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Does anybody have any tips on this, other than RTFM?

Looks easy, am I missing something obvious? Any words of wisdom from those who have gone before me would be appreciated....
 

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I've done it.
RTFM is right. The manual is the bible.

The valve inspection was straight forward. Get a good set of feeler gauges. That'll help.

My pointers:
1. The valve cover was a bitch to get out of the frame. On my bike, the coolant overflow reservoir has a hose out the bottom, and the cover needs to clear that hose. Unfortunately, the cover has a raised section on it, for the cam gears and chain, and that raised section made it hard to get that thing out. I did get it, but not with out a few four letter words as lubrication.

2. Have someone help you with the gas tank. I tried that solo and broke the connector. If there had been someone else to hold the tank a few inches off the bike so I could get my hands in there to undo the connectors, I probably would not have. However, I now have the nice chrome plated brass ones in there so I don't have to worry about that again.

3. Make note of the hose routing for the gas tank overflow line.

4. BE VERY CAREFUL with the connectors on the hose side of the fuel line (where it meets the tank). MV went to a new fuel line construction with the 1k bikes. The fuel line is a two part construction - an outter sleve made of a rubber material (trade name is Sunprene) with a VERY stiff inner tube make of a fluoropolymer. This inner material is so stiff that MV does not use any clamps on the fuel line! I had a bitch of a time putting the metal fittings on there. As a matter of fact, for the fuel feed line, I was not able to do it, and now have standard automotive FI fuel line. JamesC found out that MV went to this new fuel line construction to minimize the pressure loss due to expansion of the line! If that isn't over engineering, I don't know what is. And I'm an engineer!

5. It would be nice if you had the Iridium NGK plugs right now. I sure wish I had. My bike only had 1.5k miles on it when I did my valve check, and I didn't and still don't have any problems with stalling, but I like the Iridium plugs and now I'll have to take it all apart again to put them in there.

That's about all I can think of for now. Some other things may occur to me later, which I'll try to post.

BTW, don't let this scare you off. I've done all the work on my previous bikes (all japanese) - motors, suspension, chasis - and this bike is by far the most fun to work on. Also, it's probably the easiest. The guys who put this thing together have spent some time working on bikes and knew what to do.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Alex!

I had someone help me with the fuel tank, forgot to check the routing on the hoses, and managed to NOT break the fittings....yet. I'm going to look for the plugs as long as I have the bike apart. It's going to the track in about a week if I can get the valves checked and adjusted before then. It is an interesting bike to work on, but I think the guy that wrote the manual must have been paid by the word. This manual reads like stereo instructions! But it is good for a laugh....
 

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"The guys who put this thing together have spent some time working on bikes and knew what to do."

Yea...like all the ex-cagive gp team and most of the guys that worked for MV Agusta when it closed down. They worked on this bike for 7 years before it was released.
 

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agustafan001 said:
"The guys who put this thing together have spent some time working on bikes and knew what to do."

Yea...like all the ex-cagive gp team and most of the guys that worked for MV Agusta when it closed down. They worked on this bike for 7 years before it was released.
I agree its well put together, but there's an awfull lot of bits there that have to fit perfect, you can understand why MV make no money, I can change the air filter on a Ducati in about 10minutes, the MV is about 4 hours!

A couple of pointers.
1 check the air filter while your in there, even with 1000 miles it will be filthy.

2 take the injection stacks off to remove the cam cover backwards.

3 Leave all the rads in place untill you have checked the clearances, they only need removing to change tappet shims.

4 You can fiddle the cams out without undoing the chain wheels.

5 The cam box has a chain runner on the inside, I have a feeling this also tensions the chain a small amount, I always leave the chain adjuster middle screw (that applies tension to the chain via a spring and ratchet) a couple of mm unscrewed/loose untill I have replaced the cam cover, I figure this MAY prevent the chain being over tensioned, certainly can't do any harm.

6 Use new rubber well nuts under the rear eyebrow fastener, they will be knackered with the fuel vapour.

7 A full injection set up will be needed after adjustments.

8 Mv and NGK also go to a lot of trouble to tell you what torque to tighten spark plugs to, there have been a few reports of plug threads being knackered requiring new cylinder heads, people say its over tightening of the plugs, I have a suspicion it may be under tightening which allows the plug to come loose and "rattle" around destroying the threads, You would'nt hand tighten a big end conrod bolt and give it "a nip up" so why do most people tighten spark plugs this way?

I hope this is helpfull to you. :)
 

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Random notes:

1. Buy the green o-rings that go on the fuel line fittings. It's not a bad idea to change them, but new ones will be slightly more difficult to put in. I put a TINY amount of grease on them (so as to not contaminate fuel) to make it easier. It's really easy to cut one during install. Buy a few just in case. You'll probably need them at some point.

2. I've yet to get my throttle bodies out of place. They are stuck in there so hard that I'm afraid to get them out now. I'm sure I can do it, but I chose to...

3. Instead, it may be easier to remove the coolant fitting on the front of the head where the thermostat is, and slide the valve cover out the front. I did. The radiators have to come off, but it doesn't hurt to do the coolant at the same time, does it?

4. There's some disagreement about how to reinstall the valve cover gasket. Some people say to use a new one, some people not. Some people say to use a thin coat of grease on it, some sealant. I used a new seal, and sealant on the bottom side, and I just wetted the top with a little oil. Torqued it down, and it has not leaked. Yours may leak, it may not.

5. I checked my valves twice, and they were exactly the same both times. I think the first time was around 2500 miles and the second around 6000. I've got about 8500 on it now. I probably should check them again at some point...

6. Apparently Honda CBR900RR shims will fit, and they come in smaller increments than MV, and are cheaper. I don't know, I haven't had to adjust mine yet. But if you want to get the clearances perfect, this might be a good way.

Probably some other stuff I'm forgetting. The stuff the other guys said is right, but there is more than one way to do things (in particular the part about removing the throttle bodies) so whatever works.
 
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