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Discussion Starter #1
F4 instrument cover.

Is it made from acrylic plastic ? I'm trying to id the material as I want to polish out a blemish and I want to do it good if not gooder.

joe
 

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Don't know what kind of plastic it is, but i've used Plast-X to clean up all kinds of plastic like headlights, windscreens, dashes, fairings, etc. For deep scratches or places where hydraulic fluid has really etched the part i've used some 1000 then 1500 then 2000 grit sand paper to wet sand the blems out then clean up the haze left over with the Plast-X. Might be something out there called scratch-X which is basically the same thing. Really any polishing compound should do the job. Not buffing/cutting compound, but "polishing" compound.



Caveat: its tempting to want to use a buffer or some kind of tool that would speed up the process. However, using such can cause burns and actually cut into the surface it one isn't very careful....and even if they are very careful. Unless one is a professional body man/woman and doesn't mind replacing the parts if they screw up i'd suggest just taking the slow and steady route and do it by hand. Have seen many folks do more damage with a tool and claim "i barely touched it" than anybody has been able to do by going at it by hand.
 

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9,955 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Don't know what kind of plastic it is, but i've used Plast-X to clean up all kinds of plastic like headlights, windscreens, dashes, fairings, etc. For deep scratches or places where hydraulic fluid has really etched the part i've used some 1000 then 1500 then 2000 grit sand paper to wet sand the blems out then clean up the haze left over with the Plast-X. Might be something out there called scratch-X which is basically the same thing. Really any polishing compound should do the job. Not buffing/cutting compound, but "polishing" compound.



Caveat: its tempting to want to use a buffer or some kind of tool that would speed up the process. However, using such can cause burns and actually cut into the surface it one isn't very careful....and even if they are very careful. Unless one is a professional body man/woman and doesn't mind replacing the parts if they screw up i'd suggest just taking the slow and steady route and do it by hand. Have seen many folks do more damage with a tool and claim "i barely touched it" than anybody has been able to do by going at it by hand.
Hey, thanks for that..great advice . Much appreciated.

joe
 
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