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Good luck, hope it turns out how you want, but don't compromise safety and braking effectiveness for looks.

- measure mounting hole center distances and hole diameters to the stock holes. If it doesn't fit, it doesn't fit and you don't want excessive play on the mounting bolts either

- measure mount to disc center, mount to midpoint between pistons. This will give you the spacer thickness needed to line them up (spacers for the caliper or spacers for the disc brake, I don't advise either)

- measure distance from axle center line to rotor edge, axle center to the inside edge of the caliper. You won't want interference here and you'll want the maximum pad placement on the rotor friction surface.

- measure distance from mount to outer edge of caliper, mount to closest point on rim. You don't want it cutting into your rims and to leave some leeway in for the rim to wobble without hitting in the event the hub starts failing.

- fluid displacement required to move the pistons. If the new calipers pistons are larger and requires more fluid displacement to move the pads the same distance as the stock calipers, then the master cylinder may not provide sufficient pressure to properly engage the rear brakes (sounds like the stock arrangement :))

I personally don't advise modifications or spacers on braking systems. Lots of forces involved, lots of potential for catastrophic failure :jsm: Hopefully it just bolts together for you. What about painting/coating the stock Nissin? Is there a direct replacement available that meets your viewing preferences?

If you've got the skills or a friend that can fabricate a full mounting bracket to replace the stock unit in order to make the new caliper meet the required measurements and tolerances, out of suitable material of course, that would be your best action IMHO.

If anyone sees anything I may have missed, feel free to :eek:nthecan: on me :lightning
 

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Good luck, hope it turns out how you want, but don't compromise safety and braking effectiveness for looks.......

- fluid displacement required to move the pistons. If the new calipers pistons are larger and requires more fluid displacement to move the pads the same distance as the stock calipers, then the master cylinder may not provide sufficient pressure to properly engage the rear brakes (sounds like the stock arrangement
let me save you some time.......the stock Nissens have a lopsided bolt pattern more than likely new mount time.....ask Andrew :naughty:

Reckler;
you have it backwards, larger caliper pistons provide MORE pressure but require more pedal travel F=AxP
 

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That was my point Noel, since the master cylinder might only move enough fluid to push the smaller pistons a certain distance (enough for stock brakes to engage), the same master cylinder may not move the larger pistons the same amount, providing less force. With addequate fluid displacement, the larger cyclinders would for sure provide more braking force.

With you 100%.
 
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