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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question for the collective. I have a new to me 2016 TVL that is in desperate need of having the rear brake bled as in no rear brake. Of course my effort to use the traditional pump and bleed did not accomplish much. It did get the rear brake to register but only at the bottom of the arc. I see that there is a TSB on the brake bleeding procedure for the ABS unit and getting ready to have at it but thought I would check in first to see if there is an easier alternative. If not, it looks like from the parts fiche that the nose and right side fairing need to come off. Anything special to pay attention to in stripping down the plastic. If there is a sequence to it, I would appreciate any pointers.

I have the wheel nut tool on order which should make the bleeding part a little easier with the wheel/tire out of the way. The TSB says the rear brake is a two man job to bleed the ABS. Not sure why as it seems the ABS Unit should be in reach with the body work off but not having any experience with the TVL don't want to jump to any conclusions. If another member has been down this brake bleeding path, I would truly appreciate any guidance.
 

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Question for the collective. I have a new to me 2016 TVL that is in desperate need of having the rear brake bled as in no rear brake. Of course my effort to use the traditional pump and bleed did not accomplish much. It did get the rear brake to register but only at the bottom of the arc. I see that there is a TSB on the brake bleeding procedure for the ABS unit and getting ready to have at it but thought I would check in first to see if there is an easier alternative. If not, it looks like from the parts fiche that the nose and right side fairing need to come off. Anything special to pay attention to in stripping down the plastic. If there is a sequence to it, I would appreciate any pointers.

I have the wheel nut tool on order which should make the bleeding part a little easier with the wheel/tire out of the way. The TSB says the rear brake is a two man job to bleed the ABS. Not sure why as it seems the ABS Unit should be in reach with the body work off but not having any experience with the TVL don't want to jump to any conclusions. If another member has been down this brake bleeding path, I would truly appreciate any guidance.

Just one suggestion before considering bleeding as per my own experience : move the lever upper, the lower position makes you may apply less pressure than needed to brake. I changed the lever by CNC Racing Pro set with excentric foldable toe peg, and the excentric gave me one additional centimeter to set the lever properly, and I then discovered the rear brake...
 

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Just one suggestion before considering bleeding as per my own experience : move the lever upper, the lower position makes you may apply less pressure than needed to brake. I changed the lever by CNC Racing Pro set with excentric foldable toe peg, and the excentric gave me one additional centimeter to set the lever properly, and I then discovered the rear brake...
Agree with raising the pedal height.
I'm going to look into the CNC parts.
YIKES! $300 US too rich for me...
 

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UPDATE!

Bled the TV's rear brake today, resulting in much improved (maybe normal) pedal travel and feel.
First I bled master cylinder at the banjo bolt. No change in pedal travel or feel.

On to the ABS modulator, after removing the front side panels, storage compartments, fairing, gauge module and headlight.
I bled the pipe from the master cylinder to the ABS modulator 5 times at the banjo fitting.
Yes this makes a mess, but is unavoidable; have plenty of paper towels or pigmat in place before bleeding.

Success!
Pedal travel from at rest until it won't move is about an inch. Before bleeding it was over 2 inches, the rear brake did work and I could provoke ABS intervention. But there was no feel and I had to move the heal of my boot to the foot peg in order to push the pedal down.

NOTE:
The rear caliper did not need bleeding.
As the problem (air) was at the modulator rear inlet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Teeps:

Thanks for the update. Your timing couldn't be better. I got some fresh Motul RBF 600, the rear wheel socket and a torque wrench [didn't have anything that goes to 220NM] and will give it a go this weekend.

Props to Bumpkin - lifted his write-up on stripping down the front of the bike and put it here as well just in case someone else runs into the rear brake disappearing.


BUMPKIN's write-up below see post #10 here http://www.mvagusta.net/forum/74-turismo-veloce/183745-headlight-dim-bright-upgrade.html

Had to remove my nose-cone over the weekend so now have hands-on experience of this task as opposed to being a bystander whilst others do the work. Watching Jamie and Sam, at Ed Coskers, do it gave me some insight which helped greatly.

