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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

New guy here. It happens that I am going to view a low mileage (less than 5000 thousand) MV F4 750S on Friday and I am wondering if this could be a potential good bike.

In the pictures it looks mint, the rear bearing has been checked by the dealer and it is in good condition. No valve clearance check yet as the bike is less than 7500 miles so I guess this one will be for me to sort out if I eventually buy it.

The bike is imported and had two previous owners, but given the mileage the bike has barely been driven I think. I will obviously request history of bike and receipts and stuff... overall it looks like a potential good buy.

I was wondering if I should go for it or if I should wait for a later model such as an EV03, which I believe it is more reliable. Is there a big difference between the two? I mean, apart from the improved engine. Are the earlier models more prone to issues than later ones? Anything I should check for while visually inspecting the bike?

Thanks in advance,
 

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Hi, and welcome.

Imported from where to where, and when? Nothing wrong with imports, but I would want to find out why? An entrepreneur seeking profits or someone covering up a theft are two common themes. History check will be important.

The chance to pick up a good low mileage 750 shouldn't be delayed on the 'possibility' of finding something better (EVO3) at a future date. I think most of us buy these bikes with our heart. :love:
 

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Hi F4AL, Please introduce yourself in the new members section. What country are you from?

I have an early 2000 model, with 25,000 miles, very good reliability, I think it was the starter relay failed in 10yrs of ownership, it was a cheap fix.
The mechanic at the dealers I bought it from at 10yrs old with 8000 miles refused to do the valve clearances as he said they will not be out(based on all the one's he's looked at). I had them checked at 17000 and really they were fine with some very minor adjustments made for the sake of it whilst taken apart.

This early one, check it has 2 rads, particularly if you will do any slow riding and or a hot country. As it is imported will it have the correct projector beam for the head light for your country? You may have to replace fuel lines etc, see if it runs well. If power is important to you the EVO3 has 11 more HP.

See Bobs thread here as he has just bought an early 750: Customer Service sucks! You may have to skim the pages a little but some of it should be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hi everyone. Thanks for your quick responses

Hi, and welcome.

Imported from where to where, and when? Nothing wrong with imports, but I would want to find out why? An entrepreneur seeking profits or someone covering up a theft are two common themes. History check will be important.

The chance to pick up a good low mileage 750 shouldn't be delayed on the 'possibility' of finding something better (EVO3) at a future date. I think most of us buy these bikes with our heart. :love:
The bike is imported however I don't know where from yet. I live in the UK, the bike has been here since 2016 and it has barely covered any miles since imported. My guess is that is has been kept in a private collection. The seller is a dealer, they have good reviews and the communication with the owner/person in charge has been great so far.

Thanks for your answer, that's basically what I was trying to find out! Most of the buying advice I have read they all seem to recommend the EV03 rather than the earlier model, that's why I was not sure if it was a good decision. Not even 5000 miles and the bike looks in great shape:






Hi F4AL, Please introduce yourself in the new members section. What country are you from?

I have an early 2000 model, with 25,000 miles, very good reliability, I think it was the starter relay failed in 10yrs of ownership, it was a cheap fix.
The mechanic at the dealers I bought it from at 10yrs old with 8000 miles refused to do the valve clearances as he said they will not be out(based on all the one's he's looked at). I had them checked at 17000 and really they were fine with some very minor adjustments made for the sake of it whilst taken apart.

This early one, check it has 2 rads, particularly if you will do any slow riding and or a hot country. As it is imported will it have the correct projector beam for the head light for your country? You may have to replace fuel lines etc, see if it runs well. If power is important to you the EVO3 has 11 more HP.

See Bobs thread here as he has just bought an early 750: Customer Service sucks! You may have to skim the pages a little but some of it should be helpful.
Hi MVBERT, apologies for not introducing myself. I live in the UK, as I mentioned earlier, the bike was imported in 2016 but I still don't know where from. I am not that keen on power, 126hp are more than enough for me! Not planning in doing many miles with it, I am buying the bike with the heart really for the odd Sunday morning ride (subject to weather). Definitely not daily/commuting bike. It was either this or a Ducati 998, dream bikes since I was a kid. Perhaps the Ducati is a better buy in terms of market, but the MV Agusta aesthetics are unbeatable, it is a stunning work of art!

Thanks for the thread you linked it has a lot of interesting info, learnt many things from it. I will definitely have a look on the fairing to check for cracks. There is a downside and that is that I currently live in an apartment. I have parking and while it is a gated community it is outdoors therefore I am considering storing the bike in a safe storage or closed garage for the time being. I won't have space or the means to work on the bike so if something needs to be checked this is something to consider too.

