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Discussion Starter #1
I'm booking a local track end of this month on my Dragster RR. It's completely standard. Tyres as per standard pressures are 38f 39r running Rosso 2.

What would people say to run on track. I know these tyres are not track tyres but they'll be fine I'm sure for a bit of fun

I'll tape up front light and remove rear plate. Not sure if there's anything I'm missing?

Never used tcs or abs so leaving it on and setting 2 will have to see how it feels

Anything that could help... Especially pressures please let me know, thanks!
 

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Best to check with the tyre manufacturer as for track tyre pressure requirements mate, they are still the bests source as apposed to guys comparing your bike with their bike which might have different tyres on etc.

As for bike requirements, riding schools and track day organisers often have different requirements, best check with the group you're going with, they usualy have a web site you can browse through.

Have fun then.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Best to check with the tyre manufacturer as for track tyre pressure requirements mate, they are still the bests source as apposed to guys comparing your bike with their bike which might have different tyres on etc.

As for bike requirements, riding schools and track day organisers often have different requirements, best check with the group you're going with, they usualy have a web site you can browse through.

Have fun then.
Took your advice on this one. Speaking with Pirelli this is what I got;

Dear Dean,

Thank you for your email,

The Diablo Rosso2 tyre is designed for mostly road use and not for full track day and it can be used for an occasional track use, with regards to the track day pressures we only recommend the standard tyre pressures listed for your bike and model.

See below for tyre pressures recommended;

Front-34 Psi (2.3 Bar)

Rear-34 Psi (2.3 Bar)

Regards,

Mannie

Contact Centre

Pirelli Metzeler Moto UK

As this didnt make complete sense I replied with this;

Thank you for such a prompt reply.

I will assume you mean track pressure and I'll use what you have emailed. My bike clearly says though on the forks and manual that it should run 2.8 bar front and 2.9 bar rear

I questioned this with the shop as I thought it was high but it is correct from the bike manufacturer. The standard Brutale was 2.3 bar front and rear

Not sure if you can double check and just confirm

Thanks

And got this back;

Hello Dean,

Thank you for your reply,

I can confirm that the tyre pressures i have emailed you is what Pirelli have tested and recommend, but the pressures listed on the manufaturer handbook or advised can also be used, but as it stands i would recommend what we have listed.

Regards,

Mannie

So in summary I guess 34 front and rear for track. I'll try and see how it feels but will continue with 38/39 on road

Thanks
 

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You are in for an experience like never before. Track riding is way different from riding on the street...if someone tells you otherwise...stop listening.

Check out the track organization's requirements in regards to your bike (mirrors, lights, turn signals, license plate, coolant, safety wiring etc.). As others have mentioned, if you like getting on the track (and you will), start looking into getting specific items such as track plastics. There is no need for track specific tires and tires warmers until your pace drastically increases. Any of the current street performance tires is more than capable to carry you far into intermediate and even advanced...as to tire pressures...even 34f/34r seems a bit high for me...I'd probably start with somewhere around 31f/29r or 30f/28r...

While it depends on the organization you are riding with, you usually register and get your sticker indicating the group you are riding in. Once you are registered, you take your bike to tech inspection. Before anyone can go out, there is a rider meeting that you need to attend to learn about flags and organization-specific rules. After that you are good to go.

Once you get on the track, stay as calm and relaxed as you can be (you will get anxious, sweaty, nervous, excited all in one before your first session). Again, depending on the organization, you will start with following the leader to learn the track, learn where the corner workers are and what line the instructor is running. They might show different lines (inside, outside, race line) but that varies by organization. You may go to class after each session in the morning where you learn about basic track riding skills - again, depending on who you are riding with.

When you are out there, ride your own ride. Don't try to set the new lap record or impress anyone. Slow down your riding a bit and work on the fundamentals. Try to work on running consistent lines, smooth throttle and brake control, body positioning. Don't care about speed...it will come automatically once you got the fundamentals down. Take advantage of the instructors, they are there to help you.

Throughout the day, make sure you monitor your fluid intake...if you are not peeing multiple times, you are not drinking enough. Eat little snacks but stay away from too big of a meal. Take it easy after lunch as your concentration moved to your stomach....the session after lunch is known for a higher crash rate. Listen to your body and if you feel getting tired etc. simply pull in or sit out a session.

But above all of that....simply have fun!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You are in for an experience like never before. Track riding is way different from riding on the street...if someone tells you otherwise...stop listening.

Check out the track organization's requirements in regards to your bike (mirrors, lights, turn signals, license plate, coolant, safety wiring etc.). As others have mentioned, if you like getting on the track (and you will), start looking into getting specific items such as track plastics. There is no need for track specific tires and tires warmers until your pace drastically increases. Any of the current street performance tires is more than capable to carry you far into intermediate and even advanced...as to tire pressures...even 34f/34r seems a bit high for me...I'd probably start with somewhere around 31f/29r or 30f/28r...

While it depends on the organization you are riding with, you usually register and get your sticker indicating the group you are riding in. Once you are registered, you take your bike to tech inspection. Before anyone can go out, there is a rider meeting that you need to attend to learn about flags and organization-specific rules. After that you are good to go.

Once you get on the track, stay as calm and relaxed as you can be (you will get anxious, sweaty, nervous, excited all in one before your first session). Again, depending on the organization, you will start with following the leader to learn the track, learn where the corner workers are and what line the instructor is running. They might show different lines (inside, outside, race line) but that varies by organization. You may go to class after each session in the morning where you learn about basic track riding skills - again, depending on who you are riding with.

When you are out there, ride your own ride. Don't try to set the new lap record or impress anyone. Slow down your riding a bit and work on the fundamentals. Try to work on running consistent lines, smooth throttle and brake control, body positioning. Don't care about speed...it will come automatically once you got the fundamentals down. Take advantage of the instructors, they are there to help you.

Throughout the day, make sure you monitor your fluid intake...if you are not peeing multiple times, you are not drinking enough. Eat little snacks but stay away from too big of a meal. Take it easy after lunch as your concentration moved to your stomach....the session after lunch is known for a higher crash rate. Listen to your body and if you feel getting tired etc. simply pull in or sit out a session.

But above all of that....simply have fun!!!!!
Really appreciate that. I should have said I have done a dozen or so but 10 years back and would ride fast group

I stopped road for Mx racing and had a pretty successful run at it in a few championships until last year having a pretty bad accident.

Because of this I decided to give it up and go back into road but after such a long time off and spending every week (twice) training, racing etc I've honestly forgotten some really simple stuff

My biggest concern was the tyres, the pressures and suspension setup. I won't be going that fast given the bike is my pride and joy. I was more keen to make sure I got the little bits all correct

Completely agree with the nerves, sweat, excited bit. It become the norm in racing but you do get like this still even though it's just a track day
 
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