Carbon wheels and suspension set up - MVAgusta.net
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 06:11 AM Thread Starter
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Carbon wheels and suspension set up

I have installed BST carbon wheels on my 1078RR. The suspension was pretty much ideal for me with the stock wheels using the factory comfort settings. With the carbon wheels it feel like it needs to be softened further. Anyone got any experience with adjusting suspension specifically for carbon wheels? I mean is it expected that you need to go much softer On both comp and rebound as a general rule?

The bike feels more agile, turns quicker and the most surprising thing is the acceleration feels more fierce, was aggressive before but it's completely rampant now.

Last edited by davman; 09-15-2010 at 08:06 PM.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 07:24 AM
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Hi.
The rotating mass and unsprung weight are now much less than before. Some softening of the settings will compensate for the change and return your bike to the way you want it. Just experiment a bit at a time.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 11:27 AM
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Davman, sorry I can't really help with settings other than reiterate oldnfast's statement as this is purely personal and all to do with what you like in feedback from the bike, but will keep an eye on this thread as considering this conversion myself.

I have seen the 5 spoke design on a 1078 but if yours are the 7 spoke design would it be ok with you if you could post / or PM me some pictures of them on the bike.

Thanks

Dave

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyBrut View Post
I have seen the 5 spoke design on a 1078 but if yours are the 7 spoke design would it be ok with you if you could post / or PM me some pictures of them on the bike.
+1

I'd love to see some pics, too!


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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 12:39 PM
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Motowheels said to add some rebound dampening, maybe 2 clicks to compensate for the bike being faster at everything so slow it down with some rebound.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 01:01 PM
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I know that Motowheels are a very reputable company with a wealth of experience. However I do question the advice to increase rebound damping, even a couple of clicks. The reason I say that is because when the bikes front and rear suspension rebounds after compression it's lifting sprung (as opposed to unsprung) mass. That includes the rider, engine, frame, fuel, wiring loom.....but not the wheels. They are unsprung mass. When it comes to rebound damping, less is almost always more (benefit).
My suspicion here is that you're going a bit faster than before (quote: completely rampant). You're arriving at corners faster than before. As a result you're most likely braking harder. Compressing the forks further and faster. On the exit of the corner you're wanting to experience the new improved acceleration so you're back on the gas faster. This will give you different feedback than you're used to.

My advice would be if you're compressing a pair of forks and your shock further (due to riding faster) don't delay the time that they can react (extend after compression) by adding rebound damping.
Dave.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_castle View Post
I know that Motowheels are a very reputable company with a wealth of experience. However I do question the advice to increase rebound damping, even a couple of clicks. The reason I say that is because when the bikes front and rear suspension rebounds after compression it's lifting sprung (as opposed to unsprung) mass. That includes the rider, engine, frame, fuel, wiring loom.....but not the wheels. They are unsprung mass. When it comes to rebound damping, less is almost always more (benefit).
My suspicion here is that you're going a bit faster than before (quote: completely rampant). You're arriving at corners faster than before. As a result you're most likely braking harder. Compressing the forks further and faster. On the exit of the corner you're wanting to experience the new improved acceleration so you're back on the gas faster. This will give you different feedback than you're used to.

My advice would be if you're compressing a pair of forks and your shock further (due to riding faster) don't delay the time that they can react (extend after compression) by adding rebound damping.
Dave.
Agreed.
With the lighter set up you now have, the springs in the forks have less weight to control so my first idea would be to have a bit less rebound, until and if, you start to run at a faster pace, then adjust.
Then maybe the rear will need attention because of the changed front action/reaction. Lucky bastard though with carbon wheels!

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 03:58 PM
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all things being equal, a lower mass wheel means you need less damping to achieve the same feel as a heavier wheel. in fact, if the unsprung weight could somehow be made zero, you would not need any suspension damping at all (i.e. you would only need a spring).

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-15-2010, 11:18 PM
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davman, looks awesome mate.

If you have the time, get in touch with 'marty moose' on PSB. Marty's assistance will be well and truly worth the effort. He has helped many of my friends for road and/or track setups and will explain to you the logic behind the changes he makes.

I've been intending to do the same since changing my wheels...haven't yet found the time.

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