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Cyber SPOTTER
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Classic MV Agustas NEVER breakdown - in worst case scenario they will "fail to proceed" - I have experienced quite a few failures in progression. As you read on you will find I/we have become very comfortable with these situations.

Yesterday, after having repaired the puncture (caused by me) on my wife's Moto Guzzi - we went for a ride. I chose the 350s as my bike du jour.

Riding along the highway at around 130kph I felt a huge wobble on the left side of the fairing - I looked down & unbelievably the left bracket has clean snapped. Rather than stop I chose to slow down to around 100kph and hold the fairing bracket together with my left hand. I knew a nice restaurant/cafe some 6-7 kilometres away. I figured that was a good place to take stock & deal with my minor inconvenience. Riding one handed & clutchless shifts proved no obstacle, however my lovely wife did note from hehind that something may have been amiss for two reasons:
1. I had slowed down: and
2. My riding position was akin to that of the hunchback of Notre-Dame.


We pulled up into Panorama House car park:


Note the snapped bracket! Who would have thought!


Considering our options over a spot of lunch: Tomato & basil bruschetta with glazed balsamic vinegar & spicy calamari over a green salad with combination sweet chilli & lemon dip.


Whilst we took in this view:


We then decided to go home & get some tools - Lou stayed in cafe sipping coffee & mineral waters whilst I rode home on the Guzzi & returned with our little Citroen van. Getting to work on the MV ( I am not praying to it -lol):


Put the fairing safely in the van:


Rode my new naked bike home - dropping in on some friends on the way home - Lou of course drove the van home. Note the sticking out headlight a la speed triple - lol.


This thread is basically an insight into owning & riding a classic - if this kind of thing fazes you then it's probably not for you. It also helps to have some mechanical aptitude as you will get tested out in the open from time to time.

For us it was just a little fun adventure that we had a laugh about over dinner last night. :laughing:

I am now heading into the garage to what's around metal wise (raining outside) to manufacture a new bracket :)

Got to love the old bikes :yo:
 

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Great story Rob, looks like the knee's okay judging by the "praying" photo?

Beautiful bike too!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice Rob, just another day out hey :mouthwate
Hey Donsy, not just another day more like a "typical day out on a classic" -lol

Great story Rob, looks like the knee's okay judging by the "praying" photo?

Beautiful bike too!
Knee is GREAT thanks mate - hope you are coming along great as well :)

Thanks, it is a gorgeous little bike, I've pushed it for 5.7 klms at the height of last summer (from memory) done ghetto repairs to get home & you know, I would not trade it for the world - it's been with me for 16-17 years or so - my memory doesn't go back that far these days ;)

looks like you have been to ALDI...LOL...
Yep - $24 mid-layer tops - got the wool jumpers for $39 as well & the balaclava $10 & $10 socks. Great spot -:laughing:
 

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Reminds me of all those things we used to do as kids with our motorbikes. Tap head gaskets out of brown paper, filing down and adjusting points gaps. Checking tappets, and of course cleaning and gapping spark plugs, virtually an everyday task if your bike was a 2 stroke:blah:

I remember breaking down yards from home one dark evening on my CB350 Honda and pushing it under a street lamp to investigate why it had stopped. After 20 minutes of pissing about looking at this, that and the other, my dad, who had seen what had happened from the lounge window, walked up the road to help and pointed out I'd accidentally flicked the kill switch to the off position. Previous British bikes I'd owned didn't have the luxury of a kill switch. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Reminds me of all those things we used to do as kids with our motorbikes. Tap head gaskets out of brown paper, filing down and adjusting points gaps. Checking tappets, and of course cleaning and gapping spark plugs, virtually an everyday task if your bike was a 2 stroke:blah:

I remember breaking down yards from home one dark evening on my CB350 Honda and pushing it under a street lamp to investigate why it had stopped. After 20 minutes of pissing about looking at this, that and the other, my dad, who had seen what had happened from the lounge window, walked up the road to help and pointed out I'd accidentally flicked the kill switch to the off position. Previous British bikes I'd owned didn't have the luxury of a kill switch. Lol
LOL Dads!!! I get to do that now the shoe is on the other foot, the other day my young bloke couldn't start the Cagiva, asked for my help , I flicked the kill switch over & said "Try that" - I really do love THAT shade of red :laughing:

