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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!
Ive recently bought a 2018 Brutale 800RR and love it!
Ive put the suspension settings to standard since I weigh like a normal sized italian (about 75kg).
I think that it is a really stiff ride as fast as there is just a small bump and I checked how much the frontforks has moved and it is only about 30-35mm of travel which feels really weird on a fork that should have 125mm of travel. Do you guys have any ideas because it doesnt feel like its just the settings when it is 90mm left until bottoming out!
 

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There are no "standard" settings. There's only where the factory left it to fit literally a whole world of different riders. Thats what the manual has in it, and certainly not meant to be left there forever.
Here are universal instructions to have a STARTING set-up that fits YOU, and they work for any motorcycle with adjustable suspension.

While doing this, just remember the whole point. All suspension is meant to suspend you and the motorcycle above road anomalies. The springs hold the weight, and the shock damping should allow the most movement it can, for the best ride. You want to hover in its zone of operation (not topping or bottoming out).

1) Pre-load/ Setting 'sag':
With a friend, pull against the kickstand to unload each end, one at a time. Measure how much fork shaft is showing in the front, and measure from a fixed point on the subframe to a fixed point on the swing arm. Now, kickstand up, sit your whole weight on it, bounce a little to settle it, and measure those same points again. Either you can find this static recommended figure in your manual or *you'll need to know how much suspension travel your bike has. The goal is to be at 1/3 of the total suspension travel when the bike is loaded how you ride it. Tailbag, gear, wife, whatever. Use the pre-load adjusters to get that height correct, front and rear. If your load changes you'll need to re-check sag.

2) Compression:
Put a zip tie around the fork leg in front, against the dust seal, just tight enough not to slip from shaking, but not cranked on either. Do the same to the shock shaft in the rear, zip tie on the shaft, against the shock body. Yes it's tight in there, inside the spring, the point is to see how much it moves. Heres where you set the dials to the manual as a not-gonna-kill-yourself settings. Go for a short ride, how you normally ride, on roads you normally travel (avoiding any weird anomalies like massive pot holes or speed bumps). You want the zip ties to be close to the bottom of travel. Warning: Don't assume the bottom of travel is the bottom of the fork leg, *thats the figure you got above. If the zip tie is bottomed out, increase compression and ride again until the zip ties hover just above the bottoming out measurement. If the zip tie hasn't moved much (your problem) decrease compression and go for a ride until it does the above. Faster speeds, bigger bumps, and heavier loads, will all need more compression. Keep the zip ties on it and a small flathead under the seat. It's a quick 1/4 turn adjustment when you make a stop for fuel or a soda on every ride.

3) Rebound:
Standing next to the bike, push on one end hard. Increase rebound until it compresses with your push, rebounds back up, and stays in place... then reduce the rebound until you see it has a little second bounce back down after you push on it. Now add just enough rebound adjustment again to barely get rid of that bounce. Rebound will need to be increased with heavier loads, and reduced for bumpier roads and higher speeds.

4) Balance:
Now push on the whole bike at once and check that it compresses down and rebounds up evenly. If not, start over, you missed something. If so, grab beer you stud. You are a suspension expert now;)

These are now 'your' settings for this bike, don't be afraid to continually make minor adjustments as your style and the roads change. It's no 'black art', but no one can do it for you. Performing these adjustments, in this order, on well maintained suspension will get you the best ride and the best handling for you, on your bike, on the roads you travel. The screws are there, it's free, why not?

Oversimplification warning! Yes, there are about a billion other technical details to discuss, not to mention the inevitable opinions. This is a good and proven path to get very close 馃憤
 

Wing Nut
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Welcome to the family @Pernu !!
Please introduce your self to us with a post in the "New Member" section.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There are no "standard" settings. There's only where the factory left it to fit literally a whole world of different riders. Thats what the manual has in it, and certainly not meant to be left there forever.
Here are universal instructions to have a STARTING set-up that fits YOU, and they work for any motorcycle with adjustable suspension.

While doing this, just remember the whole point. All suspension is meant to suspend you and the motorcycle above road anomalies. The springs hold the weight, and the shock damping should allow the most movement it can, for the best ride. You want to hover in its zone of operation (not topping or bottoming out).

1) Pre-load/ Setting 'sag':
With a friend, pull against the kickstand to unload each end, one at a time. Measure how much fork shaft is showing in the front, and measure from a fixed point on the subframe to a fixed point on the swing arm. Now, kickstand up, sit your whole weight on it, bounce a little to settle it, and measure those same points again. Either you can find this static recommended figure in your manual or *you'll need to know how much suspension travel your bike has. The goal is to be at 1/3 of the total suspension travel when the bike is loaded how you ride it. Tailbag, gear, wife, whatever. Use the pre-load adjusters to get that height correct, front and rear. If your load changes you'll need to re-check sag.