I will keep you updated, I can't wait for Friday!

Cheers,

AL
 

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Hi and welcome.

Looks very nice. I would check the age of the tyres (there'll be a date on the tyre wall), since you intend to use it, if they are more than 5-7 years old I would certainly ask the dealer to replace them or take some money off, or at the very least you should budget for a new set. Look for any recent service history, if not, again, budget for brake fluid change, oil/oil filter change at the least and expect to have to replace the fuel hoses/plastic quick connects/fuel filter at some point as pre-emptive maintenance for trouble free running. Someone like X-bikes could collect/deliver the bike and sort those things out if you have no means of doing yourself or a decent tech/dealer if you have one nearby.
 

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I'd ask what checking the rear bearing actually entails. Given the age and mileage I'd want to wash inspect and re-grease the roller bearing and replace the ball bearing. Of course it is highly unlikely there would be any issue with the roller bearing unless it was damaged and not replaced after a previous failure of the ball bearing.

The air filter would be worth a look too unless you know its history.

And find out where it was imported from and check the ecu. It may be from a power restricted market.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi and welcome.

Looks very nice. I would check the age of the tyres (there'll be a date on the tyre wall), since you intend to use it, if they are more than 5-7 years old I would certainly ask the dealer to replace them or take some money off, or at the very least you should budget for a new set. Look for any recent service history, if not, again, budget for brake fluid change, oil/oil filter change at the least and expect to have to replace the fuel hoses/plastic quick connects/fuel filter at some point as pre-emptive maintenance for trouble free running. Someone like X-bikes could collect/deliver the bike and sort those things out if you have no means of doing yourself or a decent tech/dealer if you have one nearby.
Thanks for that Nito. I will make sure I check for these things and take them into consideration. Any idea on much would it cost servicing the bike to get all those things done? (brake fluid, oil and filter change, fuel hoses and filters..). Just need to have a rough idea, that would be enough.

I'd ask what checking the rear bearing actually entails. Given the age and mileage I'd want to wash inspect and re-grease the roller bearing and replace the ball bearing. Of course it is highly unlikely there would be any issue with the roller bearing unless it was damaged and not replaced after a previous failure of the ball bearing.

The air filter would be worth a look too unless you know its history.

And find out where it was imported from and check the ecu. It may be from a power restricted market.
Noted. The dealer already told me that this was the first they checked when they received the bike, but I will double check on Friday. Regarding the ECU, that's a good point, will definitely ask.
 

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. . . I would check the age of the tyres (there'll be a date on the tyre wall), since you intend to use it, if they are more than 5-7 years old I would certainly ask the dealer to replace them or take some money off, or at the very least you should budget for a new set. . .
Interesting, and valid, point @Nito .

Also interesting that our UK MoT (roadworthiness laws) do not include age of tyre as a fault or even matter of concern. There is all manner of hype about tread depth, bulges, fraying canvas etc, but nought about dates:

I don't take issue with you on this, but mention it merely as a matter of interest because we could have a 'shady' dealer selling a bike with an MoT with twelve-plus year-old tyres on it.

I do have a couple of bikes with 5 - 7 year-old tyres on. I have no reservation about using them for general Sunday runs, but would not be happy using them on track. Horses for courses I guess. Obviously I would be more concerned if there was evidence of sidewall cracking.

I have just noticed that @F4AL has posted while I write this so I'll leave it here.
 

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I have put 10 000kms on my 2000 750 (now has 25000 total) and nothing specifically unreliable to that year model. The ECU fuel injector drivers failed, but is is a 20 year old ECU. It was an easy fix. At that age in addition to oil,coolant, brake fluid etc you may want to service the suspension as most people wouldn't have touched it.

Looking at what you are showing I would jump at it without reservation :)
 

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I'd budget for say;

£280ish for decent tyres.
£150 consumables (oil/oil filter/brake fluid/fuel filter/air filter/fuel hose)
£75 Metal fuel connectors
+ around 6 hours labour at whatever hourly rate is and any carriage costs if it's being collected/delivered.
 

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I do have a couple of bikes with 5 - 7 year-old tyres on. I have no reservation about using them for general Sunday runs, but would not be happy using them on track. Horses for courses I guess. Obviously I would be more concerned if there was evidence of sidewall cracking.
I'm happy with up to 7 years, beyond that I've noticed they start to harden and loose grip. My Tuono tyres (can't remember date but I've not changed them in 7 years) have gone hard and don't have enough grip for the power it has. The F4 tyres are 7 years old and still feel supple and seem to be ok on grip. My Caponord had 10 year old tyres on them and the front had started cracking.



