Larger engine capacity: Pros and cons - MVAgusta.net
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2008, 07:02 PM Thread Starter
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Larger engine capacity: Pros and cons

I think this could be a useful thread for those considering upgrading to larger engine size (1000cc, or 1078) F4s and Bruties.
What would you list as the top, say, 5 pros and cons?

As the owner of an older model F4 750 who tragically keeps looking at (and being tempted by) the latest and greatest F4s out there, I keep thinking I must be missing something.

750cc is all I'm probably competent to ride, no heating or overheating problems, heaps of performance with only a couple of mods, and lots of fun; The latest and greatest keeps calling my name though....

Your views?
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2008, 07:16 PM
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Jose, the nice thing about the bigger bikes is not only more power, but more torque. You can be a little lazy when riding and use the torque to pull you out of corners etc. very nice if you ever do any two up riding.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-02-2008, 10:54 PM
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Lots of power is good but only if you can utilize it , otherwise it can get you in lots of trouble, small bike is good enjoy it !!! and I m with You on that one (no overheating problems or in fact no major issues with small bikes ) Forget it save your money for a new F4 !!! N.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-03-2008, 12:31 AM
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As a previous owner of a 750cc, I enjoyed the 750cc more on the twisties than the 1000cc. On the straights and freeways yeah no doubts the 1000cc is better due to the increase in torque.

I enjoy making the 750 sing and frantically changing gears to keep her in the upper power band was lots of fun. I use to be constantly bouncing off the rev limiter on the 750 out of corners but the 1000 you be luckly to hit 10,000rpm in any gear.

The 750 was easer on the rear tyre compared to the 1000. The 1000 tends to want to wheelie out of every corner or high side you if you are too liberal with the throttle on a corner. If you can keep the 750 singing and have a nice smooth flow/rhythm, it is very hard to fault the 750 even the EVO1 engine.

Yeah 1000 gets very warm.

I had a great trade-in change over price from a 750 to the 1000, so it was worth the upgrade else I would keep the 750 no question ask.

Slow is smooth and smooth is fast!!
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-03-2008, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by RobP View Post
Jose, the nice thing about the bigger bikes is not only more power, but more torque. You can be a little lazy when riding and use the torque to pull you out of corners etc. very nice if you ever do any two up riding.
Rob-b-rite! It's all about the torque on the street. I owned a 750 Brutie before two 910 Bruties. I loved the 750, but it's a little like a show horse. Gotta work it hard to enjoy it.

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-03-2008, 02:15 PM
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The 750 in-line 4 demands the rider get involved in every corner--precise gear selection to keep things smooth so you can learn a lot about riding a bike properly. And you can take it up to redline much more often on a 750, which is spine-tingling. With the big engines, you get big torque which is good fun too, and you can get away with lazy gear selection, which could mean you actually learn less about how the pros ride. But long distance cruising is better on a big torque machine.
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-03-2008, 04:39 PM
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I had 2 MV 750s and have a F41000S and the power delivery is very different. I thought the F41000S would feel like an R1 (which felt like a 1000cc version of the MV 750) but it's not. I'd highly recommend a F41000S or R over a 750.
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-03-2008, 08:40 PM Thread Starter
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So, am I to understand that the extra torque and power delivery experience more than make up for the niggling issues with the 1000cc? Also, is the F41000S less prone to the issues? There are a few of them in Sydney going at a very reasonable price
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-03-2008, 09:23 PM
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So, am I to understand that the extra torque and power delivery experience more than make up for the niggling issues with the 1000cc? Also, is the F41000S less prone to the issues? There are a few of them in Sydney going at a very reasonable price
Jose, when I was looking at my bike my choices were the s or the new at the time R. Power-wise, I didn't need any more than the s, but the R offered a few things that really where worth the price, namely the wheels and radial brakes, but the extra power and the forks where also a plus.

I know the overheating thing here has been beaten to death so I won't get into it again. I think you should consider how you are using the bike. Are you dooing a lot of commuting where you will be stuck in traffic or are you going to be using it mostly for recreational purposes? I live in an area where the temperatures reach 100-110 degrees farenheit in the summer. It isn't pleasant to ride anything in that temperature, Other than that the bike rides a bit warm, the seat gets warm but nothing that I can't live with and I don't notice it at all when the road gets twisty.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 07-03-2008, 09:41 PM
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Here are my two cents- I love the little bike (enjoy to ride the sh.....t out of it ) I enjoy high RPM output engine makes you feel like you acctually ride the bike , put some sillmotor carbon pipes on it with a BMC air filter " sweeeeet " You ll have much more confidence with a little bike. On the other hand I love the big bike also, Lots of power ( Ok it s not a ZX10 but still plenty enough (F41000 S) with RG3,Pc and BMC air filter "sweeet" : Power is only good if you can utilize it : Otherwise it can get you in trouble or worst !!! So it depends on your style of riding , street or track days ??? also there are tracks that suit much better the small bike. As for the big bike stay away from early production bikes. Regardless of the engine size , new bikes need to be de bugged. Remember 916 ??? same goes for F4 , as for me I stay away from the latest simply because I think late production has problems due to manufacturers cutting costs , parts are being replaced with alternatives not necessarilly better , also cheaper electronics , magnesium parts replaced with alluminum etc etc . Sorry guys that is just my oppinion !!! Im not saying that late production bikes are bad , In fact Im sure there are also a lots of improvements in some areas ,so the best way is somewhere in the middle . Anyway good luck !!!
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