2016 Brutale 800 - New Rider, And Some Questions - MVAgusta.net
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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-10-2016, 12:02 PM Thread Starter
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2016 Brutale 800 - New Rider, And Some Questions

Hello everyone!

I just paid a downpayment on the new and updated 2016 Brutale 800! The bike is here in Dubai already, so as soon as I get my license, I plan on finishing the payment and getting it.

I was actually going for a Monster 821 but after seeing the reviews stating that the new Brutale 800 isn't as nervous as the pervious Brutales, as well as being won-over by the added features (quick shifter, auto-blipper and hydraulic clutch). This is my very first bike. I do admit that I am a little intimidated by the the thing knowing that not only is it a big-capacity bike but also one of the sharpest middle-weight naked bikes, but I was so adamant that my bike should have the fool-proof electronics package. Beginner 300CC bikes are a big let down when it comes to ABS, Traction Control as well as good tires. Having taken everything into perspective, here are my questions for you guys:

1- Is the bike too much for a beginner even in 'wet' riding mode with the 80-ish HP? Is the bike too much for a beginner to begin with from a dynamic standpoint? Despite being a rider for the first time, I'm not usually a reckless person on public roads as a driver; I tend to respect the car I'm driving as well as the lives of others even though I'm absolutely obsessed with sportscars and my previous car was a Mitsubishi Evo 9 with 550 HP. Thoughts?

2- I wanted to add a steering damper for added safety but MV hasn't launched anything yet for this very bike? Do you happen to know any company that has already made specific mounts/brackets for it? I hope I could find one that can accommodate an Ohlins damper.

3- Have you guys heard of any aftermarket exhausts for it yet? I want it for safety reasons (loudness on the road for easier detection) more so than acoustics.


Your inputs are very much appreciated

Last edited by NitrousOxide; 05-10-2016 at 12:04 PM. Reason: typo
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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-10-2016, 01:51 PM
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Welcome along

Just remember the throttle twists in BOTH directions and don't ride outside of your own comfort zone/ability. Often new riders get caught out when trying to keep up with their more experienced mates?

I'd try the bike first before worrying about a steering damper, I didn't feel the need for one on my 2013 Brutale 800 and from what I've read the new Brutale is far less nervous in its handling?

Try looking for exhausts made for the TV and Stradale, they have similar footpeg set ups as the new Brutale and if they are the same then they should fit. Contact the reseller/manufacturer directly to check?

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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 09:07 AM
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Love the 2016 Brutale...i rode one for an afternoon through the Melbourne hills.
Start of in rain mode with full traction control and gradually power up and reduce traction control as you get some miles under your belt and are used to the bike....oh and as above, be sensible with the twist of the wrist! ...cause she will bite! Steering damper is not necessary for regular riding as the rake of the forks is different from previous years.
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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by NitrousOxide View Post
Hello everyone!

I just paid a downpayment on the new and updated 2016 Brutale 800! The bike is here in Dubai already, so as soon as I get my license, I plan on finishing the payment and getting it.

I was actually going for a Monster 821 but after seeing the reviews stating that the new Brutale 800 isn't as nervous as the pervious Brutales, as well as being won-over by the added features (quick shifter, auto-blipper and hydraulic clutch). This is my very first bike. I do admit that I am a little intimidated by the the thing knowing that not only is it a big-capacity bike but also one of the sharpest middle-weight naked bikes, but I was so adamant that my bike should have the fool-proof electronics package. Beginner 300CC bikes are a big let down when it comes to ABS, Traction Control as well as good tires. Having taken everything into perspective, here are my questions for you guys:

1- Is the bike too much for a beginner even in 'wet' riding mode with the 80-ish HP? Is the bike too much for a beginner to begin with from a dynamic standpoint? Despite being a rider for the first time, I'm not usually a reckless person on public roads as a driver; I tend to respect the car I'm driving as well as the lives of others even though I'm absolutely obsessed with sportscars and my previous car was a Mitsubishi Evo 9 with 550 HP. Thoughts?

2- I wanted to add a steering damper for added safety but MV hasn't launched anything yet for this very bike? Do you happen to know any company that has already made specific mounts/brackets for it? I hope I could find one that can accommodate an Ohlins damper.

3- Have you guys heard of any aftermarket exhausts for it yet? I want it for safety reasons (loudness on the road for easier detection) more so than acoustics.


Your inputs are very much appreciated
Since you already made your decisions it is kind of a moot point whether or not the bike is too much. Having said that, let me provide a couple of thoughts.

