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So, I had a conversation this afternoon with a very nice dude named Mark at the Duc Store in Marietta, GA. I told him I was in the market for a used 800 Brutale or an 800 Dragster (no RRs). He told me that he didn't have any and that they don't come in very often. Then he asked if I'd consider a new one? I said, yeah, if I robbed a bank. After a strong chuckle that made me kinda like him, he asked what my budget was and if I was planning on a cash purchase or financing? My budget is between $10 - 11K and I'm up in the air about if I'm going to finance it or not. He told me financing a used bike is going to cost me 6-7% on a typical 3 year finance. He can finance a new MV for 1.9% for 60 months. A 2019 Brutale he has in stock is $14,995.00. A quick calculation produced the following: $10k at 6% for 3 years makes my payments about $300 a month for a 4-5 year old bike. $15K at 1.9% for 60 months is about $260 a month for a brand spanking new bike. Then Mark slyly nailed the coffin shut - FOUR years, fender to fender, unlimited milage, warranty. So, brand new Brutale for $260 a month with a 4 year warranty, or a $10K, 5 year-old used bike, with no warranty that probably needs tires and an upcoming major service.
Is this too good to be true? Can any of you verify this? Comments? Advise?
 

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You have the math ..... do you qualify for the low interest loan?
Bear in mind....the used bike is 3 years financed...the new bike is 5.
So 24 more months of payments.

If I was financing I would go with the new bike just for the warranty etc.... can you make a significant down payment?

Mark is an honest guy, but he is also selling something.
 

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I would but the new one in heart bit!!
The old ones have many issues, the new ones are much more refined and reliable.
Trust me, I had a Brutale 800 that dropped valves at 28k and many many many issues, nightmare.
I own now a Dragster 2019....No issues at 5k, so far.
 

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300 x 36 = 10800
260 x 60 = 15600
I call that 50% more expensive
Ah....but factor in full warranty for 4 years and no need for $500+ in tires (not to mention maintenance) needed.

But yes....new will always be higher than used. Significant depreciation hits the minute you drive the new one home.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
300 x 36 = 10800
260 x 60 = 15600
I call that 50% more expensive
Of course its more expensive. But, monthly it's cheaper (all be it for 24 extra months - but, i'll probably sell it after 3 years and upgrade). I'm more attracted to not only the new factor and the lower payment, but also reliability and the money I'm not going to have immediately come out of pocket to buy tires and an impending major service, not to mention the gremlins that mature after five years. At the end of the day, I can't help thinking that the $10K bike is going to turn into $12 - 13K bike by the time It gets sorted. When you factor that, the price of both bikes seems to be rather close to just a couple grand. And, how much peace of mind can I factor in with a new bike? (I'm a decent mechanic, but a serious issue I can't handle or for which I don't have the required tools, means a 1.5 hour trip each way to the nearest dealer). Is that worth the immediate depreciation? You are 100% right tho, it's more expensive. I'm just trying to decide if it's worth it.
 

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Of course its more expensive.
But, monthly it's cheaper (all be it for 24 extra months - but, i'll probably sell it after 3 years and upgrade)
.
I'm more attracted to not only the new factor and the lower payment, but also reliability and the money I'm not going to have immediately come out of pocket to buy tires and an impending major service, not to mention the gremlins that mature after five years. At the end of the day, I can't help thinking that the $10K bike is going to turn into $12 - 13K bike by the time It gets sorted. When you factor that, the price of both bikes seems to be rather close to just a couple grand. And, how much peace of mind can I factor in with a new bike? (I'm a decent mechanic, but a serious issue I can't handle or for which I don't have the required tools, means a 1.5 hour trip each way to the nearest dealer). Is that worth the immediate depreciation? You are 100% right tho, it's more expensive. I'm just trying to decide if it's worth it.
Agree with buying new over someone else's problems...
My advice, pull some extra shifts and pay cash.
 