2) Compression:
Put a zip tie around the fork leg in front, against the dust seal, just tight enough not to slip from shaking, but not cranked on either. Do the same to the shock shaft in the rear, zip tie on the shaft, against the shock body. Yes it's tight in there, inside the spring, the point is to see how much it moves. Heres where you set the dials to the manual as a not-gonna-kill-yourself settings. Go for a short ride, how you normally ride, on roads you normally travel (avoiding any weird anomalies like massive pot holes or speed bumps). You want the zip ties to be close to the bottom of travel. Warning: Don't assume the bottom of travel is the bottom of the fork leg, *thats the figure you got above. If the zip tie is bottomed out, increase compression and ride again until the zip ties hover just above the bottoming out measurement. If the zip tie hasn't moved much (your problem) decrease compression and go for a ride until it does the above. Faster speeds, bigger bumps, and heavier loads, will all need more compression. Keep the zip ties on it and a small flathead under the seat. It's a quick 1/4 turn adjustment when you make a stop for fuel or a soda on every ride.

3) Rebound:
Standing next to the bike, push on one end hard. Increase rebound until it compresses with your push, rebounds back up, and stays in place... then reduce the rebound until you see it has a little second bounce back down after you push on it. Now add just enough rebound adjustment again to barely get rid of that bounce. Rebound will need to be increased with heavier loads, and reduced for bumpier roads and higher speeds.

4) Balance:
Now push on the whole bike at once and check that it compresses down and rebounds up evenly. If not, start over, you missed something. If so, grab beer you stud. You are a suspension expert now;)

These are now 'your' settings for this bike, don't be afraid to continually make minor adjustments as your style and the roads change. It's no 'black art', but no one can do it for you. Performing these adjustments, in this order, on well maintained suspension will get you the best ride and the best handling for you, on your bike, on the roads you travel. The screws are there, it's free, why not?

Oversimplification warning! Yes, there are about a billion other technical details to discuss, not to mention the inevitable opinions. This is a good and proven path to get very close 馃憤
Wow, thanks for that! The sag is set so Ill just start working on the settings then!
I hope Ill get a little bit more travel then! :)
 

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Note the setup instructions for an MV, in the Workshop Manual, are all from a Reference Tool and cannot be use by the "Loose Method" described above....

486096
 

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Yep, you have that right! The MV specific manual says to buy a $410.00USD+ship+sales tax "special tool" 馃槼REAR SUSPENSION SETTING ROD 8000C0962 Search by part number # MV AGUSTA - Online Genuine Spare Parts Catalog

to do this:
... measure from a fixed point on the subframe to a fixed point on the swing arm...
But
... The sag is set ...
so no need for him to wait for the Ever Given to deliver his use-one-time $500 stamped steel bracket. I'm sure the race team has one though... LOL.

Good luck Pernu, take notes so you can back track one step if you don't like a change. The adjustments on both my MV's had a large range of adjustment. Thats a good thing 馃憤 but when you get close, even a small 1/8 turn can make a difference.

Please post up your progress!
 

Super Moderator
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Well, if you have a linear suspension response to the change in frame geometry then you鈥檇 be set, but you don鈥檛.
Just remember, you can do things to your suspension set up that make riding downright dangerous.
What are you using for initial reference?
 

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Well, how do I know where the bottom of travel is then? :)
By bottoming the suspension:) It's very easy with the compression/rebound backed all the way off. Do it after a ride. Warm fork oil is also when you should be making all adjustments.

If you aren't heavy enough to bounce it down in the garage, try the end of your driveway? Slow will do it. Don't worry, they are built for way worse than that.
If you want factory sponsored cool guy race team precision 馃檮... pull the forks off, springs out, and measure the legs when compressed to their jounce bumpers. It will give you the same exact reading as above, for a lot more money and time. The MV way (TM)!

Alternatively, start with official sources like the service manual, tech support, or a local dealers shop manager. If no luck there, a fork rebuilder like Race-Tech would know. Remember MV didn't make the suspension, Marzocchi and Sachs did.
As a last resort you could YouTube, or a search a dedicated forum (like this awesome one). Maybe someone who is more familiar with MV specific suspension can chime in with that figure? or loan you a sweet aluminum bracket? 馃
 
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