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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! I need some advice regarding a 2006 F4-1000s that has been sitting in my cousin's garage. I ride bikes myself, but I am definitely no mechanic. I am the guy who takes his bikes to the shop for regular maintenance rather than doing it myself in order to make sure it's done by a professional, even down to lubricating the chain. Please, no flames or hate mail - I'm trying to do what's best for this beautiful bike.

So here's the deal. My cousin owns an F4-1000s. He is the original owner. The bike has very low miles, I think around 1600. I was with him during break-in period, so I know it was done correctly. All proper maintenance has been done at the dealer in accordance with the mileage. The bike was babied and it's his pride and joy. The problem is he travels for his job and is rarely home. At this point, the bike has been sitting in his garage, not on a stand, for over a year. I don't think it has even been started all this time. It breaks my heart. We got to talking about it a few weeks ago, and we both understand that letting a bike sit like this is not a good thing. I have agreed to take care of it while he's away.

The bottom line is I need to get this gorgeous thing serviced. With the amount of time this has been sitting, would it be safe to ride to the dealer? I will obviously make sure that the coolant, brake fluid, engine oil, and tire pressure are at proper levels before starting it. Things that pop into my head as concerns are the lubrication on the chain, the fact that the gas has probably evaporated in the tank, and would the tires be safe to ride on since it's been sitting so long? I'm also sure that there was no long-term-fuel-treatment-stuff added to the gas tank before it began to sit, so is there a concern with that?
I ride bikes because I love them. Same with my cousin. Again, I am no mechanic, so while I'm sure these questions are no-brainers to you guys, they are not for me. Please be gentle. Thanks in advance for any advice you may have!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
You're kidding!!! The bike is in Tampa, Florida, US. It was purchased from Eurocycles, probably 20 miles away from where it is garaged.
 

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Eurocycles have a truck that can pick up the bike for you, however, if you check your fluids and tire pressures, you should have no issues riding the bike to the dealer. If the bike has not been moved, the chain lube would not have been worn off. Just be sensible while riding.
 

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as above but if its 20 miles i'd gently ride it

only concearn is fuel syphom it out and put fresh good fuel in

fuel starts to loose degrigation after 9 days believe it or not

so go for it
 

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You're kidding!!! The bike is in Tampa, Florida, US. It was purchased from Eurocycles, probably 20 miles away from where it is garaged.
Dont take the risk!!

Just send me the plane ticket and I'll do the whole deal for you all "In-House"

Just a few beers is all I ask.

Problem Solved!!


:smoking:
 

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If it was me I'd be most concerned about 3 things:
1: Tyre pressure.
2: Fuel quality after 18 months.
3: Battery.

No easy way to remove all the fuel from the bike (including the pump / fuel lines and fuel rail). As advised above you could remove the old fuel from the tank and fill her up a little. I'd personally only put a small amount of fuel in there, slightly more than enough to get to the dealer and back. Why? Because those tanks are a bitch to remove when they are full of fuel (heavy) and your mechanic will appreciate that. I'm pretty sure that this bike will require a new battery. Check the tyre pressures before you ride the bike. They a likely to be well below the required pressure and the bike may be unsafe to ride like that.
Good luck,
Let us know how you get on.
 

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One thought on the fuel, old fuel looses octane very fast and what is left burns very poorly. After 18 months it may not even burn at all. Looses 10 octane every 6 weeks springs to mind (from where? - who knows?). Below 80 it probably won't start, below 60 you carn't even light it with a match.

Get as much out of the tank as you can and then put a couple of gallons of the highest octane you can get in. Get it running, and then get that fuel out again (put it in your car - it won't notice), and put some good gas in it. (as this fuel will be in part good gas and in part rubbish gas)

The residual fuel after you empty it the first time will be diluted twice by good fuel.

The first time you get it going - expect it to run like crap.

After chenging the fuel again, expect it to be 90%+ back to normal.

Ditto on what the others have said about tires, if they were left with lots of air in them they will be useable, if they have gone down, likely to be flat spotted and dangerous. Any doubt, change them - you only live once and bad tires kill people.
 

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I understand your concerns but i wouldn't be so paranoid. Just fill up the tank and the fuel will mix with the old and ride it to the dealer.

I think the fuel is the last thing that will harm the engine. Here in the us we all put in 93 octane (super) which by european standards is a joke and doesn't even exist anymore for e.g. in germany. Normal gas is 95 and the MV runs on 98 or 100 (if you're picky ) in most of europe.

So don't worry about a bit lower octane for 20 miles. 93 hasn't killed any mv's here in the states so a bit lower won't do anything harmful. but if your really concerned you can put in some octane booster for the ride to the dealer.
 

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I think the fuel is the last thing that will harm the engine. Here in the us we all put in 93 octane (super) which by european standards is a joke and doesn't even exist anymore for e.g. in germany. Normal gas is 95 and the MV runs on 98 or 100 (if you're picky ) in most of europe.
They use a different method of listing octane...we all have the same basic fuel. Our 89 is like their 95.

Except they probably don't have the ethanol we get that causes the gas to go bad so quickly.
 

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Information taken from wikipedia for y'all:

Research Octane Number (RON)
The most common type of octane rating worldwide is the Research Octane Number (RON).

Motor Octane Number (MON)
There is another type of octane rating, called Motor Octane Number (MON) which is a better measure of how the fuel behaves when under load. MON testing uses a similar test engine to that used in RON testing, but with a preheated fuel mixture, a higher engine speed, and variable ignition timing to further stress the fuel's knock resistance. Depending on the composition of the fuel, the MON of a modern gasoline will be about 8 to 10 points lower than the RON.

Ed's never wrong. (That wasn't from wikipedia, it's just my opinion)
 

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One thought on the fuel, old fuel looses octane very fast and what is left burns very poorly. After 18 months it may not even burn at all. Looses 10 octane every 6 weeks springs to mind (from where? - who knows?). Below 80 it probably won't start, below 60 you carn't even light it with a match.
I have a full fuel container that's been sitting for almost five years... by your statements it should be well below an octane rating of 60.

I have the video camera... you bring the matches....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Awesome information everybody, I really appreciate it. The battery has had a tender on it the whole time, so if the battery is still good, it should be charged. I'll definitely check the tire pressure as well. Thanks again for all of the tips and I'll write back with the verdict, and of course, pictures! :D
 
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