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I found this video to be one of the best, purely bequase everyone has their own opinion of how it should be done.
The answer is within this video for those who wonder:

 

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AS expected.
 

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Have you seen how they run a motorcycle engine BEFORE they even put it in the frame? Right to redline.
 

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Have you seen how they run a motorcycle engine BEFORE they even put it in the frame? Right to redline.
I've heard this before, that said it would be in a totally unloaded state without any drive train drag or weight load on it.

I personally go with a mechanically sympathetic approach. I let the engine warm, stick to the manufacturer revs to begin with, vary the revs and then a little later go a thousand or so over every now and then gradually increase the revs towards the end of the run in period. This allows all the thermodynamic expansion to occur gradually without putting sudden heat shock into the engine although I suspect nowadays most of the parts are probably pre-treated. On my delivery miles ZXR750 I ran Millers competition running in mineral oil for the first 500 miles then switched to fully synthetic, although with hindsight maybe I would have been better with a semi synth for the second part of the bedding in, then gone to fully Synth!

As the chap in the video says, the other aspect is allowing the rest of the bike to bed in and significantly; if anything is not quite right it is likely to manifest itself in the first 500+miles. Better for it to occur at lower speeds. The first service is supposed to include checking and retorquing of various components.

Each to their own. It's good to know that there isn't a significant difference in ring sealing, which was the main argument for the thrash it method that I never subscribed to, so I'm even happier to continue as I always have. :)
 

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My break in method usually involves simply riding the bike the way I normally ride a bike. Since I’m not a squid, nor a person who tends to redline my machines, all of them have servived well.
 

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Visiting the MV factory in 2016 the last job before final inspection on a brutale was a complete rev and torque rundown before ready to ship, sure it was on a rolling road to do this, seemed pretty harsh imho.
Obviously it did not go through the temperature cycles we put them through when breaking in.
 

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To each their own. Whatever makes you comfortable is what you should do. I have never subscribed to the break in method requested by manufacturers. I have also not beat the crap out of my brand new vehicles either but certainly didn't treat them like frail children. On my motorcycles, tires being the main concern, I am careful for the first 50 miles and then, like Chuck, I ride/drive my normal routine which may or may not include an occasional red line. :grin2:
 

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I've heard about revving the bike when it is new to the red line to get the piston rings to seal properly.

It seems brutal to do it on a brand new engine.
 

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Notice in the video that all they checked was the top end. There are a lot of other things spinning and sliding around in the engine. Crankshaft, transmission etc.

I would think giving everybody a chance to get to know each other before putting the bike to a max load for long periods would be prudent...not to mention, as Ari said, getting to know your new bike too.

And don't forget suspension/brakes, etc.

But then, when the race team builds the bike for the coming race there isn't much break-in done, though most run the motor on the dyno just to make sure it's doing what it's supposed and isn't going t blow up on the starting line.
 

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I used to work in a Subaru dealership many moons ago. When the Impreza STi was first released, demand for test drives was such that against my advice to run it in properly, it was hammered almost from scratch. It went through 2 engines in a couple of thousand miles before the third engine was run in correctly and was fine. Apparently the tolerances were tighter on STi’s which also ran hypereutectic pistons. I can’t remember if the failures were big end or piston related now (I believe it was big end), either way, clearly being brutal wasn’t the way to break that engine in!
 

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Break-in or not break-in...

Some engines have tighter tolerance than others. Not sure a standard japanese bike enter in the tighter tolerance range (almost sure of the opposite).
2000 Triumph Daytona 955i MY 2000, benched it at 1000 kms : 78bhp. Benched it at 22000 kms : 135bhp. When the engine have tight tolerances, the break-in plays a lot: it impacts power, longevity and oil consumption.

And yes, any bike prepared for track would go for a shorter break-in, more brutal. I remember a dealer telling me about this : it doesn't really matter, the engine would be replaced at about 15000kms. And the same guy would advise not to buy a reformed track engine unless it was rebuild from ground with new parts (including cylinders and all mobile equipment …)

In other words, would expect to see the same study with an engine with tight tolerances. I'm not sure the results would be the same (almost sure they would be different from what I discussed within the past with owners of Moto-Guzzi, Ducati, Triumph, etc...)
 
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