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Of course its more expensive. But, monthly it's cheaper (all be it for 24 extra months - but, i'll probably sell it after 3 years and upgrade). I'm more attracted to not only the new factor and the lower payment, but also reliability and the money I'm not going to have immediately come out of pocket to buy tires and an impending major service, not to mention the gremlins that mature after five years. At the end of the day, I can't help thinking that the $10K bike is going to turn into $12 - 13K bike by the time It gets sorted. When you factor that, the price of both bikes seems to be rather close to just a couple grand. And, how much peace of mind can I factor in with a new bike? (I'm a decent mechanic, but a serious issue I can't handle or for which I don't have the required tools, means a 1.5 hour trip each way to the nearest dealer). Is that worth the immediate depreciation? You are 100% right tho, it's more expensive. I'm just trying to decide if it's worth it.
You won't have anything to sell after three years as it's not yours yet by a long way.
I'm old fashioned, I never buy anything on finance. New bikes, or cars for that matter, have never been cheap. Depreciation is what makes them expensive. Just my opinion. Good luck and I hope you get what you want.
 

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You won't have anything to sell after three years as it's not yours yet by a long way.
I'm old fashioned, I never buy anything on finance. New bikes, or cars for that matter, have never been cheap. Depreciation is what makes them expensive. Just my opinion. Good luck and I hope you get what you want.
I'm not sure why you'd say that. After 3 years the new bike is still going to be worth 10 - 12K. I should have money left over after paying off the loan two years early. I'm old fashion too, but I use other people's money whenever prudent. If I pay cash, I'm buying the five year-old bike. The more I line up the two, I keep leaning toward the new bike. New bike, lower payments than a used one, fewer problems and a four-year warranty is how I think I can sell the deal to my CFO.
 

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Mate, the bike still cost 15600 between what you pay in the 3 years and the outstanding loan you pay off. You get your 10 or 12 back. That is a loss and not money left over.
I don't know if your deal is a good one for that bike, it may well be exceptionally good and I really wish you well and that you get what you want.
 

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I have bought new and I have bought used. Unless we're talking 'classics', I prefer new, for one reason as said above, 'to avoid other peoples problems' (not always the case, I agree) and secondly, because of the emotional high of having a brand new bike.

BUT, we do pay a lot for that 'emotional high' because of the instant 'out of the showroom' loss. On some bikes we will take a very big hit over the first 12 months. It's up to us to factor in whether we prefer the enjoyment of the bike or the enjoyment of the retained money. And therein lies your ( @JohnRomano ) answer.(y)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Agree with buying new over someone else's problems...
My advice, pull some extra shifts and pay cash.
Mate, the bike still cost 15600 between what you pay in the 3 years and the outstanding loan you pay off. You get your 10 or 12 back. That is a loss and not money left over.
I don't know if your deal is a good one for that bike, it may well be exceptionally good and I really wish you well and that you get what you want.
Now you have me thinking.....
Ok - assuming the new bike is $15,000. Financed at 1.9% interest over 60 months, the total cost of the bike, plus interest, is $15,735.00 at the end of the finance period.
If I finance 100% of that, my payments are $262.00 per month (as per the payment calculator). Assuming the finance company is taking all of its interest off the top (customary), my first three payments (2.8 actually) go to interest. Assuming I keep the bike for 36 months, the final 33 of them will be paying down the principle. 33x $262= $8,646.00 that I will have paid off the loan after three years. That leaves $6,354.00 left to pay off to satisfy the loan. Assuming I can get $10,000 for the bike after three years (I think that's being rather conservative considering the market trend I've been watching for well over a year for these bikes), I can satisfy the loan and I will have $3,646 left over: $10,000 - $6,354 = $3,646.00 (thats a pretty hard number considering anything that goes wrong will be covered by the warranty and I'm starting off with brand new tires). Unless I'm missing something, you just helped me make up my mind. Thank you for motivating me to pencil this out!!
 

