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I'm going to be honest and ask if I'm the first one not to understand this question?
 

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My guess is we are talking about the clutch???? In which case it is wet...
Naaaahhh He'll be asking about cylinder bores.
I think it will be neither , most modern ally bike engines don't have a liner of sorts they instead run a coated aluminum bore for weight savings, which means the only way you can do an over bore is have them machined out a dry liner pressed in .
Although MV's may be different???? but i doubt it, the cylinders are made by Mahle .
 

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Cylinders that are electro chemical coated can be re bored but have to be re coated after, if the cylinder walls are thick enough not to break into the water jacket. No liners pressed in. The MV engine being very narrow would not have room for a liner. Engines with a liner can be bored out oversize without changing the liner, within the limits.
Production costs and weight are why chemical coating is used.
Thats my understanding at least.
 

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The technical name is call Nikasil. The problem in the past with Nikasil plated engines is that due to the high sulfur content in lower grade fuels, the sulfur attacks the plating and strips the coating.

If you use high quality fuels with no sulfur content the engine lining should be fine. Jaguar V8 engines had alot of problems due to Nikasil coating being eaten away by sulfur. Nothing much you can do except a new motor...Read $$$$
 

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This all sounds familiar from when I had a Porsche engine rebuilt about 10 years ago.
 

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Multiple types of plating are now in use for cylinders. Superior heat transfer and light weight are the primary benefits over a steel liner.

Old race engines used a chromium plated bore (my Yamaha racer had chrome bores). Nikasil (developed by Kawasaki if I recall in the late 70's) is one type now used, but there are several others. Most manufacturers now have their own proprietary material.

But to the original question.....the cylinder bores are surrounded by water jackets...making them effectively "wet liners".

Of course, only the upper half of each bore is "wet", with an open deck allowing water passages to mate with the cylinder head passages. Primary heat transfer from the piston crown to the cylinder is via the rings, so only that part of the bore that the rings run in is water cooled. Oil cools the piston skirts. Also very important is the water flow through the head to remove heat from the valve seats.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All good responses gentlemen. Thank you.

The question was too ambiguous to declare a first-to-answer winner... my apologies, it's all in fun anyway.

But the questioned I was wondering did get answered; unlined, coated cylinder, surrounded by coolant (not siamese?).

PTWA (Plasma Transferred Wire Arc) is a relative new high tech process for cylinder coating, does anyone have knowledge of it being used in the motorcycle industry? MV Agusta maybe?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ohh come on thats not fair.... I call foul.
:bandit:
Yeah I thought about giving it to you but your answer really didn't answer my question...too general...course this is a 'general talk' thread...hummm...esq'z me had a more definitive answer...but although his was more to the point you responded first...hummmmm...and you were right on target when you said it was in regards to cylinders...hummmmmmmmmm...Okay, you were close enough. OUTBACKBIKER THAAA WINNER!!!!!! (DING! DING! DING!):)
 

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Jerry,
Suzuki uses what they call "Suzuki Composite Electrochemical Material" to plate their cylinders....it is an electrically vaporized wire deposited on the bore....sounds like what you are asking about.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Jerry,
Suzuki uses what they call "Suzuki Composite Electrochemical Material" to plate their cylinders....it is an electrically vaporized wire deposited on the bore....sounds like what you are asking about.
Thanks Ed, I'll check that out.
 

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Yeah I thought about giving it to you but your answer really didn't answer my question...too general...course this is a 'general talk' thread...hummm...esq'z me had a more definitive answer...but although his was more to the point you responded first...hummmmm...and you were right on target when you said it was in regards to cylinders...hummmmmmmmmm...Okay, you were close enough. OUTBACKBIKER THAAA WINNER!!!!!! (DING! DING! DING!):)
Well thank you my dear sir... I appreciate your deliberation!!!
Now what the bloody hell have I won:yo:.
A poke in the eye with a Burnt stick ?????:stickpoke:jsm:
 

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But to the original question.....the cylinder bores are surrounded by water jackets...making them effectively "wet liners".
This is kinda dangerous here.......Like give Michaelangelo painting tips, but here goes........

Ed: I think you're wrong. :jsm: Since the MV does not have cylinder liners of any sort, the answer is neither. Yes? Further, my understanding of wet vs. dry liners is whether the cylinder liner is inserted into the block in such a manner that the inside of the liner is exposed to the antifreeze directly, versus indirectly thru the block. A dry liner is completely inserted into a cylinder bore whereas a wet liner is inserted into the block and becomes part of the water jacket in itself.

Am I right? (If I'm right, do I get a cookie?)
 

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I think you are right on the wet vs dry !!!:yo: I dont know about the cookie though !!

This is kinda dangerous here.......Like give Michaelangelo painting tips, but here goes........

Ed: I think you're wrong. :jsm: Since the MV does not have cylinder liners of any sort, the answer is neither. Yes? Further, my understanding of wet vs. dry liners is whether the cylinder liner is inserted into the block in such a manner that the inside of the liner is exposed to the antifreeze directly, versus indirectly thru the block. A dry liner is completely inserted into a cylinder bore whereas a wet liner is inserted into the block and becomes part of the water jacket in itself.

Am I right? (If I'm right, do I get a cookie?)
 

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Since there is no liner inserted into the block, but rather the block itself bored and plated, the water is in effect directly against the "liner". My original statement:

the cylinder bores are surrounded by water jackets...making them effectively "wet liners"

I stand by that....effectively being the operative word.
 

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Since there is no liner inserted into the block, but rather the block itself bored and plated, the water is in effect directly against the "liner". My original statement:

the cylinder bores are surrounded by water jackets...making them effectively "wet liners"

I stand by that....effectively being the operative word.
Then, what is your definition of a 'dry liner'? I'm confused, but what's new with that?
 
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