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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I feel like it's blasphemy to even consider this, much less post it on here, but I trust your judgement.

After racking my brain for what I really want to be able to do on two wheels, I'm debating switching over to the cruiser side. Comfort has been a bit of an issue for me, (I'm 6' 220lbs (100kg) and training to gain more), and I would love to have a comfy upright seat. I also want to be able to take day trips riding two-up. The girls that usually ride with me are both around 120-130lbs, and I feel like that's asking a lot out of the brute for city driving.

I didn't intend to sell before the end of the season, but I've had two offers so far around $6500, and one person willing to trade their harley nightster (I don't like harleys, but in its condition, that one was worth over $7k). Unfortunately, owning 2 bikes is simply out of my budget right now.

Thoughts? I bought the bike last year for $5500, and I've put about $1100 into it this year to fix the clutch and headlight. Bike is a 2004 with 13,200 miles on it, only aftermarket parts are the mirrors.
 

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I'd make that trade in a heartbeat. $7000 for an F4 750 is all the money, so if the Harley is worth that and you are comfortable on it, do it. Bit you are going to be sorely disappointed in the handling, acceleration, and braking dept. The sportster is probably a little small for you to ride comfortably. I think at a minimum you need a soft tail, and preferably a touring class bike.
 

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...besides, how many bikes out there can carry two girls and you !
 

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Is the Harley a Nightster (Softail) or Sportster (Sportster) there's a huge difference. 7K for a Nightster, depending on year & mileage is pretty good, especially with the 96ci motor. You'd be happy with it as a cruiser, I had an 07 Softail Custom (virtually the same bike with different handlebars & seat) & loved it. Good luck with your decision, but be prepared for a major shock regarding performance, handling, etc.

Cheers,
Glenn
 

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I stand corrected, I was thinking of the Nightrain (Softail).
I'm similar to you in size & at 6' & 225lbs I did not like the ride at all (on a 1200 Sporster Custom) & that was solo. Lots of vibration even though the motor was rubber mounted. Cruising on it all day, especially with a passenger, would not be enjoyable. At least not for me.
Good luck with your decision.
Cheers,
Glenn
 

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for 6500 i wouldn't have doubts, you'd only lose 100 bucks so in all honesty you would have owned it "for free". that's top dollar for a 750 :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm pretty sure the Nightster is a sportster.
It is, and the one girl I mentioned in OP would probably kill me if i went for it, since she's trying to sell a '13 sportster 883 she won at the philly wingbowl a few months ago. (she yelled at me last time i posted a picture, but feel free to google "bella" from wingbowl 22)

I also saw a kawasaki vulcan meanstreak on CL that would consider a straight trade... that kind of power might be a little better of a transition for me, and already has a lot of the aftermarkets i'd want.
 

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I was thinking the same, to trade for a harley. However, I have decided to keep the MV. It turns out I won't get any more mile range per tank with the harley like I thought it would (90 miles on the forty-fight).
Also, I already sorted all the issues you get with MV 2004 (SPU, metal fuel connectors, hub) and more. And the red is just awesome on that model.
I just need to ride the bike in a nice way, even though the power underneath is hitching me to get used all the time. It is quiet possible, and it is there if needed.
I would still want a harley, but I won't sell my MV for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was thinking the same, to trade for a harley. However, I have decided to keep the MV. It turns out I won't get any more mile range per tank with the harley like I thought it would (90 miles on the forty-fight).
Also, I already sorted all the issues you get with MV 2004 (SPU, metal fuel connectors, hub) and more. And the red is just awesome on that model.
I just need to ride the bike in a nice way, even though the power underneath is hitching me to get used all the time. It is quiet possible, and it is there if needed.
I would still want a harley, but I won't sell my MV for it.
This is what has me going back and forth, i LOVE my bike. The main factors that have me considering trading/selling are comfort for longer rides and 2ups, and getting 200+ miles from a tank
 

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This is what has me going back and forth, i LOVE my bike. The main factors that have me considering trading/selling are comfort for longer rides and 2ups, and getting 200+ miles from a tank
For comfort, it could be how you sit on your bike. You can either put your weight on your arms, or hold yourself in position with your knees.
The later one is much more comfortable. I have done +500 miles without issues about comfort (non stop, aside the mandatory petrol stops).

I heard people complaining about harleys comfort just as much (bad roads in your lower back).
I don't know how much of that is just people ranting down something because they don't/can't have one.

All that is why I wouldn't sell my bike for an harley. I would buy an harley and then compare.
It would be too bad to sell this one to find out I'm not happy with the replacement one.
 

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if you want a harley for comfort, be prepared to throw some money at it since they all have:

- shitty stock suspension
- shitty stock seats
- shitty stock brakes
 

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The suspensions on the new touring class bikes are quite good.
If you aren't comfortable on the stock seat, Harley and a dozen aftermarket manufacturers make dozens of them. You are sure to find one that fits.
The brakes are a weak point. They now have dual rotors in front which helps, but you're not going to stop an 800 pound bike as quickly as a sport bike.

I would like to see better brakes. Other than that, I wouldn't change anything about mine.
 

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if you want a harley for comfort, be prepared to throw some money at it since they all have:

- shitty stock suspension
- shitty stock seats
- shitty stock brakes
I have one...and that quote is BS.

Brembo brakes
Air ride suspension.
Heated seat.


Of course, it is not a base model.
 

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If you're riding a Harley cruiser like it's designed to be ridden (60% or so), the brakes are fine. If you're riding WFO then they're not. My '03 Heritage has only one front rotor, weighs close to 750 or so, and has never scared me because I ride it nice and easy. Shocks and seat? Agreed, but again, LOTS of aftermarket help there.
 

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I'm able to haul my 980 pound Ultra down to zero from 90 two-up pretty damn quick. Twin 320 mm rotors and plenty of Brembo two-finger master to work with. If I use the rear that pig stops quickly.
 

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No, I did not say that.

I said it wasn't a base model. Neither is my 312R, or my 1090RR or my S4Rs.

I have a non-modified, off the shelf, HD CVO Ultra Classic.

Now returning to an earlier post about riding positions and back issues: The riding position on a HD puts your feet forward of your pelvis. The riding position of a sport bike puts your feet under your pelvis. That difference changes the ergonomics of your spine. In a sport bike position, your pelvis is rotated forward and your spine's natural curvature is restored allowing the shock absorbing characteristics to be utilized.

On a feet-forward cruiser, your pelvis is rotated such that your spine is bowed backward putting strain on the lumbar region and reducing shock carrying capability.

Additionally, on a sport bike, with your feet under your pelvis you can lift your weight and suspend load, even slightly, to gain additional shock absorption. Your arms also provide absorption and your knees provide stabilization to your core muscles so that your entire body is being used to dissipate the effect of road shock ... if positioned properly and using your core strength.

On the cruiser, you are relying on the bike's suspension to protect you while your lower back is in a vulnerable configuration.

I've ridden all of my bikes for at least 500 miles in a day. The cruiser produces more "Monkey Butt" and lower back pain than any of my other bikes...even with the adjustable air suspension.

It's a question of ergonomics. An experiment for the kids to try at home: Find a nice sturdy small chair and place it in a normal position just far enough form a table or desk edge that you can sit on the front edge of the chair and comfortably grab the edge of the table/desk. Now, stick your feet out in front of you under the table and hold the edge of the table and lean back...but not as far as to rest on the back of the chair. Stay that way for fifteen minutes.

Conversely: With the chair in the same position, put you feet in a position behind you butt, toes on the floor and lean your hands on the table edge....stay that way for fifteen minutes

This little experiment should help clarify things.
 
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