Yes, I do think it is too much of a bike for a new rider. The old argument that is always brought up like "Throttle only goes as far as you twist it" and anything along the lines isn't really more than a self-made point to justify a bike beyond your skill set. The issue is not twisting the throttle under control, the issue most new riders have is throttle movement under panic. And yes, you will usually have some of these. Twisting the throttle 10 degrees yields way different results on a 100hp bike vs. a 40hp bike.

As to the safety features...most of the 300cc bikes these days have at least ABS standard (or as an option), any OEM tire is more than capable unless you are using the street for a race track (and even if not, tires can be easily swapped), and traction control really only makes sense on higher hp/torque motorcycles. A typical 300cc motorcycle certainly doesn't need it.

Unfortunately, the safety features do have somewhat of a negative aspect as well in my books...you start to rely on them. Watching videos of people on bikes with traction control...I am always amazed how often you see the traction control light flickering...sometimes in nearly every corner. If the electronic aid ever fails, a lot of these riders probably will be in for an interesting surprise. Don't get me wrong, these safety features certainly provides tons of benefits for street riding...I just make it a focus of mine not to rely on them.

A "beginners" bike lets you focus on the fundamentals of the riding without having constantly thinking about your throttle application. Fundamentals make the difference between becoming a rider or a statistical value. Fundamentals make the difference between you controlling the bike versus the bike controlling you.

At the end of the day, it boils down to one simple point for me: Do yo want to learn how to ride a motorcycle correctly, or do you want to look good sitting on it?

Disclaimer: Yes, I know people have started on 600cc/1000cc bikes and survived/learned fundamentals and are able to control a motorcycle efficiently - but they are in the minority (of course nobody usually will admit that they can't control it). I have started on a 600cc sport bikes...and it took - and still is taking - me a while to unlearn some of the habits accumulated from it...and guess on what motorcycle I am unlearning them...a 373cc bike (KTM RC390). This bike has taught me more about fundamentals than my first three 600cc bikes combined. And this bike is exclusively ridden on a track where fundamentals are even more important.

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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 11:07 AM
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The only real way to learn riding is by crashing. Living in Dubai i would get a dirt bike and crash in a 'controlled' environment. What i'm actually saying is buy the bike and be like the 95 of us. If you want to be a serious fast and safe rider and from what i've been reading is not your goal track it or try dirt biking.

I've had a serious crash a few years ago and consider myself on the high side of the 95. Crash had nothing to do with my skills as a rider but happy to still be a live. So now i'm riding sissy style and picked up mountainbiking where i'm really pushing my skills.

Last edited by Lacsap; 05-11-2016 at 12:04 PM.
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 02:45 PM Thread Starter
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Welcome along

Just remember the throttle twists in BOTH directions and don't ride outside of your own comfort zone/ability. Often new riders get caught out when trying to keep up with their more experienced mates?

I'd try the bike first before worrying about a steering damper, I didn't feel the need for one on my 2013 Brutale 800 and from what I've read the new Brutale is far less nervous in its handling?

Try looking for exhausts made for the TV and Stradale, they have similar footpeg set ups as the new Brutale and if they are the same then they should fit. Contact the reseller/manufacturer directly to check?
That you very much for you reply!

I love your "throttle twists in BOTH directions" point hahaha! Hopefully I remember this for as long as I live!

I was told the same about the steering damper. I'm just being extra cautious given the power of the thing!

As for the exhausts, I did ask my MV manager today and he told me he'll confirm whether they will fit without any problem soon!

Thanks dear
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
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Love the 2016 Brutale...i rode one for an afternoon through the Melbourne hills.
Start of in rain mode with full traction control and gradually power up and reduce traction control as you get some miles under your belt and are used to the bike....oh and as above, be sensible with the twist of the wrist! ...cause she will bite! Steering damper is not necessary for regular riding as the rake of the forks is different from previous years.
Thank you very much for your input! I plan on doing exactly that!

Thanks again
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
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Since you already made your decisions it is kind of a moot point whether or not the bike is too much. Having said that, let me provide a couple of thoughts.

Yes, I do think it is too much of a bike for a new rider. The old argument that is always brought up like "Throttle only goes as far as you twist it" and anything along the lines isn't really more than a self-made point to justify a bike beyond your skill set. The issue is not twisting the throttle under control, the issue most new riders have is throttle movement under panic. And yes, you will usually have some of these. Twisting the throttle 10 degrees yields way different results on a 100hp bike vs. a 40hp bike.

As to the safety features...most of the 300cc bikes these days have at least ABS standard (or as an option), any OEM tire is more than capable unless you are using the street for a race track (and even if not, tires can be easily swapped), and traction control really only makes sense on higher hp/torque motorcycles. A typical 300cc motorcycle certainly doesn't need it.

