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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if any guys with a 750 sport or America are running pod air filters etc for there carby setup. My mechanic recommended to do this. If so what are you using?
 

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Hi Adrian

I've thought one or twice about fitting that kind of filter to mine, but decided against it on the grounds that it's a forty-year-old bike and it's managed nicely for all these years without them (..and, of course, I enjoy the intake noise!) The engine on my bike burns no more oil than it was designed to do, and it goes like clockwork. Moreover, I've seen any number of Guzzis wearing open bell-mouth carbs, with over 200,000 miles on their engines, and they're still going strong. I guess it depends upon how 'dirty' the air might be in your neighborhood!

And while we're talking of filters: When you're changing your engine oil, be sure to use a filter with the correct 'rubberized' ends. The metal-ended type can be used, but not before you've ground away some of the metal from it to allow it to seat properly over the lugs in the engine casting (see pic.) If these filters are used as they come, they won't be filtering the oil at all!

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Adrian

I've thought one or twice about fitting that kind of filter to mine, but decided against it on the grounds that it's a forty-year-old bike and it's managed nicely for all these years without them (..and, of course, I enjoy the intake noise!) The engine on my bike burns no more oil than it was designed to do, and it goes like clockwork. Moreover, I've seen any number of Guzzis wearing open bell-mouth carbs, with over 200,000 miles on their engines, and they're still going strong. I guess it depends upon how 'dirty' the air might be in your neighborhood!

And while we're talking of filters: When you're changing your engine oil, be sure to use a filter with the correct 'rubberized' ends. The metal-ended type can be used, but not before you've ground away some of the metal from it to allow it to seat properly over the lugs in the engine casting (see pic.) If these filters are used as they come, they won't be filtering the oil at all!

Steve
That's what I said to him Steve, plus I think it won't look any good.
But he said bike will perform better with filters, not sold on it yet though
I asked Bill Irwin about the oil filters ,he recommended and uses Ryco 2008P on his bike. Never had a issue with them he said, so I went with this filter.
 

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I've not used the Ryco filters Adrian, but having just 'Googled' to get a look at them, I found this: http://www.onlineautomotive.com.au/R2008P-Ryco-Cartridge-Filter

I've no wish to disagree with Bill (..he's a bit of an MV guru, after all!) but unless these are of a smaller diameter than the Fram filters the club supplies, the metal ends on them won't allow the filter to seat properly in the engine casting. The casting has three 'lugs' positioned equidistant around the perimeter of the filter housing, over which the rubber ended filters are able to stretch (..this forcing oil to pass through the filter's centre, as it should). The metal ones aren't able to do this, and instead allow oil to flow around their outsides where it isn't being filtered.

I've no doubt an engine will run for some years without a filter (..with no noticeable problems) so long as the oil is changed regularly, but it's not something I'd want to risk. :jsm:

Steve
 

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The pods will change the air velocity at the mouth of the carb. You may have jetting to do if you install them. I presume you are removing the velocity stacks when you install the pods?

On bikes with a large volume air cleaner box, removing the box and installing pods may have looked good, but actually reduced horsepower.

Still....I kind of like clean air going into my intakes. Maybe just make a filter to cover the end of the stack?
 

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The pods will change the air velocity at the mouth of the carb. You may have jetting to do if you install them. I presume you are removing the velocity stacks when you install the pods?

On bikes with a large volume air cleaner box, removing the box and installing pods may have looked good, but actually reduced horsepower.

Still....I kind of like clean air going into my intakes. Maybe just make a filter to cover the end of the stack?
I run mine open on ALL my classic bikes, for me, the sounds, be it intake or exhaust are everything, If I had to drop a couple of HP for the perfect sound I'd make that trade off everytime. Of course, some people are the complete opposite and I guess it really is all about what brings you (personally) the most enjoyment when you ride.

