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Last thursday another biker pal was killed by a driver pulling out by all accounts he had no chance to avoid the car according to two other bikers that were with him and witnessed it.

The rider had a lot of experience and when I rode with him he was safe and courteous .

This is the second of my biker pals to go in the past year through no fault accidents and both have left families with all the problems they now face without him I now consider it is becoming too dangerous now to ride out safely in the UK.

The constant near misses and road rage from some are getting out of hand and as for driving using a phone or following a car reaking of cannabis it's beyond a joke now

I rarely go out during normal hours I now go very early in the morning and get home before the rabble get out.

So I am considering shifting all my bikes and concentrating on staying alive.

It is a sad time for me as I love my MV .

I could sit and polish for the rest of my life though!
 

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I am sorry for the loss of your friend. I know the feeling, and have also lost friends or had them seriously injured in the same manner.
However

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I know how you feel. I have recently sold my 3 bikes and I also understand Ed's sentiment. The problem with what Ed said is you cannot control what the cage drivers do. The constant use of phones while they are driving is causing more and more accidents. If you get rear ended while in a car or truck there is little chance of getting killed but if it happens while you are on a bike you will die.

I love riding and will miss my long trips, but it is a lot safer in a nice convertible.
 

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I feel for you but please take sometime to recover from your loss. It’s terrible. Let your motos rest, take a rest, regroup and at a later date take a spin on a calm day. —Your MV will understand, loving you back even more.
 

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sorry for your loss @AgustaRod .
i transformed my mv last year into a "track only" bike, with the intention of buying something for the road soon after. i have to say, 2 years on, i haven't bought anything and am not missing road riding all that much (and feel so much safer on the track and high speed). am doing roughly 15 track days per season which keeps me plenty happy (enjoying the bike for it's intended design etc). hope you recover soon from this tragedy.
 

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Whatever you do choose will be the right decision for you.
So sad. Motorcycles are dangerous. Every single time I go out now I take a minute or two and actually think about the dangers and to try and temper my mentality for safety , which is not easy for me.

In the last week, two car drivers have pulled out in front of me at a junction. I had eyeballs on them at both times, had slowed down as I am now trained to expect the worst. I was inches from one. I was on my bicycle!!
What this did was remind me that we HAVE to expect drivers to make mistakes. We are responsible for ourselves. Yes, drivers are to blame but drivers are human and make mistakes so it is actually on us, as individials, to look after ourselves.

Very difficult to be a biker these days. The roads are shite and there are too many cars.
I aim to retire in 2 years when I am supposed to get a nice sports car so I literally pray I will survive my current addiction.

Safe riding all.
Ah, by the way.... just thought of this. Not a plug but I have two and always wear one for track or road. It can make the difference and it is silly not to wear one.

You can still get 10% off using WHICHBIKE10 coupon at checkout.

 

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sorry for your loss @AgustaRod .
i transformed my mv last year into a "track only" bike, with the intention of buying something for the road soon after. i have to say, 2 years on, i haven't bought anything and am not missing road riding all that much (and feel so much safer on the track and high speed). am doing roughly 15 track days per season which keeps me plenty happy (enjoying the bike for it's intended design etc). hope you recover soon from this tragedy.
Yeah, I have two friends who now never ride on track but only go on Track Days and Pit Bikes. Very sensible and you still get the rush so this is perhaps the perfect solution for us all.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for your great replies and encouragement but I too am approaching retirement a couple of years off although I don't feel it and i do go out and ride fast well over three figure numbers not long ago but the odds are againstme.

Reactions are slower
The F4 is always making me feel go faster faster
I need another sports car

So the F4 will appear on here for sale in the near future I want it to go to someone who knows what it is and it's heritage.

The Brutale is the bike that my mate was owner of although he was not riding that at the time of the incident it was a Tuono V4.


481316
 

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Sorry for your losses.
Im very fortunate that I haven’t dealt with a loss like this, I see so much of it the last few years.
I was attending quite a few track days for a few years and decided to skip road riding altogether last year. I didn’t miss it once then but this year I’ve been riding every day possible.
The amount of people not paying attention while driving is maddening and played a huge part on why I didn’t ride last year.
I don’t have kids and my wife and I agree with the old adage, everyone dies but not everyone lives.
Personally the most “alive” I’ve ever felt is on two wheels.
If I die while riding I’ll be grateful because the last thing I want is to be in a hospital bed.
I agree with the previous poster that said whatever you chose will be right for you. Lastly I’ll just say taking a year or two before you sell anything isn’t to long if you’re not 100% sure.
 
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I share the same sentiment with riding in the UK. While I'm lucky in that I live in a remote part of mid Wales and we don't get the volume of traffic here (plus great roads), I reduced my road riding 15 years ago by 90 percent and now only take the bike on UK roads when I'm riding down to Dover to get the ferry or train into France - riding abroad / Europe I find is a million times better (and safer) than here in the UK. I also do the Nurburgring several times a year and teach race school at a few European tracks so get my speed out of my system that way.

