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Discussion Starter #1
has anyone else here heard about U.S. models( and possibly others) being limited to running on three cylinders under 5000 RPM's for federal emission requirements?
 

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mmmmm.... and this even though no signing of Kyoto??? :stickpoke :stickpoke :eek:

Doc
 

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Discussion Starter #4
found out that it only does this on deceleration. was explained as some sort of "slipper clutch" type of function. could still use a better explaination if anyone knows
 

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Ah ok, makes more sense now :)

What you are talking about is EBS, Engine Brake System. The F4 1000 uses a solenoid to open a valve to limit back torque...actually just read here:

http://www.mvagustausa.com/web-mvagusta/f41000-tech.html

"The new engine differs from the 750EV unit by the introduction of the EBS (Engine Brake System) an innovative system that does not work on the clutch but directly on the intake system in order to reduce the engine braking. The system takes advantage of a valve positioned on the cylinder #2 exhaust pipe found downstream of the intake. This device permits the #2 cylinder to distribute torque in the detached phase (or when the throttle bodies are closed) through a totally electronic control system. Observing the table (right), the advantage in terms of high and medium rpm engine brake reduction appear evident. The F4 1000 engine, in addition to being high-performance, is also in line with the most recent pollution standards thanks to a catalyser housed in a new exhaust commutator that flows in the celebrated "pipe organ" mufflers. "

or

http://www.cycleworld.com/article.asp?section_id=12&article_id=22&page_number=2

""while the Engine Braking System controls the engine on overrun.

The latter works through an ostensibly simple air bleed on the engine side of the number 2 cylinder's throttle butterfly. The ECU controls an air valve and also delivers a small amount of fuel via the standard injector on deceleration that gives the engine a throaty, staccato growl when you chop the throttle and provides just enough horsepower to overcome a significant portion of the engine and drivetrain's internal friction and high compression. And while this technique does sound pretty simple, how well it works hints to some refined programming. Its function is better than a slipper clutch and stability while using the excellent brakes is superb. Even in normal street riding there are benefits—when you roll off the throttle, the front end doesn't load as much in corners, keeping steering light and neutral. At the same time, there is "enough" engine braking, and the system works so transparently that the bike never feels like it is freewheeling.""
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks James
a good deal of info to comprehend but, it all makes sense. So, does this make installing a slipper clutch redundant?
 

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bradger said:
thanks James
a good deal of info to comprehend but, it all makes sense. So, does this make installing a slipper clutch redundant?



YES!
 
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