I've always thought about making a filter to cover the end but never came up with a suitable solution that would look good or one not likely to cause more problems that it could potentially correct. :eek:

If anyone has any ideas or successfully done it, please feel free to share :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've not used the Ryco filters Adrian, but having just 'Googled' to get a look at them, I found this: http://www.onlineautomotive.com.au/R2008P-Ryco-Cartridge-Filter

I've no wish to disagree with Bill (..he's a bit of an MV guru, after all!) but unless these are of a smaller diameter than the Fram filters the club supplies, the metal ends on them won't allow the filter to seat properly in the engine casting. The casting has three 'lugs' positioned equidistant around the perimeter of the filter housing, over which the rubber ended filters are able to stretch (..this forcing oil to pass through the filter's centre, as it should). The metal ones aren't able to do this, and instead allow oil to flow around their outsides where it isn't being filtered.

I've no doubt an engine will run for some years without a filter (..with no noticeable problems) so long as the oil is changed regularly, but it's not something I'd want to risk. :jsm:

Steve
Not sure about that Steve. Bill swears by them though. I will get some from the uk spares as I just joined up.
You don't have a picture of your tank clamp? Mine is missing and not sure what it looks like.
 

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You don't have a picture of your tank clamp? Mine is missing and not sure what it looks like.
There's no clamp, Adrian. Besides the two bolts at the front of the tank, there's only a round-sectioned rubber strap with an 'eye' on each end. This sits in the u-shaped flange on the rear of the tank, and its 'eyes' loop over the two forward side-panel lugs before the side-panels are fitted (see pic).

The strap can plainly be seen when fitted, and it looks naff. Mine doesn't have one; instead, I've used a large rubber 'O' ring, and attached its lower part to the frame using the two (x2) red cable ties you can see in the photo.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #9
There's no clamp, Adrian. Besides the two bolts at the front of the tank, there's only a round-sectioned rubber strap with an 'eye' on each end. This sits in the u-shaped flange on the rear of the tank, and its 'eyes' loop over the two forward side-panel lugs before the side-panels are fitted (see pic).

The strap can plainly be seen when fitted, and it looks naff. Mine doesn't have one; instead, I've used a large rubber 'O' ring, and attached its lower part to the frame using the two (x2) red cable ties you can see in the photo.

Steve
Thanks Steve.
Ok, that's what's holding mine also cable ties . I can see that you would see the rubber if it uses the side panels to hold it down.
It's a bit hard to tell from your photo how you fixed yours, I can see the cable tie only
 

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It's a bit hard to tell from your photo how you fixed yours, I can see the cable tie only

That's actually an older photo, Adrian, and I recall now one day returning from a ride to find the tank looking a bit low at the rear end. When I checked beneath it, I found that its rubber support had slipped a little down the frame. The 'O' ring I'd used as a strap hadn't held the tank firmly enough against it. I fitted a smaller diameter 'O' ring, and all has been well since.

Here's a pic. of how it is now:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That's actually an older photo, Adrian, and I recall now one day returning from a ride to find the tank looking a bit low at the rear end. When I checked beneath it, I found that its rubber support had slipped a little down the frame. The 'O' ring I'd used as a strap hadn't held the tank firmly enough against it. I fitted a smaller diameter 'O' ring, and all has been well since.

Here's a pic. of how it is now:
Thanks Steve. Do you remember what size o ring you used that was suitable.Will do the same
 

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Thanks Steve. Do you remember what size o ring you used that was suitable.Will do the same
It was around 5/6mm thick and 60mm inside dia. I think; but anywhere near that should do. It may even have been one of the spares I had that are generally used to hold on the fairing sides. Can't quite remember! I'll investigate when I've a few minutes free in the garage.

The pic shows the type of strap that should be on there. Looks like they're still available from 'guzzino'.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It was around 5/6mm thick and 60mm inside dia. I think; but anywhere near that should do. It may even have been one of the spares I had that are generally used to hold on the fairing sides. Can't quite remember! I'll investigate when I've a few minutes free in the garage.

The pic shows the type of strap that should be on there. Looks like they're still available from 'guzzino'.
Thanks, very helpful
 
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