Unfortunately, the safety features do have somewhat of a negative aspect as well in my books...you start to rely on them. Watching videos of people on bikes with traction control...I am always amazed how often you see the traction control light flickering...sometimes in nearly every corner. If the electronic aid ever fails, a lot of these riders probably will be in for an interesting surprise. Don't get me wrong, these safety features certainly provides tons of benefits for street riding...I just make it a focus of mine not to rely on them.

A "beginners" bike lets you focus on the fundamentals of the riding without having constantly thinking about your throttle application. Fundamentals make the difference between becoming a rider or a statistical value. Fundamentals make the difference between you controlling the bike versus the bike controlling you.

At the end of the day, it boils down to one simple point for me: Do yo want to learn how to ride a motorcycle correctly, or do you want to look good sitting on it?

Disclaimer: Yes, I know people have started on 600cc/1000cc bikes and survived/learned fundamentals and are able to control a motorcycle efficiently - but they are in the minority (of course nobody usually will admit that they can't control it). I have started on a 600cc sport bikes...and it took - and still is taking - me a while to unlearn some of the habits accumulated from it...and guess on what motorcycle I am unlearning them...a 373cc bike (KTM RC390). This bike has taught me more about fundamentals than my first three 600cc bikes combined. And this bike is exclusively ridden on a track where fundamentals are even more important.
Thank you so very much for your thorough reply! You have very valid point across the entire post!

I did buy the bike already, indeed, but its not an issue for me to start on a smaller bike till I get my skills in shape especially, as you said, till I have better control in 'panic' situations. I did look already at the 300CC bike category; the R3 is not available in Dubai at all because it failed to sell when it was launched, so they stopped stocking them completely; the kawasaki ninja did feel good but it had rubbish tires and the riding position was very aggressive knowing that this bike isn't a permanent one but a transitional one; I didn't feel comfortable having the idea that my riding style will change dramatically between the aggressive race style and the more upright naked style.

I do admit that the best option was the KTM Duke 390 (not the aggressive-riding RC), but I didn't want to buy a new one because its just too expensive at $7000 for a bike that won't be ridden for long; if I find a used one on the market, I'll grab it instantly and put the Brutale on hold for a while. I really am not in a hurry -- I just want to balance the whole equation for myself.

I was looking yesterday at the used market hoping to find some cheap naked-style options to start with. Kindly do let me know if the bikes below would be a good starting point even though they're weaker than the one I'm training on (125cc vs 150cc)

the two bike below are for sale for about $1500!

https://sharjah.dubizzle.com/motors/...X19sdGU9&pos=1

https://sharjah.dubizzle.com/motors/...Vscz0%3D&pos=0

Also, here's a not-so-cheap Yamaha SR400 for about $3800:

https://sharjah.dubizzle.com/motors/...X19sdGU9&pos=3

Do you advice me to start with any of these bikes?


Thank you again for the very thoughtful reply of yours!

Last edited by NitrousOxide; 05-11-2016 at 04:57 PM.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 03:08 PM Thread Starter
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The only real way to learn riding is by crashing. Living in Dubai i would get a dirt bike and crash in a 'controlled' environment. What i'm actually saying is buy the bike and be like the 95 of us. If you want to be a serious fast and safe rider and from what i've been reading is not your goal track it or try dirt biking.

I've had a serious crash a few years ago and consider myself on the high side of the 95. Crash had nothing to do with my skills as a rider but happy to still be a live. So now i'm riding sissy style and picked up mountainbiking where i'm really pushing my skills.
owww man! This is one scary reply haha! First of all I'm happy to know you're now in healthy state, and second, thank you for your reply!

I hope I never crash! I really mean it especially on public roads! As much as I want to avoid crashing, I might be slightly better off crashing on a race-circuit knowing that I have a bigger safety margin and more protective gear! But then I hope again I become a brilliant rider without ever crashing lol! God is there to answer my wish

Thank you dear

Last edited by NitrousOxide; 05-11-2016 at 04:54 PM.
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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 03:49 PM
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Hhhhmmmm. Its not necessary to crash in order to learn how to ride. That just teaches you how to crash. The problem you'll find is that the bike is in front of your head. Unless you are very lucky/gifted your first bike whatever it is will exceed the ability of your mind to keep up with what's happening. The faster the bike the longer it will take to come to terms.

My first bike was a 1200 and I survived although a modern performance bike like yours is way faster and more responsive to your inputs which is good and bad. If you do something wrong you'll get in trouble far more quickly. OK ABS and TC are wonderful but they're no guarantee. Unless you have balls of titanium or are completely mechanically insensitive it will be a very long time before you activate the traction control in a bend. Most bike crashes are caused by riders being unable to accurately position the bike usually in bends. No technology can do that for you.

Oh and watch out idiot car drivers.
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