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Alright....downloaded it but its a bit late...will see that I'll work on it over the weekend...
Took a bit longer but I got slammed with work. Translated it at a late hour, with beer involved and without taking the highest level of the English language into account....but I hope it is a bit better than what Google would do...enjoy.

Motorrad Magazin said:
Unfortunately cool

I wake up drenched in sweat. Today the MV Agusta F3 Oro arrives for testing. The production is limited to 200 bike and is completely sold out. The bike I am expected to perform on will be delivered to its owner afterwards - that sounds great

Technically, I don't need to ride that crazy with the Oro since I know how the triple cylinder works based on the presentation of the regular F3. MV Agusta already showed its abilities on the Paul Ricard racetrack located in the south of France. In principle, the only point is to ride around town and to test the Oehlins suspension on bad roads.

The first impression of the bike is almost a bit silly: Oro, which is Italian and means Gold, is everywhere. The golden mesh at the fairing especially looks like sprayed on. Rims: Gold. Frame: Gold. Swingarm: Gold. Even the chain: Gold. The only gold I would actually miss is the one of the fully adjustable Oehlins fork, the Oehlins steering damper, and the Oehlins TTX suspension. Even more classy is the second material used, carbon fiber. Even though the triple tail pipes are not made of carbon fiber as previously planned, carbon fiber can be found nearly everywhere: Fairing, air induct, chain guard, and bug spoiler. On top of that, some of the visible engine parts are polished, the clutch cover is actually completely milled.

From a technical standpoint, the Oro differs from the regular F3 by the milled Brembo mono bloc brakes, frame parts as well as the frame itself. Including the aluminum wheels, the Oro only weighs about 414 pounds including all fluids.

Finally, the Oro is mine…the car park starts to tremble once I start the triple. Even at a leisurely pace, I need to play with gas and clutch in order to keep the engine alive. Once the engine hits 6000 rpm the engine starts to pull, everything below is just Kindergarten. With full intentions, I ride around city traffic…while it works it isn't really much fun. Country roads are better….except the stupid speed limit. I feel like a third-grader with attention deficit syndrome riding along in sixth gear at 62 mph; you cannot sit still. One's weaker self actually forces one to switch through the gears to let the tail pipes roar; second or third gear with the rpm's always in the five-digit band of the tachometer. The twitchy ride reveals some problems with the set-up: The electronic throttle does not yet work correctly; too many parameters interfere with the throttle and butterfly valves. Throttle response is actually delayed if opened fast, with the clutch pulled in one can actually manage to kill the engine.

The gear changes work almost perfectly using the standard quick shifter. Hard on the gas, gear shifts are seamlessly and the triple accelerates without interruption. After a few kilometers, the brand-new Pirelli tires have reached temperature and the first fast corners are absorbed. Three meter wide streets are enough to have proper fun with the agile Italian. The small 675 is pushed easily through the German Albs. The brakes can be modulated perfectly and the chassis accepts speed or steering corrections without any drama even at full lean angle.

The MV gets you hooked: The sound and handling are intoxicating. Revving the twin up to 15,000 rpm into the delimiter which abruptly cuts the acceleration sets you on a speed trip for life…accompanied by a moronic grin on your face. Who needs 200 horsepower if 132.5 already provide such great joys. Whether Oro or regular, the small MV Agusta offers insane fun. The rough edges won't upset fans of Itailan motorcycles; they are used to grief. Whoever expect Japanese mass production boredom will be disappointed however; one cannot simply just ride an MV Agusta. Even though Mr. Castiglioni now offers his commodities with an attractive price tag, buying alone is not enough. The MV must be loved….in good times and bad. If she does not want one way, leave her alone. Regular, potentially pricey, visits at the authorized MV plastic surgeon should be accepted with a simple shrug of the shoulders. The experienced MV Agusta rider generally parks more than one motorcycle in his/her garage masking the empty spot if one needs a checkup at the repair shop.

Conclusion: If all the above characteristics apply, you are mature enough for a long and happy relationship with the most erotic temptation on two wheels. The Oro is sold out which keeps your retirement fund safe. About 40 of the 200 are destined for Germany, hopefully all in good hands. If not, I would open up a nursing home for disowned F3's….
 

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Glenn, the bike in the picture above is already sold, but they told me they had another out the back still in its crate looking for a new owner!
Alas, I can't see that being me.
 
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