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Be sure to confirm your insurance premium is the same between the two.
 
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I have bought new and I have bought used. Unless we're talking 'classics', I prefer new, for one reason as said above, 'to avoid other peoples problems' (not always the case, I agree) and secondly, because of the emotional high of having a brand new bike.

BUT, we do pay a lot for that 'emotional high' because of the instant 'out of the showroom' loss. On some bikes we will take a very big hit over the first 12 months. It's up to us to factor in whether we prefer the enjoyment of the bike or the enjoyment of the retained money. And therein lies your ( @JohnRomano ) answer.(y)
I like the way the new bike pencils out. I don't mind losing $5k over three years. That's worth it. And, in the example I penciled out below, after three years things work out pretty well. I know all this exists in a perfect world, but I still think my calculation was conservative. New bike it is!
 

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Now you have me thinking.....
Ok - assuming the new bike is $15,000. Financed at 1.9% interest over 60 months, the total cost of the bike, plus interest, is $15,735.00 at the end of the finance period.
If I finance 100% of that, my payments are $262.00 per month (as per the payment calculator). Assuming the finance company is taking all of its interest off the top (customary), my first three payments (2.8 actually) go to interest. Assuming I keep the bike for 36 months, the final 33 of them will be paying down the principle. 33x $262= $8,646.00 that I will have paid off the loan after three years. That leaves $6,354.00 left to pay off to satisfy the loan. Assuming I can get $10,000 for the bike after three years (I think that's being rather conservative considering the market trend I've been watching for well over a year for these bikes), I can satisfy the loan and I will have $3,646 left over: $10,000 - $6,354 = $3,646.00 (thats a pretty hard number considering anything that goes wrong will be covered by the warranty and I'm starting off with brand new tires). Unless I'm missing something, you just helped me make up my mind. Thank you for motivating me to pencil this out!!
You tell yourself that :LOL::ROFLMAO: . So you pay a total of 15735 for the bike. Then it's yours. You sell it for 10k and have 3646 left over. At that point you have no bike . So owning that bike for 3 years has cost you 8646 minus the 3646 you recoup. Owning that bike for 3 years cost you 5 K.
I can't explain it to you any better than that. You should go shopping with my wife. She spends money on stuff but it was on sale so she actually safes 💰
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
You tell yourself that :LOL::ROFLMAO: . So you pay a total of 15735 for the bike. Then it's yours. You sell it for 10k and have 3646 left over. At that point you have no bike . So owning that bike for 3 years has cost you 8646 minus the 3646 you recoup. Owning that bike for 3 years cost you 5 K.
I can't explain it to you any better than that. You should go shopping with my wife. She spends money on stuff but it was on sale so she actually safes 💰
And I agree that spending $5k over three years is worth it. Smiles ain't free!
Until someone pays me to ride a bike for three years, what's the alternative? What's the $10k used bike going to be worth after three years? probably around $5. Either way, it's a wash. I might as well buy new. Like I said, I thank you for helping me decide.
(your wife and my wife should go shopping together!! LOL)
 

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Just from recent experience with my 1090. Got it for a steal used and have put about half of what I saved back into it to get her running right. Get a new one with the warranty and enjoy your worry free rides. As you said smiles aren't free, also im in Dallas GA, so when you get it let's go drag Ed out and ride 😁
 
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Just from recent experience with my 1090. Got it for a steal used and have put about half of what I saved back into it to get her running right. Get a new one with the warranty and enjoy your worry free rides. As you said smiles aren't free, also im in Dallas GA, so when you get it let's go drag Ed out and ride 😁
Definitely ride! I'll keep you posted.
 

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Do the math and be sure you understand trade offs. Another issue: will your MV dealer survive and offer warranty work? Mine went poof 4 months after buying my Dragster RR. All in all cash is king. I never finance bikes or cars.
Good luck!
 
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