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Discussion Starter #1
I was looking and i was wondering whats the difference between the two?

Senna VS 1000R

also wasnt the senna the lowest price Limited?

I was thinking the senna was a Pre model R?

so im curious
 

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The Senna is an R with a different shock and a bunch of carbon fiber. The fork tubes are anodized black instead of gold. Actually when I went for my first service and looked at the Senna I was actually surprized at what a relative bargain it is. If you add up the cost of the shock and all the CF bits it is definitely worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
style_one said:
no, it's got the lighter brembo superlights. but i think the marc's have more style.

thats what i thought, if i had to choose id get a senna anyday,but the r is still cool
 

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antonioshabirto said:
I believe both Tambu and Senna is abt the same. Not much of a difference.

Not sure why Tambu is much expensive .....
They are VERY different ..... the Tam has a lot of Magnesium parts, carbon fiber body panels, as well as the variable intake system (just to name a few - there are more). Not even close.

The Senna may be a better performer as it has more contemporary technology (debateable), but as far as an artistic build and the keen use of exotic materials, the Tamburini is peerless.
 

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G.Rand said:
They are VERY different ..... the Tam has a lot of Magnesium parts, carbon fiber body panels, as well as the variable intake system (just to name a few - there are more). Not even close.

The Senna may be a better performer as it has more contemporary technology (debateable), but as far as an artistic build and the keen use of exotic materials, the Tamburini is peerless.
Ic.... thanks for the info.....Im only aware of it after you mention them.

Can you pls explaing more abt the Variable intake system ?

What the difference bet the 2 bikes ?

Rgds
 

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I lifted this from a Cycle World write-up I found on the net:


The heart of the F4 1000 TAMBURINI's performance is the revolutionary TSS system (Torque Shift System) based on the concept of variable intake geometry. This is an absolute first in motorcycling history and is the first time such an innovation has been fitted to a mass-produced motorcycle. The result is an engine that offers an immediate response from even the lowest revs and maximum torque positioning (83.1 ft-lbs @ 9,200 rpm) that comes in at about 1,000 rpm less than the F4-1000-S. This incredible performance is despite the use of cam profiles that are more oriented to track than road use.

First, some physics. When a piston drops on its intake stroke, a deep vacuum of about half an atmosphere is immediately created in the intake tract. This propagates from the piston crown toward the intake's open end—the bellmouth—at the local speed of sound (fast!). When it reaches the end, atmospheric pressure rushes in to fill that partial vacuum, creating a reflected pressure pulse that crashes back down the intake pipe as a wave toward the valves. If our wave returns to the cylinder just before the intake valves close, the pressure in that wave will be added to the pressure in the cylinder, making a denser charge that equals higher combustion pressure and increased torque.

Often there is not room on a motorcycle for intake pipes of the necessary length, so the designer will allow the intake wave to make two or more trips up and down a shorter intake pipe. Each reflection of the waves loses some of its intensity, but compromises are the engineer's stock in trade.

By using an intake pipe of ideal length for the desired rpm, a torque gain of the order of 10 percent may be achieved—but only across a limited rpm range. To have both a robust midrange (the Tamburini's peak torque on the CW dyno comes at 8700 rpm) and strong top end calls for having two different intake lengths. This is just what TSS delivers. The MV's four throttle bodies have short, permanent bellmouths suited to top-end power, but a set of moveable extension bellmouths is carried on a pair of linear bearings. Below 10,000 rpm, these extensions are in place, creating a longer intake tract that boosts torque. Above 10,000 revs, a Pierburg pneumatic actuator (run on engine vacuum) snaps the extensions up and out of the way, shortening the intake tract to boost breathing and thus power on the top end. This is a two-state system—it is not progressive—as the extensions are moved in or out of use within 0.15 of a second.

Because the change of intake length is carried out at an rpm between peak torque and peak power, where the engine's torque is less dependent upon intake length, torque at the "shift" point does not change greatly.
 

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style_one said:
no, it's got the lighter brembo superlights. but i think the marc's have more style.
I'm looking forward to seeing the superlights in silver, I'm surprised no-one has them on yet I think they'd look :smoking: ...maybe the new/next MV :naughty: but having the Marchesini's I can come up with a great reason for opting for the Brembo's apart from weight and thats they look a shitload easier to clean :laughing: :bawling: :ahhh: :crazyeyes

I love my Marchesini's but I'm anal about keeping the bike clean and those things although they look great are a royal PITA th keep clean.
 
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