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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
got my 2012 f3675 6 weeks ago and was blown away with looks and sound of the bike since then im not so sure ,the amount of things that are not up to standard are making me think maybe dare i say it a jap bike would of been better first thing when i rode bike unless your on a snooker table the ride is very stiff too stiff for a road bike then theres idle noise of clutch ,gearbox not so smooth clunky ,mapping way out(had latest put on today)petrol tanks got ripples down one side and pillion seat has got marks coming through are all these problems the price you pay for been a bit different
 

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Have you had the bike set up for your weight/style? I had mine sorted out and it was a different bike. Many people claim a bike is too stiff, does not handle etc. but never have it set up. The F3 is fully adjustable (although without high/low speed compression adjustment) it's pretty easy to have the bike out of kilter for you. Mine was sooo stiff it was unbelievable and not enough static or ride sag.

The rest of it, sorry can't help there. I will definitley say that the gearbox is not as good as my old Ninja and the mapping not as smooth as the Daytona, but the latest map is really good. The light throttle contributes towards some of the nervousness (which can feel like mapping). But neither looks, sounds or rides like my F3. But that's what I like. I'm happy to have a crowded dash, the box that needs a little more firmness and the rattly clutch (I also have a Ducati), because I just "get it" when riding it. It was the rawness and urgency that I liked over the Japanese bikes. The looks and sound were just secondary.

The tank and pillion seat is disappointing though. Perhaps contact your local dealer?

My advice, if you don't like it, sell it and buy something you do like. I can recommend the Daytona. If I ever need to sell and downgrade/downsize, I will aim for a 675R (pre 2013).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i only weigh 11.5 stone ive got preload backed off still very stiff especially rear,its funny because i get sick off it but then i go in garage and look at it and think its just to nice to part with
 

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bazzb,

If you are lighter than average you might need to change the fork/shock springs for your weight to make the ride bearable.
Much like Ducati, the MVs are an aquired taste - not everyone will like them and they are nothing like the Japanese 600s they compete against. For me, that's good, as I knew that going in, but that may not work for you. For MV to really set the market on fire, sales-wise, however, the brand must have attributes more like their competition. Have you noticed how Ducati recently drooped their trademark dry clutches for oil-bath versions and increased their valve adjustment intervals to match the competition? All in the interest of increased sales.
 

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I weigh in at 11 stone and had the bike set up correctly. I'd recommend this over just a bit of hit and miss tuning, unless you know what you're doing. Have you altered the compression damping and the rebound (front and rear)? The preload is not the only thing that affects the ride stiffness.

If not then the bike will still be hard. Mine was set to 0.5 turns from full hard on the rear, out of the box. I run it at 3 or there abouts, so maybe 2.5 turns out for you? can't remember the front off hand.

My ZX6-R was set up far stiffer, so the MV is really comfortable in comparison. Depends on what you want? You'll never get touring comfort out of the bike, not sure what you're comparison is, but my GSX-R 600 was a tad more forgiving, but not really that much. They can all be dialed to somewhere similar.
 

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Most of the F3's are stiff from the factory. We have two riders that are 150 in full gear and once we adjusted sag and other suspension settings the ride was where it should be. These bikes are set almost perfectly for the track where you want a stiffer suspension. You bought a track weapon designed and engineered for hard riding. If you aren't riding within I would say 70% of the bikes potential it won't feel as confident and stable as it should. We've put three of the F3's through their paces moreso on the track but still on the street and they perform phenomenally.

I would suggest as mentioned before that if the bikes setup and feel isn't to your liking you might be more suited to a different bike. These models yearn for someone to ride them hard and precise and if you aren't comfortable or want to do that then it will feel unstable and quirky. These aren't around town commuter bikes and shouldn't be treated as so :p
 

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Yep, they will tolerate being ridden calmly but they don't like it. Before you make a decision take it somewhere you can flog it (with lots of corners) and act like a hoon for a bit. I'm willing to bet the bike will make more sense to you after that.
 

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The worst ride for me was through London traffic to the Ace Cafe, with a pillion. The bike was snatchy and bad tempered, add in the sensitive, light throttle, an achey clutch hand and it's best effort to cook my nether regions and ensure sterility, I was not a happy man!

Last big ride out, the bike was in Sports Mode, the roads were clear and it was throttle to the stops for every overtake. Up on one wheel, head shaking and engine heading for the red line, out of a turn, everything just comes together.

As above, you need to push the bike to get the most out of it. Commuting, tootling to the pub will not be a pleasant experience, unless you have some epic roads on the journey.

For a better all rounder I would go for the 675, or GSX-R 750. I think on the road both will out perform the MV, even the 800. But the feeling on one will never be the same.

Check out your suspension settings and have a chat about the cosmetics. The rest you'll have to like or lump.

The only thing I'd swap my 675 for would be an. 800 ABS.

Or maybe a Panigale R. 899, not a chance!
 

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We rounded many a 675R and gsxr750 (most in full track trim) down to a small to nonexistent problem on the track. We have a 675r in the pack of our bikes too as seen in some of my photos even then the rider of it is faster all around on the MV. The 675R geared up 2 in the rear gives it a better chance at pulling the F3 675 out if turns but it's a toss up. The 675R we run has about 4k in it and the F3 675 is stock.
 

