MV Agusta Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
All,

As you know I test rode a B3 675 on Saturday and sat on a Brutale 800. Yep, I am interested. However here is what will make the decision: comfort for a 60 year old. My typical ride is 2-3 hours on Texas coastal to interior FTM roads and freeways. In between is Houston dense traffic.

My good buddy Ed recently traded his Ducati 1099 for the Diavel: the reason was the riding geometry. He is advising me against the MV purchase for the same reason.

The compact "bucket" sport bike seating really concerns me: little room to maneuver or adjust, hard seating, and very tight/compact geometry for the dangly bits. The MV naked bikes seem to be more set up like a supersport in the seating. Otherwise they are reasonably upright on the back and hands.

Without a longer ride I really hesitate to pull the trigger. So, I ask the expert owners on this forum, especially older riders: tell me about the comfort of these bikes please. Nothing is worse than the sore back/hands/neck/butt after an hour.

Much appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,577 Posts
Hey, you are 60... Not 95 ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,511 Posts
lucydad,
At 58 I guess I am one of the B800 owners who can comment on your concerns. I bought my 800 last August and use the bike daily, during the week to commute to work. This is a 60+ mile round trip mix of motorway/freeway over your side, and dense city traffic, Bristol UK.

I fitted the MV Corse seat as much for it's looks as for any comfort benefit, it was firm to begin with but with some miles on it has become very nice. The bike is for me fairly roomy to move around on, the pegs are a nice height and the bars are at a sensible rise and angle for road riding. The bike easily deals with the commute and has plenty of grunt when needed to breeze past other traffic.

On the weekends the bike gets used for some longer more spirited rides and clocks up some four or five hours riding at times, the good news is it does not give me butt ache.

I am 5' 9in tall, and medium build, a Diavel to me rides like a very overweight trolly bus, I would ignore your friend and go get a decent test ride on a Brutale, it may be firm out the box ride wise but that's the beauty of adjustable suspension, a few clicks and turns and it will do what you want.

jimboF4
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
jimbo,

Much thanks for sharing your experience! The B675 rear shock bottomed on a crap Houston road, clearly the B800 suspension is worth the costs. The action should be: soften the B800 Dragster shocks before a test ride, and see if the dealer will let me take it for more than a around the inner city block romp. Agree on the Diavel: way big and heavy for me.

Max Vel: 60 is the new 50, or 40? But I am definitely not in my thirties, or twenties!

Patience is my friend. B800 test will be end of month given my travel schedule.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,577 Posts
Well... I don't know Greg. The only thing I know is that age is relative. You have old farts of 25 and young dogs of 60. It's good to indeed find out for yourself and to an extensive testride. From a sitting position the Brutale is very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I find my B800 quite comfortable for longer rides of the two to three hour non-stop variety. I may be in the minority - I like the stock seat a lot. I don't find the windblast that bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
What's your height and weight? At 5'11", I find the B4 ergonomics most comfortable, and this was one reason why I chose the 1090RR. I did ride every production model from 2012 to 2014, some multiple times.

The triples, aside from the Rivale, while are also a good fit, do feel "compact" to me in comparison. I would speculate (did not ride any triple for more than 40 miles at a time) that more than 300 miles or so a day would start bugging me, whereas the B4 has done several 400-mile days and it felt like nothing. That said, it isn't my touring bike but it's a "bike that can".

As far as suspension, if you are 180lbs+, all of these are undersprung. B4 has higher spring rates but for me at my 210lbs without gear, it takes maxing out the preload to get reasonable -- not perfect, still too much -- sags and good handling. It works, and the suspension is quality but I will upgrade/respring/revalve eventually.

The B3 800 does not really have all that better suspension than the 675. It's just about getting the rates right in the ballpark first -- that alone will be a massive improvement.

Regarding the Dragster: its seat locks you in one place like a vice. Seems sort of great at first, actually, but even 10 miles later on a twisty road, I knew it was NOT for me. I'd think that if you have any worries about comfort with these bikes, being able to move back and forth on the seat would be of value.