I guess it depends on use, storage, temperature etc.Some people say 5 years.

In my experience I'd recommend 5-7 years. Which is pay close attention after 5 years, beyond 7 years I think one needs to be thinking about changing them and at the very least be aware that the performance may be compromised.Not such an issue in summer with a low powered bike. My Tuono spun up the back wheel (not on full throttle) returning from an mot last year when I went under some trees that had shaded the road from the sun and must have had a little damp patch. It's on the to do list ;)
 

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F4AL, That old girl looks good,

It has the same carbon fibre rear mudguard(standard bike had no mudguard) as mine and the same after market rear indicators. The pillion foot rests have been taken off, hopefully the dealer has them?

The bellypan has the classic right side split in it. This will need fixing or let it get worse. You will need some exhaust wrap and good heat shielding done very well. The side stand is catching the bellypan like mine did(which is really crap and a known problem). I have heard if you put some washers in the right place it won't, can't confirm that. I just got my painter to alter(dished very slighty) the bellypan, they did an excellent job if I didn't tell you 'you would not spot it.'

The bike will run hot at slow speeds(due to loosing cooling airflow) a manual fan switch is the most effective answer, I switch mine on before I even start to slow down as this helps, waiting to the heat builds then having the ECU come on late is not as effective. Seen as it sounds like you are concerned about costs this is a cheap fix, the same goes for the above belly pan split. If you don't do any thing like wrap the pipe or stop the engine temp from rising the pipe which is 10mm or so from the belly pan on the right side can get 200C hotter by the time the engine display temp reaches 105C, which will just increase the speed in which damage occurs.

These early bikes have retarded ignition timing which makes them run hotter, ask if anything has been done to address this via the ECU.
The black plastic injector cover, the rear well nuts, if the brass nut separates from the rubber it will drop onto the butterfly valve and thus into the engine. See if the bike has a rivnut mod or similar done.

I had my self semi retracting side stand disabled after it retracted to far causing me to drop the bike. Also when you get off the bike pull back on the bars to make the stand be fully engaged.

The fairing screen is not standard as is prob a double bubble.

If you are changing tyres, the front on that bike is '70' should be a 65. Pirelli do the Diablo Rossa III(good tyres) in a Front 120/65/17 and paired with a Rear of 180/55/17 will help the bike turn better. They should be coming into the UK mid August. When I asked a Pirelli technician he told me 34psi front and rear for road use for the MV.
 

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Welcome to the family @F4AL !!
How about making an introduction in the "New Members" section? And add your locale to your profile information, please.
Nice looking bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'd budget for say;

£280ish for decent tyres.
£150 consumables (oil/oil filter/brake fluid/fuel filter/air filter/fuel hose)
£75 Metal fuel connectors
+ around 6 hours labour at whatever hourly rate is and any carriage costs if it's being collected/delivered.
Thanks for that Nito!

I have put 10 000kms on my 2000 750 (now has 25000 total) and nothing specifically unreliable to that year model. The ECU fuel injector drivers failed, but is is a 20 year old ECU. It was an easy fix. At that age in addition to oil,coolant, brake fluid etc you may want to service the suspension as most people wouldn't have touched it.

Looking at what you are showing I would jump at it without reservation :)
Thanks for that. I will pay a deposit on Friday if I like what I see (y)

F4AL, That old girl looks good,

It has the same carbon fibre rear mudguard(standard bike had no mudguard) as mine and the same after market rear indicators. The pillion foot rests have been taken off, hopefully the dealer has them?

The bellypan has the classic right side split in it. This will need fixing or let it get worse. You will need some exhaust wrap and good heat shielding done very well. The side stand is catching the bellypan like mine did(which is really crap and a known problem). I have heard if you put some washers in the right place it won't, can't confirm that. I just got my painter to alter(dished very slighty) the bellypan, they did an excellent job if I didn't tell you 'you would not spot it.'

The bike will run hot at slow speeds(due to loosing cooling airflow) a manual fan switch is the most effective answer, I switch mine on before I even start to slow down as this helps, waiting to the heat builds then having the ECU come on late is not as effective. Seen as it sounds like you are concerned about costs this is a cheap fix, the same goes for the above belly pan split. If you don't do any thing like wrap the pipe or stop the engine temp from rising the pipe which is 10mm or so from the belly pan on the right side can get 200C hotter by the time the engine display temp reaches 105C, which will just increase the speed in which damage occurs.

