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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,
After a couple of days of very hard riding particularly in lower gears today my gearbox is whining, only noticeably in 1st and 2nd. Is this normal and just the sign of bike that has travelled ~30,000km aging gracefully, or is it likely to be a precursor to spending a lot of money in the near future?

Thanks
Jeremy
 

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Hi,
After a couple of days of very hard riding particularly in lower gears today my gearbox is whining, only noticeably in 1st and 2nd. Is this normal and just the sign of bike that has traveled ~30,000km aging gracefully, or is it likely to be a precursor to spending a lot of money in the near future?

Thanks
Jeremy
look in the engine manual....
on the main shaft 1st is part of the shaft, 2nd rides on a bearing

on the counter shaft they both ride on bearings, because they are on opposite ends of the shafts I'd vote counter shaft bearings

drain your oil......see a bunch of stuff on the magnet?

buy a complete transmission for ~$275....

the main shaft is $1,000+ gears are ~$250-$500 each, then you need bearings and shims :jsm::jsm::jsm:

just check the case bearings when you pull the transmission
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply Noel. Not quite the answer I was after though. :mad:

Planning on doing an oil change on the weekend..
 

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Perhaps this was the answer you were seeking?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-diB65scQU

Actually, I would change the oil looking for tell-tales as Noel has suggested.

Fill 'er back up with a quality synthetic and see what's-what.
 

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Perhaps this was the answer you were seeking?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-diB65scQU

Actually, I would change the oil looking for tell-tales as Noel has suggested.

Fill 'er back up with a quality synthetic and see what's-what.
lmfao, good one Chuck. :)

In all honesty, the bearings on these gearboxes are sooo friggin easy to replace, and not that expensive.
As Noel mentioned though, you can buy them second hand at good cost, just be sure to get the right parts for your model.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Chuck, for some reason I feel much better now.. :)

I will change the oil and assess from there.

I have had the bike since new and it has always had a top quality full synthetic.. I know it isn't a Honda, however I would expect to get more than 30,000km out of a gerbox..
 

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Those gearboxes are pretty tough.

Don't worry, be happy!:smoking:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Drained the oil today and apart from the usual "fir" on the magnet all looks OK so fingers crossed no significant damage...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Did you see the links I posted for you on your other thread about the return spring.
Yes thanks Dons. The spring is definately broken and I have a new one arriving tomorrow.

I managed to get the sproket nut off, however the one on the clutch side is proving quite a problem. Any suggestions?

Also, can you recomend an appropriate tool to split and relink the chain?

Thanks
J
 

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Yes thanks Dons. The spring is definately broken and I have a new one arriving tomorrow.

I managed to get the sproket nut off, however the one on the clutch side is proving quite a problem. Any suggestions?

Also, can you recomend an appropriate tool to split and relink the chain?

Thanks
J
Mate I just hold the clutch basket with a welding glove and use a 1/2" drive rattle gun to get it of. I have seen some of them with Loctite on, and I imagine a bit of heat to loosen the Loctite might help.
After going through a few chain splitting operations per month, I have concluded that the DID chain tool is the best, I still grind the pins down a bit before splitting them, and that save's the tool too. It works great riveting them back together too.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Mate I just hold the clutch basket with a welding glove and use a 1/2" drive rattle gun to get it of. I have seen some of them with Loctite on, and I imagine a bit of heat to loosen the Loctite might help.
After going through a few chain splitting operations per month, I have concluded that the DID chain tool is the best, I still grind the pins down a bit before splitting them, and that save's the tool too. It works great riveting them back together too.
I may be able to get the clutch tool for a reasonable price..

The KM501E?
http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/34121/i/did-km501e-sport-cutting-and-riveting-tool
 

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Mate I just hold the clutch basket with a welding glove and use a 1/2" drive rattle gun to get it of. I have seen some of them with Loctite on, and I imagine a bit of heat to loosen the Loctite might help.
vivere;
Donsy left out the part about putting the entire clutch pack back in, without the pressure plate, holding just the basket doesn't do anything, the nut is on the hub, flatten the lock washer .
now with a leather glove on your left hand, use the side of your thumb to put pressure on the plates

DO NOT HAVE THE BIKE IN GEAR
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Noel. That was the piece of information I was missing..

Luckily I managed to get my hands on this for a very reasonable price... :)
 

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hub tool?

vivere;
the advantage of doing it my way is, you CAN NOT hurt the hub....amongst other advantages:)

make sure the fingers that go into the slots in the hub are smooth and FIT the slots...any nicks, dents, notches or grooves can effect the clutch release

I'm old school, I don't risk parts with "clever tools"......

10 to 1, I can get the hub off faster my way with no risk to the hub

we both start with the clutch cover off, the pressure plate off and the lock washer flattened...
we have the same 1/2" impact wrench

you must remove the plates and discs
adjust the tool to fit the hub
then remove the nut
then you must put the plates and discs back into the hub basket assembly, the friction plates have index marks, don't mess them up

I put the glove on and remove the nut, then remove the entire clutch assembly as a unit with the thrust washer, put the pressure plate back on and start the screws and run a piece of safety wire through the assembly to keep it together

who spent more time, money, effort and risked mismatching parts....not me :drummer:

my buddy Joakim CNC'd a drop in tool for Aprilias.....its beautiful, but, he still has to remove some of the clutch pack

but, he has the whole Swedish winter to do things, instead of riding :stickpoke

I do not own any clutch hub tools or have I ever used one OR seen one used in 50+ years of working on bikes

:popcorn:
 
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