I'm lucky in that I own a little sports car for the sunny days so that me and SWMBO can ad hoc it and enjoy the day somewhere (although it's only marginally safer that a bike, it's still safer).

Of all the pictures that I have of me sliding on my arse on a racetrack somewhere (and there are quite a few...), my two worse crashes have been on the road, both of which resulted in trips to ITU and various bits being taken out (I was given a 5 percent chance of living in one of the crashes). I also only go near built up areas if I have to and despair at the, quite frankly, poor standards of driving here in the UK - road rage and mobile phone use increases each year I think, despite the deterrent.
 

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Very sorry to hear of this loss and the impact it's having on his family and friends.
 

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How incredibly sad, I'm so sorry for your and the families loss.

When these things happen it really rocks you to the core, even when it's not even someone you knew, we all know it can happen to any one of us. Many times there is a lot that a rider can do to avoid these situations, sometimes there is literally nothing you can do which is so much harder to take, especially as you say, when they're a courteous and considered rider.

I have a friend who picked up a brand new V4 Tuono, he had it less than a week before it went back to the shop, a good friend of his died on a bike that same week and he just had to hand it back.

You try and steel yourself for this, all bikers know what could happen, it's hard to give it up though besides which so many things totally unrelated to biking could strike at any time. When you see youngish people taken by freak health incidents as has happened to a couple of my friends, how do you reconcile with that? Without taking any risk, they die from Cancer or something else just as indiscriminate. It's almost as though when your time is up, it's up because you could die from literally anything. A friend of mine passed from Cancer, he was a biker, he adventured everywhere, he was a fantastic writer and would blog his travels, in many ways, at least he packed in and lived a couple of lifetimes worth of experiences before his early demise (41!).

Ultimately, is it about the years of your life or the life in your years?? How many elderly people are rotting away in a care home waiting to die. It's the other end of the spectrum but a life enjoyed has to be a better than a dull life playing safe where there are still no guarantees.

For every negative thought there is about biking, there is a positive counter thought, but ultimately you have to make the decision of where the balance lies for you. At present, the biggest threat I seem to encounter as a biker is not other road users, rather the state of the local roads (South East Kent). After my recent and first 'serious' off (which by all accounts wasn't even very serious but wake up call enough that I never want to repeat it), my confidence is nowhere near where it was and I'm acutely aware of my own fragility. I went out on the F4 yesterday for not more than an hour, took it easy ish and really enjoyed it, I've barely been out on a bike for about 8 weeks. I'm not commuting to work at the moment as I used to, I don't do pack riding, perhaps I'll limit the biking to early sat/sun morning rides, I need that fix though for my own sanity and couldn't be without. If I felt like I'm about to die every time I went out I'd perhaps feel differently but somehow the mind re-calibrates and defaults back to biking.

I'd give it some time before doing anything rash and perhaps park the bike up for a bit, of course your head space is where it currently is, it's totally understandable to be questioning your own mortality vs the benefits you get from biking at a time like this while also witnessing the aftermath of what these tragedies bring for the families. Equally, all that pain and suffering can come from so many other directions, it's unfortunate that this time it's come through biking :(
 

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Sorry to hear of your loss of your biker pal. I feel your pain, having been through the same experience of losing a friend through a motorcycle accident, myself; although this did not stop me from riding, at the time (I was relatively young, in my early twenties). However I have given up on road bikes twice since. Once through a bad accident involving myself and a car and another where it was nobody else's fault, apart from mine.

As I sit here writing this (aged 52), I have been back on a road bike since March 2019, despite all that has happened before.

You have to make decisions that are right for you, at that moment in time. Life will throw many curve balls at us, which have to be dealt with, as and when. What ever decision you make ,will be the right one for you, here and now. I do not have any regrets in giving up road bikes twice before. Hopefully now; motorcycling will give me up and not the other way around.
 

