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Discussion Starter #1
:confused: Hi i am a new member and i want some advice.I have not owned a bike for 20 years and now i am bying F4 1000R. I am 42 years old and the only experience i have have on 2 weels last 20 years is cycling races on pretty god level. I am been dreaming about mv-agusta F4 for many years and now i feel it is time for me to stop dreaming and go for it innstead. Am i way over my head or not? I have been a guest on this great forum for about a years time and this is THE place to get some god strait anwsers.
 

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I would recommend (in fact, I would say YOU BETTER) getting a beater to get yourself up to speed. The F4 1000 R although beautiful, is a very powerful beast. Not only that, but the idea of dropping one would certainly make me want to pull out my eyes.

Congrats, though on following up on your dream. Wear full gear, but practice, practice practice...
 

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Since 3 weeks, I own a F4-1000R. It's a very powerfull bike. But you only go as fast as you want it to.

So my advice: be gentle at the beginning. GEt used to the bike and build up speed.

Good luck with it. I'm sure you'll enjoy it.


GreetZ
 

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MV, welcome to the site. You will find plenty of info and make friends while your at it. Glad to see you're in the market for a bike. Whatever you decide to do, be safe and smart about it. Enjoy.
 

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Peet said:
Since 3 weeks, I own a F4-1000R. It's a very powerfull bike. But you only go as fast as you want it to.
I don't get the remarks of some people saying the bike is too fast, Peet you are spot on, it only goes as fast as you want it too.

On the other hand as Admin said there is a risk for the inexperienced to drop them. The most likely time to drop a bike (in my personal experience) is
- when you are parking it (watch where the stand goes).
- when stopping in traffic like at traffic lights, (look for slipery surfaces where you foot will rest).
- when manouvering.

Glad I had a cheaper bike first (which I dropped like 4 times, never while moving though :( :guitarist )

I say go for it, but it is a great comment from Flaming about hiring a bike for a while first.

Jonathan
 

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spacechumper said:
I don't get the remarks of some people saying the bike is too fast, Peet you are spot on, it only goes as fast as you want it too.
While I agree the rider controls the throttle, the bike is very powerful and a lot easier to get into trouble (make a mistake) with so much power. So you have to understand that it can and will bite.

We all understand the lust for it. It can be done but you must respect the power and ride accordingly.
 

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Summary....

Beater bike to practice and reaquaint your self on....if not, then fine, at 42 you are most likely to be mature enough to use the throttle both directions.

Track school...not neccesarily to be the "fastest" guy on the block, but to learn the mechanics of speed and how to use the bike....I always felt that a "faster" (not squids, yall know what im talking about) rider is generally a safer rider as he is more aware and has respect of the bikes capabilities.

Gear, Gear, gear.....I've never heard anyone say they prefer hospital beds over hot leathers.

Good Life Insurance Policy....Bikes are dangerous, if you have family, then you have certain responsibilities that are also to be considered.

and last, but not least....

a healthy reserve of cash for all the carbon fiber and titanium you will be lusting for the new F4.
 

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Well done mate best thing you'll have ever done. I was away from biking for thirty years. Over here in the uk most biker schools do a back to biking course, i did this and learnt so much in four days of riding and having feedback from the instructor. Jumped straight on a blackbird and felt well good. Then after two years the F4 1000 so much better than the blackbird. All i can say is every one on here is right they can bight back and the MV is crap in confined spaces but i'm getting on ok.
 

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Gladio said:
While I agree the rider controls the throttle, the bike is very powerful and a lot easier to get into trouble (make a mistake) with so much power. So you have to understand that it can and will bite.

We all understand the lust for it. It can be done but you must respect the power and ride accordingly.
GLADIO!!!!
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Welcome, MV-Serotta... Serottas are beautiful bikes!!! a friend of mine has 2 of their bikes... I personally ride a Seven and a Merlin.

I agree with others, obviously be gentle with the right wrist and take it easy on the bike, first just get used to riding it, handling it, dealing with it, get really comfortable with it first; although you have been a road cycling racer, the bulk and the weight(30X of your Serotta!) of the motorcycle is something that will take time to get used to.

