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Discussion Starter #1
hi, new to f4 type bike... i noticed that after i ride for an hour or so, my right index finger tip gets numb/tingling/painful... i know it's something to do with weight on wrist from riding position....first i thought it was my glove but i was fine on less aggressive bike (due ss 800)....

how do i remedy that? i heard something about core strengthening, grab the bike with knee more, less weight on handle bar/wrist...etc...

pls advise,

james R
02 f4 750 e2
 

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Everyone will have their own view, but generally yes it is more than likely excess weight on your wrists whilst riding. (Could simply be vibration through your clip ons, but doubtfull).

I believe that this is primarily down to the body's position on the bike, gripping the throtlle too tight etc etc.

Yours arms ideally need to be near to parallel with the ground and to start with you need to conciously relax on the bike. Easier said than done, I know especially when riding in built up areas where your speed would be lower than on the open road.

Gripping the tank with your kness (upper thighs if you are long legged, like Ben Spies!) helps to acheive a degree of relaxation and can be especially usuful under braking ('Stomp' grips I have found are excellent for helping with this).

In short, read some articles from the web and have someone take pictures of you riding so that you can see what your body positioning is like. It was not until I went on a track day, convinced I was buried behing the screen of my old R6, that I then saw some pictures of me looking like a wooden board apparently almost bolt upright! I found you really have to exagerate everything to acheive proper positioning.

Then compare those pictures to what you have read and those of advanced road riders/racers and you will quickly see where your position is wrong, if at all.

It is finding a happy medium, as clearly you do not need to adopt the pose of a racer when riding on some roads, but I think by learning to relax your body will go a long way to help with your problem.

I am sure others will agree disagree and have additional advice to share, but I hope that the above helps a little and maybe confirms what you already know.

Dave
 

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Dave,really good advice mate,it might help me as well with the pain in my right wrist over long distance,good on you.
 

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Vibration can cause carpal tunnel issues where the nerves pass through the wrist bones it's all rather cramped and prone to problems of swelling and consequent nerve irritation. In the mining industry they use alot of pneumatic eqt and the injury is called white finger syndrome.

I consciously keep my elbows slightly flexed ie not locked when in cruise mode..Obviously control is better anyway with elbows not locked ...This means vibes and shocks are absorbed by your manly biceps and triceps and not just your tiny wrist bones.

On my Beemer I have a little throttle friction screw fitted and I can cruise with hand off the throttle ie give it a rest ..It's a great feature...

The other thing to do is wear a tennis players wrist support...tubiflex..works wonders to support the wrist.

joe
 

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I'm over 6 foot and find the F4 a bike I can sit relatively upright on. As a result there is less weight on my wrists in a riding position, however, on longer rides the inevitable will happen - the numbness you describe will set in.
I've found that a good strategy is to preempt the onset of numbness by "listening" to what your body is relaying to you before it becomes an issue. By that I mean that the feeling of numbness will come over a period of time - not suddenly. A long time ago I found that any time I get the chance to change hand positions on the bars - normally on a relatively long stretch of straight road. I sit a bit further upright and ride for a short time just using my fingertips & thumbs. You don't have to do this for long but it's important to do it before your wrists & hands are giving you any feeling of numbness. As soon as you approach a series of corners or a potential hazard revert back to your normal riding position & grip on the bars.

Other variables that can contribute to reducing the amount of time before numbness of the hands manifests are gloves that are too tight or tenseness in the body, especially the arms.

Stay safe and take care,
Dave.
 

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I had this originally on my left hand but it was my thumb and soreness in the joint. I found that if I focused on being all of the way back on the seat and sharing more weight across my body instead of my arms most of the time resolved it. I was really just putting a lot of pressure in a hot spot.
 

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how do i remedy that? i heard something about core strengthening, grab the bike with knee more, less weight on handle bar/wrist...etc...
Bingo! I think you've said it all right thurr...

Basically, support your upper body with your core (& knees as needed) as much as possible. Ideally, you'll take ALL the weight off of your hands. And keep your shoulders/elbows/arms/wrists/hands/fingers nice and loose! Oh, and your grip, too.

Otherwise...ibuprofen?? :smoking:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
riding position

ok, tnx for all the replies...it was a bit worrisome cause the finger tip was quite annoyingly painful /numb....i type a lot so it bothered me....

anyway, it never happened with my due supersport 800 .....until the mv f4....different enough riding position.....

well, gonna do all above stuff...do some planks to get stronger abs, grab the bike with knees, conscientiously take pressure off the wrist/hand ...


thanks all the replies....

james R
 

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Great advice by all of you,when I rode to the Moto GP on my 1078,5,000km round trip the most pain I had was my right wrist,left wrist was fine,sometimes I almost had to stop the pain got so bad,the only way I could relieve the pain was to rest the palm of my hand on the throttle,but that is hard on a F4 to keep control of the throttle,so in the future on long hauls I will get my little brain to tell my body to change elbow angle and grip position.
 

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It's riding position for sure. This happens to me in a big way on my CBR but not as much on my Brutie. I've broken both wrists in the past (one on a spectacular 'agony of defeat-wide world of sports' style ski crash, and the other on roller blades...and they say bikes are dangerous).
I take every opportunity to just increase circulation to my hands. It's tough on the right, as you need to keep your throttle engaged. I sit up, stretch and shake my arms out when I'm riding down hill and the road is straighter. I predominantly ride in the canyons in the Rocky Mountains, so there's not a lot of straight (which is the best part :)) but you have to give your circulatory system some help. Otherwise you can cause nerve damage. Keep it moving long before it goes numb. It will still happen on long aggressive rides, it just won't be as severe.

The best advice anyone gave me for general riding was "baby birds", and I often remind myself while riding by repeating it in my mind.
Hold your grips as if you are holding baby birds and control your bike with your body.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
riding position

well, followed the advices above and made a huge difference....
i kept my arms parallel to end and held onto the grip real light and held the bike with my knees... had minimal right hand/finger tip numbness this time... tnx all,
james R
 

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I've found that 6-8 shots of liquer makes me so numb I don't notice the right hand anymore. Try it, much easier than those other silly suggestions.
 

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On Saturday the 28th of January I put this to the test by riding for 10 and a half hours on a 312R. Total distance travelled was 740 kilometers (460 miles). The day before was a ride of 395 kilometers (245 miles).
Turned out to be relatively easy.
 
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