F3 warm up. Manual sais No ? - MVAgusta.net
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-29-2016, 01:33 PM Thread Starter
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F3 warm up. Manual sais No ?

I couldnt believe the manual sais dont warm the bike up. I bet this is controversial but would like to hear experienced mechanics opinions.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-29-2016, 01:53 PM
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No need to "warm up" engines these days. With current manufatcuring and oils, the days of sitting there and letting your engine come up to temp are gone. Non-aggressive riding unti lyou reach normal temperature is the norm.

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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-29-2016, 02:02 PM
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What he said .....

I still wait a few moments until the temp light reads a flashing number instead of a line....just to give everything a chance to settle down (ECM gets stable readings from sensors).

Now if you are running a straight 50 weight oil....yeah, better let the oil get warm. But that's real old school.

Modern car owner manuals tell you it is harmful to the engine to sit there "warming it up".

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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-30-2016, 12:13 AM Thread Starter
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Ok cool, thanks.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-30-2016, 10:20 AM
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Modern engines, old engines, any engines in fact work on the same principles. These principles rely on clearances and fit between components. An engine is designed to be most efficient when running at normal temperature. Until normal temperature is reached, some components will wear faster as clearances are different. The laws of physics havn't changed. Lubricants have by design improved tremendously and reduce wear with greater efficiency than the days of old. Some industries have designed systems to greatly increase efficiency. For example the airline industry uses a system that cools the engine casing as the engine warms up thus shrinking it to minimise blade clearance on the rotor thus increasing efficiency and minimising wear by keeping blade clearance pretty much the same throughout the temp range of the engine. Formula 1 cars have such close tolerances on clearance that when the engine is cold the engine is effectively seized due to clearances dissapearing as the metal contracts due to lack of temp. They have to circulate hot water through the cooling system before being able to turn the engine over to start it.
most car and motorcycle manufacturers have not adopted these systems as they would not be cost effective and take time to implement. Car and bike users need to be able to start and go quickly.

Modern day mechanics have progressed in leaps and bounds and todays engines are much better than the engines of old. They last longer and work better. Therefor the manufacturers are not getting the resales they used to when older engines were wearing out and needed replacing. Manufacturers need custom to stay in business. If you needed custom to stay in business you would not tell your customers how to preserve your engine for longevity as it would seriously reduce future sales.
This is my take on the subject and only my opinion. I have been riding bikes and driving cars for 40 years and try whenever possible to treat my engines well and not labour them till they have reached normal running temp. I believe this has probably saved a lot of engine wear in the past. Everyone is entitled to their own beliefs so the way you treat your engines is your business but I will always whenever possible let mine warm up properly before stressing them.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-02-2016, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squidger View Post
t Formula 1 cars have such close tolerances on clearance that when the engine is cold the engine is effectively seized due to clearances dissapearing as the metal contracts due to lack of temp.
To the best of my knowledge metal expands when heated, if the engine is seized when cold it would most certainly be locked solid when hot

personally I am a warm up person

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-02-2016, 11:20 PM
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This whole thread is a load of crap anyway. The manual does not say don't warm up the engine. It says to warm it up by riding gently, not by leaving it idling on the sidestand.

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-03-2016, 04:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tasty F3 View Post
To the best of my knowledge metal expands when heated, if the engine is seized when cold it would most certainly be locked solid when hot

personally I am a warm up person
Don't just think about, say the piston expanding inside the cylinder, think of the cylinder expanding also. Also some parts will heat up faster/more than other components.

Kag

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-03-2016, 06:11 AM
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Do you sit and wait for your car to warm up before you drive it, no you don't unless you're in snowed in area.

The only time we still pre warm motors is for racing, it's called heat soak. About 20min before going out we start the bike and get the water and oil up to proper operating temp. Then turn it off and wait for go race siren, by then the heat has soaked all other parts in the warmth, drive out and straight into the redline without a worry.

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Last edited by Donsy; 03-03-2016 at 06:16 AM.
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