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My sincere condolences, this situation is always incredibly sad and traumatic. I have been through the same thing, once fatal, another became a paraplegic, both happened when I was in my 20's. I faced the same dilema and I continued to ride, now, decades later, I have luckily become a mature rider. I have been down the road only thrice in the intervening time, twice due to indeterminate road conditions, which is the thing that spooks me the most, and once due to a moron in the classic exiting a side turning T bone scenario. Worst of that one was he actually admitted that he saw me, but thought he could make it!!! Very fortunately, I was not seriously injured in any of those.
When riding, or driving, my hazard radar is always on full power but yes, I do realise I am human and so are all the other road users, so anything can happen, and worst, the unexpected can happen, the stuff we cannot anticipate.
My riding is confined to dry, summer months only, and mostly on roads I know, so the odds of a shunt are minimised, but I'm not foolish enough to think they are eliminated.
Driving standards and conditions have deteriorated significantly over the last 20 odd years, and this is the biggest threat to bikers. The worst threat is mobile phone users, drug abusers, and the down right beligerant.
So, I have to weigh up the odds agianst me, V the utter pleasure I get from bikes and riding. I've had some challenging things in my life over recent years and I credit bikes with keeping me sane, literally. I have 21 bikes in my collection and simply cannot even contemplate losing them, they are part of me.
However, I'm not getting any younger, so is there a wise time in ones life to accept human limitation and stop riding, on the road at least?! In my youth I rode motocross, so could off road be the solution? At this time, I don't know the answer and certainly don't feel ready to stop riding, but events as experienced by the author of this thread don't make it easier.
Ride safe everyone, wishing the best to all.
 

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Sorry for your loss as well. I think people know when it is time to quit. I quit flying after eight years because of an unexplained mechanical failure. You weigh the fun verses fear component with your obligations. I have four college age kids and a wife I need to be here for. I have had three hospitalizations from motorcycle wrecks, but am not convinced in giving it up. I bought a shirt that reads,"motorcycles are dangerous," and wear it so people know I know.
 
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Last thursday another biker pal was killed by a driver pulling out by all accounts he had no chance to avoid the car according to two other bikers that were with him and witnessed it.

The rider had a lot of experience and when I rode with him he was safe and courteous .

This is the second of my biker pals to go in the past year through no fault accidents and both have left families with all the problems they now face without him I now consider it is becoming too dangerous now to ride out safely in the UK.

The constant near misses and road rage from some are getting out of hand and as for driving using a phone or following a car reaking of cannabis it's beyond a joke now

I rarely go out during normal hours I now go very early in the morning and get home before the rabble get out.

So I am considering shifting all my bikes and concentrating on staying alive.

It is a sad time for me as I love my MV .

I could sit and polish for the rest of my life though!

Oh this a tough one as it is very personal to the rider and family.

I got hurt in July 2018....I was returning home from a weekend charity ride out and I guess we covered over 500 miles on the trip...We returned home on the Sunday afternoon and after over a hundred miles across Ireland I turned into our little lane half a mile from home. Traffic on here is very light ie me and a couple of cars each day..Mainly the farmer and deliveries of Amazon to the Mrs. There's a grass strip up the middle so I was just puttering along at about 20mph.

Weather was dry and sunny and all was well, thoughts turning to putting the kettle on as the roof and gable end of our bungalow came into view....

100 yards from the house a bullock who had gotten out of his field and was quietly munching away on grass, Hidden in a field gate, decided to commit Hari Kari in front of me. Literally 5ft to go and my whole visual field was filled with the biggest brown, bovine butt you could imagine.
Its was literally, Fk, bang wallop and I was bouncing down the lane, testing the performance of my Shark Helmet.

20 mph doesn't sound much but in an instant deceleration it is. It was the first time I got hurt and I have been riding bikes since 1979. The Mrs was shook up and hasn't been back on the bike since.

I broke my collar bone which is a ridiculously painful and inconvenient way to spend a whole summer...and I thought a lot of if's and buts and what if's.

At the beginning of November that year I pulled the same bike out of the shed, serviced it and did a shakedown ride around the locale.

I then rode off to UK, met a mate, and we rode to France for the Remembrance day at the Somme memorial.
I didn't give it another thought while riding.

As soon as I sit quiet, I too think and balance it all.. It is a very personal decision.

One year before, I was driving my pickup truck across Anglesey in North Wales..Real strong vehicle, proper chassis 4 wheel rear axle and high up driving position. I was 20 minutes from the port at Holyhead and had just covered over 120 miles though the mountains.
I was in the nearside lane cruising at 60 mph nothing in front just open road, dual carriageway and I was an hour early so completely relaxed and chilled. Traffic was very, very light and road dry and good visbility.
All of a sudden I was in a terrible collision...It was like I was hit by a freight train and my truck was catapulted onto the grass verge. I hit the stone wall over which was a drop to the railway lines, blacked out and woke a second later spinning full circle across the road. The truck came to a halt facing back towards the port and probably the best parking I had done in a long time. The trucks cargo neatly dumped on the verge. The truck was wrecked beyond belief the rear axle almost ripped off.
A young man was being pursued by the Police at high speed and he slammed into me at circa 120 mph. He survived unscathed. His mate was lucky as the back of my flatbed is not a particularly nice impact zone. He was asleep on the back seat. The passenger area completely destroyed.
I was a bit peeved as my glasses flew off and I had to make a statement and had a long drawn out journey back home, getting off the Bus from Dublin at 2.30am.

So, 2 accidents within months both in a zone I would deem very safe and fluffy and all hell let loose in an instant.
The gods of fate are fickle.