The main parts that you will need to remove are, in order:

1/ left and right fairing infills (the ones with the small stowage pockets) - in each; four 4mm done head Allen bolts, rear one through fairing into well nut in infill. Beware the inner one to the front, one slip and it'll fall into the channel right next to it and disappear. Access is tight so this is a distinct possibility. Extracting one from in there is hard, don't ask me why... Only consolation is that Sam did exactly the same thing last week. Once the four small bolts are out slide the edge of the infill inwards and forwards to disengage it from the fairing and the infill to the front side of the tank. Repeat on other side of the bike.

2/ left and right fairing outer side panels - removed the row of three 4mm dome head Allen bolts from the side of the fairing. The front one is difficult to access unless you have a very long Allen key or a screw driver type tool with the correct bit (I have one of the latter, Aldi special, perfect for this job). There is another 4mm bolt accessed from underneath toward the front between the fairing outer side panel and the radiator cover/inner side panel (B). The outer side panels are, once you've removed the above, retained by two rubber grommets that engage with pegs. One at the rear top attaching to the side of the fuel tank, the other at the bottom beside the bottom of the radiator. Be especially careful removing the panel on the right hand side, the Bluetooth module is mounted on the inner face and will need to be unplugged to allow complete removal. There is enough cable slack to allow for this but not much..

3/ nose-cone - remove the two screws from the black plastic part to the lower front of the nose-cone that attach to the top of the radiator cover/inner side panel (E). Inside the fairing, either side of the dash there is an Allen bolt going though the cast bracket that the dash is mounted to, these need to be removed taking great care not to slip and scratch the display (D). Remove the 4mm Allen bolts from inside the very top of the nose cone (C). There are cables connected to the nose-cone assembly, these run under the black plastic inner mid panel (16), on the left side, to their respective components (air temp sensor and, on the Lusso, the GPS antenna). The connectors for these are small but fairly easy to undo, they are under the left infill piece with the pocket. Finally remove the Allen bolt that's directly under the headlight (A), you'll need to get down low to see this, it's right underneath. I found it best, at this stage, to raise the screen to its highest position. Now, standing in front of the bike, straddling the front wheel, ease the upper sides of the nose-cone around the screen and its surround whilst pulling the whole assembly towards you and off the bike.



Assembly is reverse of the above.

With the exception of the Allen bolt under the headlight (A) and unplugging cables everything above needs to carried out on both sides of the bike, i.e. it's symmetrical. I've described, and annotated in the schematic, one side only.

I found that quite a few of the 4mm bolts that tightened onto the fairing were missing the little nylon washers that help protect the paintwork. I bought some off eBay, marginally thicker and slightly bigger outside diameter but they work well.

I also found that the 4mm bolts that screwed into rubber well-nuts were the longer of the two, the shorter ones screwed into threaded clips. Makes perfect sense but consider this on reassembly so that all fasteners have enough thread available to do up. Be very careful to get this right, using the shorter ones, on the screws at (E), both sides, 4 in all, accidentally use the long ones for these and you'll probably scratch your fork legs when the bars are turned.

The screws into well-nuts do a good job of holding themselves, don't over tighten these. The others don't need to be too tight but you can feel these, into threaded clips, 'nip up' easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Teeps

Thanks for checking.

Ran into some family issues. Our parrot Inca, she'll be 29 this year, got some kind of strange infection that attacked her liver. We are trying to sort out with her Vet what we can do. So, the rear brake is on the back burner for a while.
 

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Update to my last update.
After a few rides the rear brake seemed to be full of air again.
This time I bled the rear brake per the MV service bulletin.
The rear brake is, at this time, fully functional and the pedal travel is less than 1" now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Teeps - bleeding the ABS unit was messy as you pointed out but did make a difference. I ran out of time and havn't as yet re-positoned the rear lever. Once the lever is re-positioned I think all will be good.

Is there a trick to the clip on the rear brake piston? I couldn't get a good look at it the wheel on. I know someone mentioned it only took a couple of minutes to re-positon once they got past the clip.
 