On the other hand as Admin said there is a risk for the inexperienced to drop them. The most likely time to drop a bike (in my personal experience) is
- when you are parking it (watch where the stand goes).
- when stopping in traffic like at traffic lights, (look for slipery surfaces where you foot will rest).
- when manouvering.
I agree with Space... conciously work on your bike handling skill first, and by that I don't mean cornering skill, I mean things like: pushing the bike around, how to deal with the bike on slopes, where best to park, etc... there is nothing more painful to see a new bike tilt over just that little bit too mch and then BOOOOM!!!!! especially on an exotic beauty like the F4 1000R! and remember, with its weight, not only the bike will be damamged, anything in its way including you can be seriously damaged too!

one thing to add to the list of where to be careful not to drop the bike is be aware of the road surface gradient specifically where you are, the area where the street the curb/sidewalk meet generally are sloped for drainage, I don't know how tall you are, but if you are stopped in a spot where your legs have a longer reach to the ground, that will causes the bike to lean... i.e. coming out of a driveway and stopped with the the front wheel on the road and rear wheel on the drive way's down slope; or when pulling over to the side near the edge of the road where it is sloped down... BE AWARE! just a few extra degrees of lean will cause the bike crashing down.

When I first got the R6(my first bike), in order to "get comfortable" with the bike, I went out for rides in the late evenings (10,11pm) for 1-2 hours, almost everyday for the first month or so, I think it's a great time to do it because there are less cars, less pressure to make mistakes.

Then when you are comfortable living with it, go to school and push your personal limit in a safe enviroment.


good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks evrybody. I feel a bit more comfy about what i should do.In Norway where i live i have heard there only 1 driving school,and they only have a couple of courses every season. I was planing too take course next season. I am not hot headed man and i know that a f41000r is a beast. i have to take easy this season.Thanks again.PS i have 2 serottas too.
 

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Welcome serotta :)

I don't think you're crazy or stupid.
I think you're just passing your mid-life crisis :D

I say, get an old beater bike first and ride it for a couple of months just to get used to riding again.

do as lewdog998 said
"Summary....

Beater bike to practice and reaquaint your self on....if not, then fine, at 42 you are most likely to be mature enough to use the throttle both directions.

Track school...not neccesarily to be the "fastest" guy on the block, but to learn the mechanics of speed and how to use the bike....I always felt that a "faster" (not squids, yall know what im talking about) rider is generally a safer rider as he is more aware and has respect of the bikes capabilities.

Gear, Gear, gear.....I've never heard anyone say they prefer hospital beds over hot leathers.

Good Life Insurance Policy....Bikes are dangerous, if you have family, then you have certain responsibilities that are also to be considered.

and last, but not least....

a healthy reserve of cash for all the carbon fiber and titanium you will be lusting for the new F4
."


The best of luck and keep us posted ;)
 

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Like Odonata said practise manovering the bike.

spacechumper said:
The most likely time to drop a bike (in my personal experience) is
- when you are parking it (watch where the stand goes).
- when stopping in traffic like at traffic lights, (look for slipery surfaces where you foot will rest).
- when manouvering.
I forgot some others.

- Try not to park your bike facing downhill too much, it could roll, and the stand will come up.
- Make sure you park it in gear.
- Careful manouvering them on steep driveways.
- Stopping at an intersection that is slopping, my street is steep and meets another road, once I came up to this intersection and saw car at the last moment. Went to put my foot down and couldn't reach. Luckly I was quick witted and there were no other cars, I quickly pointed the bike downhill near the gutter (sorta beside the oncomming car, damn close :eek: )

Remember once they start to fall they are hard to stop, in that case I sacrifice myself by being under it :guitarist

I did 50,000kms on my old bike, never looked like dropping it while riding (and never did), but I dropped it manouvering (few times) some too embarassing to tell about :drummer: .

In that sense i'm glad i had a crappy bike to hone my skills. :)

Jonathan
 
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