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I recently changed from a 750 F4 to a 675 F3 and noticed quite a difference. The F3 is definitely easier to ride in terms of ergonomics but I still lusted after the F4 engine and, to be honest, think the F4 has nicer lines and is better quality in it's manufacture. The F3 sucked around town with a snatchy feel to riding and poor engine response to throttle (probably as the revs are way to low when city riding). I'm now getting used to it and pushing along at quite a good pace (including revs no lower than 6,000 rpm and that's just whilst cruising) and am finding it a great bike to ride. Played in both sport mode and normal mode with one city trip in rain mode on a wet but not raining road (what a shocker but probably really good in the wet and in the country) and am yet to decide which to ride in. It will probably depend on the weather (currently winter with damp/wet/cold roads and ridden in normal mode but summer with warm dry conditions will mean sport mode). It has taken some time to get used to the bike (about 3,000 kms) but I'm definitely liking it and have been told that I'm quite a bit faster on the F3 than the F4. Not surprising considering an age difference of 10 years between the bikes and the corresponding advances in design and technology plus the F3 is about 20 kg lighter than the F4 .

There is also the 'exclusivity' or 'something other than the norm' factor to consider. I have Ducatis but am now over them as they are 'common'. You see them every day of the week and everywhere. Don't get me wrong, the baby Panigale and the multistrada are both awesome bikes for the average rider with the baby Pani possibly being a better bike than the F3 in the hands of most riders on the road (where absolute performance is seldom seen, used or needed). I will definitely take a baby Pani for a serious splat when the weather improves (a few friends have volunteered their bikes).

I am of the belief (echoed by some of the posts) that when you buy a 'new' bike, be it brand new or second hand, that you should have some money set aside for the setting the suspension up for you. This covers such areas as your weight, riding style, type of riding (touring, commuting, scratching on local roads, track) etc. This may be as simple as adjustment of existing components or be a tad more extensive requiring the replacement of the existing which may mean for the rear a new spring or even a new shock whilst the front may require springs, oil etc. Not cheap but the difference to riding and rider confidence of a well set up bike is enormous. Suspension should also be set up by an expert and not the mate next door who rides bikes really, really fast.

As for the other gripes .. part of owning anything from Italian manufacturers is that they are not perfect. The Italians seem to have a gift for creating something absolutely stunning in both style and performance and once this is done they move onto the next project with little care for the details related to manufacture, quality and creature comforts required by people today. Yes, there are major improvements from 30 years ago but they are still behind the Japanese in many aspects and, if you are after value for money then go Japanese but you will forgo the 'passion' that goes with owning an Italian bike (or for that matter any other 'exotic' bike).

anyhow, that's my two bobs worth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i do have basic suspension know how and altered rebound and dampening aswell and it is better but like you say it feels fine when ridden hard but you cant ride the bike hard constantly on the roads,i have tried to find someone to supply correct springs for weight but their doesnt seem to be any one in uk,at the moment the bike is faster than me but ive only spent few hours on it
 

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How do you mean no one in the UK? Have you tried The usual suspects? JHS, Steve Jordan, Reactive, H&M, Maxton and the in Norfolk etc? I know of two F3's running after market shocks and subsequently springs. As above, I'm not much lighter than you and according to H&M the spring was fine for my weight, a little on the stiff side, but not bad. Are you 11.5 with kit on or without. I'm 11 without kit.

Not sure if you've come off a different bike, but it will take you a few hundred miles, if not more, to get used to it. When I went GSX-R to ZX6-R I had only been riding under a year. I hated the ZX6-R and left it at a friend's for 2 months, convinced I would sell it. I rode it for a month out of necessity and kept it for 2 years! The MV has taken a professional suspension set up and almost 2000 miles for me to start feeling with it.

Potentially sounds to me you are trying to achieve something not possible with the standard shock. I'd say combined with your other gripes you may have the wrong bike.

Very disappointing to hear about another rippled tank though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
do you know what settings your running,i prefer to try get standard set up to work before buying springs etc thanks
 

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I don't know much about suspension but was under the impression the first thing to adjust was static sag and until that is set up then rebound and damping settings won't be right.
 

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So 11.5 primitive stone is +/- 73kg or 160 odd lb.
What worries me the most is that someone buys a modern day Sport bike, can't translate his weight into modern terminology, never mind realising that this suspension shit is adjustable by screwdriver and not chisel.
Jokes aside Bazz, there's work to be done if you're open minded enough mate.
 

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Static sag not as overwhelmingly important and rider sag. Although to do the job correctly you should account for static sag first then adjust rider sag to see if you need to change spring rates.

Static sag = weight of the bike on the suspension

Rider sag = weight of rider on the suspension.
 

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14lbs or 6.35kg :):)
Yes strangely we still stones for personal weight as well as Kg in the UK.

Not sure what my other settings are, I'm moving house at the moment and all my bike stuff is packed away.

My settings are appropriate for me and my style of riding so may not be right for you, especially as you may be looking for something quite soft.

Just looking at my bike today, there looks to be a fair bit of adjustment either way, so you shouldn't have too much issue getting the bike set up for you.

I'd recommend going somewhere and getting it sorted. Usually about £100. Best money I ever spent on the F3 and the ZX6-R.
 
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