These early bikes have retarded ignition timing which makes them run hotter, ask if anything has been done to address this via the ECU.
The black plastic injector cover, the rear well nuts, if the brass nut separates from the rubber it will drop onto the butterfly valve and thus into the engine. See if the bike has a rivnut mod or similar done.

I had my self semi retracting side stand disabled after it retracted to far causing me to drop the bike. Also when you get off the bike pull back on the bars to make the stand be fully engaged.

The fairing screen is not standard as is prob a double bubble.

If you are changing tyres, the front on that bike is '70' should be a 65. Pirelli do the Diablo Rossa III(good tyres) in a Front 120/65/17 and paired with a Rear of 180/55/17 will help the bike turn better. They should be coming into the UK mid August. When I asked a Pirelli technician he told me 34psi front and rear for road use for the MV.
Wow, so much attention to detail, I did not spot those things myself. Thank you mate there is tons of useful info in there. I would not expect for a bike with such low miles to have those "issues" already. I mean, I was aware of the overheating but I wouldn't expect a split on the fairing already at less than 5000 miles.

I zoomed in as you said, I spotted the split myself. I will have to factor in these costs into the investment and hopefully this will help to negotiate with the dealer. More than the cost of fixing, I am more concerned about the lack of tools and space to work on the bike. That is, any minor work would probably require taking the bike into a shop to get fix. And if right after purchasing the bike it already needs small fixes here and there I am definitely not paying the asking price.

Spot on, you are right the front wheel is a 120/70! I have in my notes that it should be 65 as you said. Any idea on why they fitted the wrong tyre? Does not make much sense to me.

Welcome to the family @F4AL !!
How about making an introduction in the "New Members" section? And add your locale to your profile information, please.
Nice looking bike.
Thanks mate, I had location information but it was set to private. Now it shows that I am in the UK. Will introduce myself now :)
 

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AL, They are often fitted with a 70 Front because of availability, I am a bit on the fussy side so ask about availability of the right size. This chap Peter is very good and 100% reliable to deal with his prices are very good to: Buy Pirelli Diablo Rosso 3 Sport Motorcycle Tyres | TyreTec Trading The rear at 180/55/17 will give you quicker turning than the stock 190/50/17 size, and the bike will still stay very stable.

Where is this bike? Do they have a workshop so you can request certain jobs done, I did when I got mine, unless you are in no hurry to sought stuff out.

Be aware that if you have an exhaust that is say at 500C+ 10mm or so from plastic then it doesn't take long to burn/melt. When Bob bought his bike, the same as the one your looking at with even less miles some of his heat shields were missing, this could well be that the adhesives go off with age and the heat and could fall out, they also unstick and peal back, so they need repairing/replacing and the edges sealing so they do their job properly.
 

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AL, I had a look at all the photo's and couldn't see anything wrong apart from one small thing, the after market rear CF mudguard, there is a section of it ripped off, you can see the jagged stump on the right side just above the chain, I wonder how it got like that?
 

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Did you not go for this then? I saw it on ebay this morning!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi everyone,

Sorry for the lack of updates. It has been a bit of a crazy week at work and I have not had time to let everyone know what happened!

I did check the bike last week and I decided to pass on it. Apart from the low mileage, the rest of the things I saw did not convince me. I will start off saying that the dealer could not tell me where the bike was imported from, neither any relevant servicing history of the bike. Or perhaps he did not want to, I can't understand how a dealer can get a bike without knowing every single detail about it.

Anyhow, I had to reach out myself to David Robinson and they managed to give me some useful information. The bike was imported from the Channel Islands back in 2016. It was serviced by them (ECU and engine cover powder coat). I think that the bike has not been properly stored as there was some corrosion on it. Also, as MVBERT pointed out, the belly pan was cracked due to overheating.Tyres were a bit old as well, 2009 and 2010 if I remember correctly. In other words, the bike needs some work. It wasn't overall too bad but not at that price and with no history. Here you have some pictures if anyone is interested:






















On a good note, I checked another F4 yesterday and I have just paid the deposit on it! It needs to be MOTed but apart from that it was in pristine condition. Uk bike, completely stock, new battery, full servicing history, new tyres, servicing and valve clearance just done...also monoposto. Basically the bike I was looking for and I could not pass on it. I am not expecting to get the bike delivered until 2/3 weeks as the owner has very kindly agreed to store the bike for me until I find a suitable storage for it.

I will post pictures as soon as I get it delivered. I can't wait!

Thank you everyone for all your advice so far, I learnt a lot about these bikes and what to look for. I am hoping a made a good choice. I will keep you updated!
 
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