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Discussion Starter #1
What's the big deal with radial mounted calipers? Seems to me that it doesn't matter which way they're mounted. Both methods mount the caliper as solidly as it can be so who cares. The down side to the radial mount, from what I see, is that it can't be shimmed to get perfect rotor/caliper alignment which is important.
 

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In the times of CAD design, there are no problems with rotor/caliper alignment. But you can use different rotors diameters in matter of minutes. Maybe it's easier to make radial calipers out of one piece?

For street riding it really doesn't make a difference.
 

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the calipers will not twist under hard braking you would normally see in racing. Standard mounted calipers will twist. You would probably never notice the difference under normal riding conditions
 

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Radial brakes

Radial fitment of calipers make changing rotor sizes for a race bike a matter of minutes.
Discs for wet conditions are a different diameter.
Changing diameter allows a team to fine tune the brakes to different riders and tracks.
 

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useless shit

Lee;
radial brakes are Brembo marketing BS
remember when the 4 piston axial Brembos had 2 pads per caliper?
then the went to 4 pad calipers.....with about 15% less pad area so they wear faster.....and you needed 2 sets of pads to do a brake job, cost twice as much because only 4 pads come in a kit......

then they went radial 4 pad, now back to 2 pad

and they all use the same fucking pistons:wtf::jerkoff::jerkoff::jerkoff:

the bolts are in shear whether axial or radial mounted:naughty: and like they need 10 mm bolts too

caliper twist at 300 PSI give me a break:wtf:

changing disc size for wet conditions......please:jerkoff:

just put an adjustable proportioning valve and turn a knob instead of wasting time changing discs and pads

http://www.mustangbrakeparts.com/prodimages/9422.gif

i even have one on my El Camino:naughty:

:f4::brutale:
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
When you say changing rotor size you mean diameter or thickness? Thickness is one thing but diameter would require moving the caliper in or out in order to maintain the contact patch between the rotor and pads.

Unless one is a serious, and I mean serious track freak, I think radial calipers have no advantage over axial. Other than bling bragging rights. Ditto the so called radial master cylinder.

10mm bolts are even more overkill than HD does and they're known for it. You couldn't shear one of those off if you shoved a pipe through the spokes at 100 mph.
 

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Radial callipers are much stronger than normal one's and not as prone to opening out under brake pressure, they allow more even pressure across the brake pad, just watch a set of normal callipers as you sqeeze the brake lever, you will be amazed hpw much they flex

When we raced early 911's (2.7RS) we had to machine the pistons in the calliper so as the calliper 'opened out' the piston would literally 'rock' on the back of the pad instead of applying unequal pressur and wearing the pads like a block of cheese
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't believe the radial mounting has anything to do with the caliper body itself flexing. Why the monobloc units are better than the split halves bolted together. Less flex.

You're right about the pistons bearing on the pad at different points under different braking pressures. Really raises hell with how much pad surface is actually compressing on the rotor. You can tell how bad it is by looking at the piston wear circles on the pad backing plates.

Nice trick cutting the pistons to rock. Tit!
 

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Radial calipers

changing disc size for wet conditions......please:jerkoff:

This is what I was told by a crew chief in Moto G.P. Quicker to swap discs for a different diameter, for whatever reason, with radial calipers.
Discs are often changed acccording to different tracks and rider preference.
They do look good, but my non radial set up is as good as I will ever need.
 

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I don't believe the radial mounting has anything to do with the caliper body itself flexing. Why the monobloc units are better than the split halves bolted together. Less flex.

You're right about the pistons bearing on the pad at different points under different braking pressures. Really raises hell with how much pad surface is actually compressing on the rotor. You can tell how bad it is by looking at the piston wear circles on the pad backing plates.

Nice trick cutting the pistons to rock. Tit!
Some car applications have one half or less of the piston machined lower than the other half, so only half the piston makes contact with the pad, there is usually a diagram of which way this must face in the workshop manual
 

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the diameter of the bolts?... 10mm
spacing between the holes?... 100mm

:f4::brutale:
 
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