 675.
 

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Yes, the THERMISTOR is part of the wiring harness:

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg
 

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The unit may not be faulty. Mine quit working a couple years ago - the single wire that is connected, broke off. A quick solder job and it worked again. (make sure it is clean and dry, residual gas makes for a flaming mess.) The unit is connected to the fuel system wire harness. Not much to it really. If it is bad buy an eBay similar unit and solder it in place. While you are in there its a good time to put in a fresh fuel filter. Regards
 

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Here are a couple videos I found that helped me understand and get a visual on how NTC thermistors work with fuel...

The first short vid shows a new thermistor being soldered into a generic sensor (much like the kind in esq'z me's link above) that had been taken apart. Then shown 'bench' tested:

The second longer video has good explanation and demonstration:

Also copied failure mechanisms to help diagnose (I think my fuel light falls in the second category):

"Identifying and replacing broken thermistors will help to prevent secondary damage to other systems.

1. The most common failure is an open circuit. These failures can arise because of mechanical separation between lead materials and resistor elements. Separation occurs because of handling damage, high/excessive heat, and thermal mismatching.

2. The second most commonly experienced issue with thermistors is drifting in the resistance value. This problem begins to occur as the thermistor ages, as well as when parameters change. This problem will cause inaccurate measurements, which in turn will prevent the thermistor from providing correct thermal compensation.

3. The least common failure mode is a short circuit."

I hope this information is accurate and helpful...those with greater knowledge, let me know and I will edit or remove content if needed.
 

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Cool beans!
 
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