When you ride the 800 B3, you will probably not want to get the 675 :)

Lastly, as someone who also has a V7R (mine's a single-TB model, and sorted very well), I'll say that it is THE most fun bike I've had. I probably would not want it to be my ONLY motorcycle but if it came down to selling either it or the Brutale, it would probably be the MV ☺ [Ducking for cover] My point is that they are just such different machines that neither would be a suitable replacement for the other. If you love the V7, you will miss it. If you can, get the MV but don't sell the little Goose :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Maka said:

Regarding the Dragster: its seat locks you in one place like a vice. Seems sort of great at first, actually, but even 10 miles later on a twisty road, I knew it was NOT for me. I'd think that if you have any worries about comfort with these bikes, being able to move back and forth on the seat would be of value.

When you ride the 800 B3, you will probably not want to get the 675

Lastly, as someone who also has a V7R (mine's a single-TB model, and sorted very well), I'll say that it is THE most fun bike I've had. I probably would not want it to be my ONLY motorcycle but if it came down to selling either it or the Brutale, it would probably be the MV ☺ [Ducking for cover] My point is that they are just such different machines that neither would be a suitable replacement for the other. If you love the V7, you will miss it. If you can, get the MV but don't sell the little Goose

Lucydad thanks Makarushka for sharing. I am 5 ft five tall and weigh 170 or so. Call me small but fierce?

Yes, I have definitely concluded my V7R "little goose" is a keeper, I agree: one of the most joyful, balanced, soulful motorcycles available. Yet, I lust for a bit more power, hence the MV investigations.

Interesting comment on the Dragster seat. I am one to get out in front of the bike, off the seat in corners, when I do get to fast corners (about a 50 mile ride NW of Houston). Why have a sportbike if you can't engage the physics? Be Yvon Duhamel-- (by the way I am old enough to have taken a Ski-Doo racing clinic from Yvon in 1971 racing Blizzard, triple, two strokes). Hence is some of the triple fever.

Compact is good for me, the V7R is quite compact except the broad, flat, soft gel low seat is wonderful for long rides.

Yeah, I ask too many questions. But the MV bikes are not cheap, and buyers remorse is no fun. Age 60 does bring wisdom too.

Grazie!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Lucydad, based on your info I would venture a guess that the 800 B3 will be damn near perfect for you; just a matter of simple adjustment suspension-wise... Watch out -- if you ride one, you'll likely be coming home with it :)

As far as more power on the V7, off-topic as it may be: for the most part it is what it is and chasing more top end on these bike is fruitless. However, IF you lose some weight from the bike AND sort out the mapping to get rid of the torque dips as much as possible, it becomes a bike that punches nicely in its own weight class and possibly a bit above. Between the full 2-into-1 exhaust and an Antigravity battery, my bike lost close to 35lbs -- quite significant savings on a bike of such [low] power. The mapping was tweaked out to match and now the little thing just rips; gobs of torque...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
Try your best to get some serious seat time on the MV before you buy but if you can't and it's close... Buy it anyway. If it works, great! If it doesn't, sell it and spice up the Goose. See below.

What would you lose if you sold the MV? A couple of grand? If you haven't got a few grand to toss away, you probably shouldn't be thinking about a new bike in the first place.

The Guzzi may not make 300hp. So what? It's reliable, comfortable and easy to work on. It's a bike you ride and enjoy, not one you'll polish every weekend hoping someone will come along and tell you how cool it is. Remember, in Mike Baldwin's day that Guzzi was enough to win at Loudon. People TOURED the country for months on 60 hp bikes. (Actually, they still do. They're called Harleys.) You can make it a few hours with the V7. ;)

Lucydad, based on your info I would venture a guess that the 800 B3 will be damn near perfect for you; just a matter of simple adjustment suspension-wise... Watch out -- if you ride one, you'll likely be coming home with it :)

As far as more power on the V7, off-topic as it may be: for the most part it is what it is and chasing more top end on these bike is fruitless. However, IF you lose some weight from the bike AND sort out the mapping to get rid of the torque dips as much as possible, it becomes a bike that punches nicely in its own weight class and possibly a bit above. Between the full 2-into-1 exhaust and an Antigravity battery, my bike lost close to 35lbs -- quite significant savings on a bike of such [low] power. The mapping was tweaked out to match and now the little thing just rips; gobs of torque...
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top