Mate reliving that stuff is what keeps you young, the youngsters on here will be asking what 'points' are? :jsm: - No Kill switch? Hell even my 63 GS Vespa has a kill switch, oh hang on, it doesn't have an ignition key without a kill switch you couldn't turn it off unless you closed the feul tap & waited a little while :laughing:
 

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No doubt most of us with a few years on the clock have lots of similar stories from past times. I know I have. I.e. changing head gaskets almost everweek on my ex W.D. BSA M21 and sidecar. I was 20, and it was the only way to get 4 of us to the fleshpots of London.
Don´t get me started on points. My old Yamaha 250 lost the ignition set up,(depth guage and ohm meter,) every few days. So much that a 100 mile journey to see a girlfriend, started at an easy cruise at 70 mph, and before arriving at Folkestone, would not pass 50 mph
Still, great post. Thanks Rob.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
MVista Fabrications

We found some metal - a welder, a hammer & bench grinder (not to waste a rainy Sunday afternoon), Result:



I had MVista Jnr - drill 5mm holes & tap a M6x1 thread into some scrap metal, he has the knack now & will drill & tap the end of the bracket once he has finished painting it. He has applied primer, first coat of paint tomorrow morning - Tuesday second coat - Wednesday drill & tap & put bike together again.

I think I'll ride the F4 next weekend, it's like taking the weekend of work -LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No doubt most of us with a few years on the clock have lots of similar stories from past times. I know I have. I.e. changing head gaskets almost everweek on my ex W.D. BSA M21 and sidecar. I was 20, and it was the only way to get 4 of us to the fleshpots of London.
Don´t get me started on points. My old Yamaha 250 lost the ignition set up,(depth guage and ohm meter,) every few days. So much that a 100 mile journey to see a girlfriend, started at an easy cruise at 70 mph, and before arriving at Folkestone, would not pass 50 mph
Still, great post. Thanks Rob.
LOL - I knew the post would bring some of the 'old timers' (with the greatest respect) out - I love it !!!! Puntine - a dirty word ;) I think there are those that do think that riding a classic is just wind on the face on a shiny old bike - this post is basically a more 'realistic' portrait of riding a classic ;)

This is a good way for me to pass down some of the skills to my young fellow that Dad (God rest his soul) passed down to me. Not a bad bit of fabrication for a financial controller me thinks ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Good welding mate !!!
Cheers John, that means the world to me. My dad was amongst the most gifted welders on the planet as I found out at his retirement function (I was invited as his designated driver ;)), he tried to teach me (as he thought me everything else, except how to ride, he was scared of bikes) anyhow to say I was a disappointment in the welding field would be a compliment to my feeble efforts. To have produced something deemed as acceptable is very pleasing indeed. :)

Great tale Rob. Been there, done that. The joys of the classics but they are well worth it ... most of the time.
I am sure you have Russ & then some - :laughing: With you mate, I am preaching to the converted, in fact, probably preaching to the Master ;) It's always worth it - like I said to guy on the Honda who told me to buy a 'proper bike' when I was pushing it last summer - "Hey, I rather PUSH my MV than ride your Honda!" I stand by that. :yo:
 

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And there, Rob, is the secret to a happy life. Take a little failure like this and make it into an adventure / learning experience, not a chore / bitching session.
Thanks for sharing.
 

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You´re doing alright.
Much of my philosophy about life in general, and bikes in particular, come from my father. He passed on many years ago, aged 52, and I still miss him.
 

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And there, Rob, is the secret to a happy life. Take a little failure like this and make it into an adventure / learning experience, not a chore / bitching session.
Thanks for sharing.
Absolutely Dave, I have seen guys by the side of the road with classics swearing, throwing stuff around and looking depressed at yet another failure in progression. I always think to myself, you should sell it as it's obviously not doing what it should be doing & that's bringing you enjoyment.

Actually, you are very lucky to have Melanie, whom I have been fortunate enough to see first hand deal with little problems with fantastic measure of assurity & poise! :)

Hopefull next year, we will undertake some of these adventures together on both old classic MVs and state of art modern MVs :)

You´re doing alright.
Much of my philosophy about life in general, and bikes in particular, come from my father. He passed on many years ago, aged 52, and I still miss him.
I know what you mean - Dad passed away in 2003 & I seem to miss him more as time goes on rather than less. I think on continued reflection you realise even more what great people they were. Although in a way I am glad I don't have to present this piece of work for his approval :eek: If he was here he would have knocked it up in stainless steel & the welds would have been the highlight like those Moto Corse Ti mufflers :mouthwate
 
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