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Anyone have any special advice, what to be careful of etc, on how to do a brake fluid and clutch fluid change?
use DOT 4

remove calipers, slave and push pistons back in, remount

syphon and wipe the reservoirs clean, refill with new DOT4

bleed until you get clean fluid

:drummer::drummer:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have no idea what is in the system atm, but I was told by Peter Stevens staff that I should be using 5.1. I understand that I should just keep filling the reservoirs until only the new stuff exits the bleed screws right?
 

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Old Wing Nut
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5.1 is ok with 4.....do NOT use 5. Actually, 4 will work perfectly, last longer than 5.1 and cost less.....unless you are racing, then go for the higher temp stuff. Your bike came with 4.

Noel's method will result in faster and easier bleeding with less chance to mix old and new fluid.....using less fluid, too.

Keep clean water handy and wash up or wipe off any spills quickly!
 

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I use DOT 4 period......

cleanup with a water/alcohol mix ~ 30% alcohol works great

you can cheat a bit and use C clamps on the calipers(or wedges) and

slave

if you saw me fill and bleed a new system.......you'd go WTF...... I don't

use the bleed fittings at all

:naughty::naughty::naughty:

except on the retarded POS Brembo radial M/Cs

:popcorn:
 

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Mark;

the idea is to reduce the volume of old fluid in the system by pushing the

pistons back and holding them there while bleeding after draining the M/C

and refilling with new

:popcorn:
 

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I drape a damp cloth over the vulnerable areas of the bike.
Remove the reservoir cap and bleed the fronts from the furthest away caliper first. I normally drain the res to a low level first.
I dont mind shoving fluid through around the pistons particularly to force out moisture that may have condensed throughout.
Do 5.1 has a higher boiling point but has a greater affinity for moisture .
I change my fluid each year on all my bikes. Fluid is cheap works much better than water and brake parts are expensive...
joe
 

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Mark;

the idea is to reduce the volume of old fluid in the system by pushing the

pistons back and holding them there while bleeding after draining the M/C

and refilling with new

:popcorn:
Regardless of whether you push your pistons in or not,when the system returns to its "on the bike" state, the volume of fluid used will be the same. The pistons have to push out to the discs and the slave has to regain enough fluid to push the rod to disengage the clutch.

There is a possibility of introducing air, not that you, Noel, would do that due to your experience, as the reservoir level drops refilling the system.

I prefer to bleed the system in stasis using a vacuum bleeder at the actuated end of the system. Not everyone has that capability, though.

There are many ways to skin this cat.:smoking:
 

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Yep lots of methods. Mines a length of clear tube with a non return valve in the end ..cost me a fiver in 1903...The important thing is to do it.
 

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That guy is a dolt. Vacuum is not measured in "pressure" he is not "building up pressure"....he is creating "inches of vacuum". DERP.:ahhh:

And we collectively wonder why our bikes are not given back to us in decent condition when others work on them.:smoking:
 

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I know the guy in the video was using the wrong 'terms' when describing the process he was performing...., however 'what' he performed was correct!.

In any case each to his own..., and this is tool works perfectly for me ....., every time.
Others are more than happy to 'pump the brake lever'...., whatever works for you is the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks, I understand the principle! I note the manual says it is not necessary to remove the calipers if you have the tool to separate the pads on the 2007 model But it does say it is necessary to remove and refit the right clip on whilst activating the brake lever...???
 

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Regardless of whether you push your pistons in or not,when the system returns to its "on the bike" state, the volume of fluid used will be the same. The pistons have to push out to the discs and the slave has to regain enough fluid to push the rod to disengage the clutch.
No,
if you push the pistons back and hold them there is a minimum of dirty fluid in the system to flush......until you get clean fluid

then remount calipers/slave check fluid level and pump the system with the lever.......

if you can run the reservoir dry while looking at it.........take the bike to the dealer


:popcorn:
 

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Old Wing Nut
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Thanks, I understand the principle! I note the manual says it is not necessary to remove the calipers if you have the tool to separate the pads on the 2007 model But it does say it is necessary to remove and refit the right clip on whilst activating the brake lever...???
That is to ensure the master cylinder juncture to the brake hose is not higher than the fluid port in the master cylinder bore.

Lots of ways to "correctly" flush and bleed hydraulics.
I like Noel's method since you minimize old fluid in the system at the outset. I have a mitivac....works OK. Also have a vacuum system using air pressure at 90 or higher psi....works REALLY well.

But if I am using expensive high end fluid instead of AutoZone basic economy (yes, Virginia, there IS a difference in brake fluids even though they may all have the same "DOT rating"), then I go the hand route, and Noel's method. Less waste.
:conveyer:
 
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