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Teeps - bleeding the ABS unit was messy as you pointed out but did make a difference. I ran out of time and havn't as yet re-positoned the rear lever. Once the lever is re-positioned I think all will be good.

Is there a trick to the clip on the rear brake piston? I couldn't get a good look at it the wheel on. I know someone mentioned it only took a couple of minutes to re-positon once they got past the clip.
Here is what I wrote in the other thread.
However, I recommend bleeding the caliper, per the service bulletin, too.

No disassembly is needed, took about 5 minutes after I figured out how free the clevis pin.

The clevis pin has a spring clip that clips onto the clevis and secures it in place.
First loosen the nut.
Then move the clip toward the rear of the bike to release its grip on the clevis, then slide the peg out.
Turn the clevis clockwise to raise the pedal.

see item #25
https://www.bike-parts-mv.com/mvagu.../TURISMO_VELOCE_800/RIGHT-FOOTREST/60/11/0/68
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Teeps - the clip moved easy with your guidance. Actually it's pretty clever on MV's part the way it connects. The rear brake works much better, still not great but certainly good enough.

Just in case anyone else is going down this road the photo shows how the clip drops down once pressed away from the plunger shaft.

[/URL][/IMG][/IMG]
 

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Guys

So noticed my rear brake was feeling squishy. So figured maybe needed to bleed it. So went to my mv mechanic today and we bleed the rear dint see any air bubbles.

Took her for a spin and sno change at all. He thinks could be air in the ABS system which he mentioned you cant bleed and have to replace it.

Does this sound right?
 

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Bull shit....you do not have to replace the ABS unit if it has air in it. Find another technician, this one does not know what he is doing.

If you only bled the brake at the caliper then you probably haven't actually bled it yet.
 

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Bull shit....you do not have to replace the ABS unit if it has air in it. Find anther technician, this one does not know what he is doing.

If you only bled the brake at the caliper then you probably haven't actually bled it yet.
Also what i thought and ive just sent him the bulletin.

Lets see what he replies with.
 

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100% wrong as said above. I've blead mine and if you can't blead them how do they fit the replacement? They don't come filled with brake fluid and dry break couplings.
 

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Are you referring to the service bulletin on the procedure to bleed the rear brake? I had on going rear brake issues until my shop did it the way the service bulletin suggested and used high temp (racing) brake fluid. Since then the rear break has been solid.

Bull shit....you do not have to replace the ABS unit if it has air in it. Find anther technician, this one does not know what he is doing.

If you only bled the brake at the caliper then you probably haven't actually bled it yet.
Also what i thought and ive just sent him the bulletin.

Lets see what he replies with.
 

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For those of you that have bled the system per the service bulletin, did it resolve the problem permanently? My dealership has bled mine twice per the service bulletin and has only resulted in a temporary fix before the problem reappears.

Wondering if the problem may be something other than the system bleeding or if the tech isn't doing the process correctly on my bike?
 

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For those of you that have bled the system per the service bulletin, did it resolve the problem permanently? My dealership has bled mine twice per the service bulletin and has only resulted in a temporary fix before the problem reappears.

Wondering if the problem may be something other than the system bleeding or if the tech isn't doing the process correctly on my bike?
Unless you sat and watched the tech perform the bulletin bleeding; I'd say from your description (above) he's not, 'cause it's a pain in the butt.
The head light assembly must be removed to access the ABS unit. That is a job in and of itself.
Couple that with removal of the rear caliper to bleed it. You have over an hour invested.
Then the bulletin says ride the bike and activate the ABS, then repeat the bleed procedure.

The most recent time I bled the rear brake on my TV. I followed the bulletin; but did not do the test ride, then repeat bleeding.
This was a about 500 miles ago. So far the pedal has stayed high and firm.
 

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My problem seems to occur every spring after winter storage. The mileage between rear brake issues and the dealer bleeding the system has been much more than 500 miles.. maybe 2500 to 4000.
 
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