We know not the day nor the hour and it is probably better that way,

I hear what you are feeling and empathise fully.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Oh this a tough one as it is very personal to the rider and family.

I got hurt in July 2018....I was returning home from a weekend charity ride out and I guess we covered over 500 miles on the trip...We returned home on the Sunday afternoon and after over a hundred miles across Ireland I turned into our little lane half a mile from home. Traffic on here is very light ie me and a couple of cars each day..Mainly the farmer and deliveries of Amazon to the Mrs. There's a grass strip up the middle so I was just puttering along at about 20mph.

Weather was dry and sunny and all was well, thoughts turning to putting the kettle on as the roof and gable end of our bungalow came into view....

100 yards from the house a bullock who had gotten out of his field and was quietly munching away on grass, Hidden in a field gate, decided to commit Hari Kari in front of me. Literally 5ft to go and my whole visual field was filled with the biggest brown, bovine butt you could imagine.
Its was literally, Fk, bang wallop and I was bouncing down the lane, testing the performance of my Shark Helmet.

20 mph doesn't sound much but in an instant deceleration it is. It was the first time I got hurt and I have been riding bikes since 1979. The Mrs was shook up and hasn't been back on the bike since.

I broke my collar bone which is a ridiculously painful and inconvenient way to spend a whole summer...and I thought a lot of if's and buts and what if's.

At the beginning of November that year I pulled the same bike out of the shed, serviced it and did a shakedown ride around the locale.

I then rode off to UK, met a mate, and we rode to France for the Remembrance day at the Somme memorial.
I didn't give it another thought while riding.

As soon as I sit quiet, I too think and balance it all.. It is a very personal decision.

One year before, I was driving my pickup truck across Anglesey in North Wales..Real strong vehicle, proper chassis 4 wheel rear axle and high up driving position. I was 20 minutes from the port at Holyhead and had just covered over 120 miles though the mountains.
I was in the nearside lane cruising at 60 mph nothing in front just open road, dual carriageway and I was an hour early so completely relaxed and chilled. Traffic was very, very light and road dry and good visbility.
All of a sudden I was in a terrible collision...It was like I was hit by a freight train and my truck was catapulted onto the grass verge. I hit the stone wall over which was a drop to the railway lines, blacked out and woke a second later spinning full circle across the road. The truck came to a halt facing back towards the port and probably the best parking I had done in a long time. The trucks cargo neatly dumped on the verge. The truck was wrecked beyond belief the rear axle almost ripped off.
A young man was being pursued by the Police at high speed and he slammed into me at circa 120 mph. He survived unscathed. His mate was lucky as the back of my flatbed is not a particularly nice impact zone. He was asleep on the back seat. The passenger area completely destroyed.
I was a bit peeved as my glasses flew off and I had to make a statement and had a long drawn out journey back home, getting off the Bus from Dublin at 2.30am.

So, 2 accidents within months both in a zone I would deem very safe and fluffy and all hell let loose in an instant.
The gods of fate are fickle.

We know not the day nor the hour and it is probably better that way,

I hear what you are feeling and empathise fully.

Joe
Thanks Joe it is true that we are totally unaware of our "time" shall we say but I have had alot of near misses recently and was thinking of hanging up my leathers this has brought it home . Problem is I ride bikes everyday all shapes and sizes due to my job and out on road test I feel unsafe. I may feel differently in a few mths/yrs then I may start again but in the past two years three mates have died and one is far from being the same as he ever was.

Its hard but it a choice to be made.
 

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It hurts real bad losing a mate. I am grieving for a truckie friend who passed last night from cancer. I've heard that motorists don't recognise motorcyclists as human beings because we wear a helmet. When I ride, I am riding with the expectation that that car is going to pull out in front of me so I am always ready for the unexpected. It has kept me alive to this point. I have had friends killed, some maimed for life and almost lost my own son to a drunk driver who pulled a u turn in front of him on his prized GSX1100r. Never the less I won't let retards take away something from me that I love to do. Sell your bikes if you must but your giving in to society imo. If you can't bring yourself to continue riding you do own motorcycle art so consider it as such. Keep polishing. God knows there's no resale value in them.
 

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I'm very sad for your loss! I have lost several biker friends over the many years I've been riding (On two wheels all my life really-- Moped from 14 - Motorbike from 19 and on .. )

When it happens, you question the sanity of moving in traffic in such an exposed way as on a two-wheeler --
I've come off my bikes many times by now -- fortunately I never suffered any serious injuries .. The worst have been this last time with a broken thumb ..
At my age (59 closing up on 60 very fast) I'm now for the first time seriously considering getting of the roads, and only riding bikes on tracks or off-road .. The problem is that I enjoy riding so much that I will probably keep on going for as long as I can..
 
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